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  1. added 2018-09-06
    Rerum Cognoscere Causas.Frank Hahn - 1996 - Economics and Philosophy 12 (2):183.
    Professor Hausman has written an interesting and instructive book. Though I am by no means favourably disposed to methodology for economists,, I found reading Hausman enjoyable and I came away having learned things worth learning. But not all is well, largely because Hausman is a philosopher first and an economist a poor second. There are also important questions where one would have expected philosophic help which are not asked at all.
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  2. added 2017-10-30
    The Philosophy of Austrian Economics. [REVIEW]Barry Smith - 1994 - The Review of Austrian Economics 7 (2):127-132.
    Review of The Philosophical Origins of Austrian Economics, by David Gordon. Auburn, Alabama: Ludwig von Mises Institute, 1993.
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  3. added 2017-10-30
    Aristotelianism, Apriorism, Essentialism.Barry Smith - 1994 - In Peter Boettke (ed.), The Elgar Companion to Austrian Economics. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgard. pp. 33-37.
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  4. added 2017-10-06
    Normes et jugements de valeur en économie normative.Philippe Mongin - 1999 - Social Science Information 38 (4):521-553.
    This paper discusses the nature of normative economics by distinguishing the alternative conceptions that economists have entertained in this respect. It attempts at connecting these conceptions with their philosophical sources, which essentially consist in variants of positivism and Weber's philosophy of values. The paper defends the claim that positive and normative economics differ from each other to the extent that the former does not, while the latter does, involve value judgments made by the theorist himself. This claim runs counter to (...)
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  5. added 2016-12-12
    Reflection Without Rules: Economic Methodology and Contemporary Science Theory.D. Wade Hands - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Reflection without Rules offers a comprehensive, pointed exploration of the methodological tradition in economics and the breakdown of the received view within the philosophy of science. Professor Hands investigates economists' use of naturalistic and sociological paradigms to model economic phenomena and assesses the roles of pragmatism, discourse, and situatedness in discussions of economic practice before turning to a systematic exploration of more recent developments in economic methodology. The treatment emphasizes the changes taking place in science theory and its relationship to (...)
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  6. added 2015-09-22
    Preferences and Positivist Methodology in Economics.Christopher Clarke - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (2):192-212.
    I distinguish several doctrines that economic methodologists have found attractive, all of which have a positivist flavour. One of these is the doctrine that preference assignments in economics are just shorthand descriptions of agents' choice behaviour. Although most of these doctrines are problematic, the latter doctrine about preference assignments is a respectable one, I argue. It doesn't entail any of the problematic doctrines, and indeed it is warranted independently of them.
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  7. added 2015-09-10
    Testing, Rationality and Progress: Essays on the Popperian Tradition in Economic Methodology.D. Wade Hands - 1993 - Roman & Littlefield.
    This book brings together ten previously published essays on the philosophy of economics and economic methodology. The general theme is the application of Karl Popper's philosophy of science to economics -- not only by Popper himself but also by other members of the "Popperian school." There are three major issues that surface repeatedly: the applicability of Popper's falsificationist philosophy of science; the applicability of I. Lakatos's "methodology of scientific research programs" to economics; and the question of Popper's "situational analysis" approach (...)
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  8. added 2015-09-10
    Popper, the Rationality Principle and Economic Explanation.D. Wade Hands - 1991 - In G. K. Shaw (ed.), Economics, Culture, and Education: Essays in Honor of Mark Blaug. Edward Elgar. pp. 108-119.
  9. added 2015-09-10
    Thirteen Theses on Progress in Economic Methodology.D. Wade Hands - 1990 - Finnish Economic Papers 3:72-76.
  10. added 2015-09-10
    The Methodology of Economic Research Programmes.Douglas W. Hands - 1979 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 9 (3):293.
  11. added 2014-10-10
    Why Economic Modelers Can't Exclude Psychological Processing Variables.Don Ross - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (1):87-92.
  12. added 2014-09-30
    Lakatosian Consolations for Economics.Alexander Rosenberg - 1986 - Economics and Philosophy 2 (1):127.
    The F-twist is giving way to the methodology of scientific research programs. Milton Friedman's “Methodology for Economics” is being supplanted as the orthodox rationale for neoclassical economics by Imre Lakatos' account of scientific respectability. Friedman's instrumentalist thesis that theories are to be judged by the confirmation of their consequences and not the realism of their assumptions has long been widely endorsed by economists, under Paul Samuelson's catchy rubric “the F-twist.” It retains its popularity among economists who want no truck with (...)
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  13. added 2014-09-25
    Making Sense of Friedman's Methodology in Theory and Action.Roberta Muramatsu - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (3):333-338.
    (2010). Making sense of Friedman's methodology in theory and action. Journal of Economic Methodology: Vol. 17, No. 3, pp. 333-338. doi: 10.1080/1350178X.2010.513762.
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  14. added 2014-09-25
    Popper and Tarski.David Miller - 1999 - In I. C. Jarvie & Sandra Pralong (eds.), Popper's Open Society After Fifty Years: The Continuing Relevance of Karl Popper. Routledge.
  15. added 2014-09-25
    Plausibility in Economics.Bart Nooteboom - 1986 - Economics and Philosophy 2 (2):197.
    According to the instrumentalism of Friedman and Machlup it is irrelevant whether the explanatory principles or “assumptions” of a theory satisfy any criterion of “plausibility,” “realism,” “credibility,” or “soundness.” In this view the main or only criterion for selecting theories is whether a theory yields empirically testable implications that turn out to be consistent with observations. All we should require or expect from a theory is that it is a useful instrument for the purpose of prediction. Considerations of the “efficiency” (...)
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  16. added 2014-09-19
    Reading the Methodological Essay in Twentieth Century Economics: Map of Multiple Perspectives.Uskali Mäki - 2009 - In The methodology of positive economics : Reflections on the Milton Friedman legacy. Cambridge University Press.
    Even outrageously unrealistic assumptions are just fine insofar as the theory or model involving them performs well in predicting phenomena of interest. Most economists and many non-economists will attribute this principle to Milton Friedman. Many will consider the principle itself outrageous, while others praise Friedman for having formulated it so persuasively.
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  17. added 2014-09-19
    The Methodology of Positive Economics : Reflections on the Milton Friedman Legacy.Uskali Mäki (ed.) - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Milton Friedman's 1953 essay 'The methodology of positive economics' remains the most cited, influential, and controversial piece of methodological writing in twentieth-century economics. Since its appearance, the essay has shaped the image of economics as a scientific discipline, both within and outside of the academy. At the same time, there has been an ongoing controversy over the proper interpretation and normative evaluation of the essay. Perceptions have been sharply divided, with some viewing economics as a scientific success thanks to its (...)
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  18. added 2014-09-19
    Filosofia y metodologia an la economia.Uskali Mäki - 2008 - In Juan José Jardón Urrieta (ed.), Temas de Teoria Economica y so Metodo. Universidade de Santiago de Compostela.
    Este documento analiza las siguientes cuestiones: 1) La metodología de la economía y su actual institucionalización. 2) La definición de Economía. 3) Las perspectivas de los economistas acerca de la Economía, sus métodos y justificación. 4) Comprobación y progreso: Popper y Lakatos.5) Los modelos y sus supuestos. 6) Persuasión retórica y verdad. 7) La Economía como un recurso para la Filosofía de la Ciencia. 8) Expansionismo explicativo y relaciones interdisciplinares.
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  19. added 2014-09-18
    Verification in Economics and History: A Sequel to Scientifization, O. F. Hamouda and B. B. Price. London: Routledge, 1991, X + 182 Pages. [REVIEW]Harold Kincaid - 1993 - Economics and Philosophy 9 (2):322.
  20. added 2014-09-17
    Truth and Progress in Economic Knowledge (Edward Elgar, 1997, X + 232 Pages) Explorations in Economic Methodology: From Lakatos to Empirical Philosophy of Science (Routledge, 1998; VII + 246 Pages) Roger E. Backhouse. [REVIEW]Kevin D. Hoover - 2000 - Economics and Philosophy 16 (2):333-378.
  21. added 2014-09-17
    The Emperor's Newest Clothes.Martin Hollis - 1985 - Economics and Philosophy 1 (1):128-133.
    There is a simple joy in finding that the emperor has positively no clothes and especially when the finger is pointed in ribald good English. Donald McCloskey does this service in “The Rhetoric of Economics”, where he argues with force and wit that “modernism” (meaning, roughly, positivism, as in “Positive Economics”) will do as an account neither of what economists do nor of what it makes philosophical sense for them to attempt. Instead they should recognize that models are always metaphors (...)
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  22. added 2014-09-16
    Social Science, Ethics and Utilitarianism A Review of Leland B. Yeager's Ethics as Social Science: The Moral Philosophy of Social Cooperation.A. Hamlin - 2002 - Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (2):245-250.
  23. added 2014-09-15
    Beyond the Positive–Normative Dichotomy: Some Remarks on Colander's Lost Art of Economics.Huei-Chun Su - 2012 - Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (4):375-390.
    In a series of articles later collected in his book The Lost Art of Economics, David Colander argues that the dichotomous distinction of positive and normative economics has misled economists into treating applied policy economics as part of positive economics and hence adopting the methodology of positive economics for applied policy analysis. Colander therefore urges a reintroduction of the art of economics and calls for a serious discussion on the appropriate methodology for applied policy work. This paper first explores some (...)
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  24. added 2014-09-15
    A Positivist Tradition in Early Demand Theory.David Teira Serrano - 2006 - Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (1):25-47.
    In this paper I explore a positivist methodological tradition in early demand theory, as exemplified by several common traits that I draw from the works of V. Pareto, H. L. Moore and H. Schultz. Assuming a current approach to explanation in the social sciences, I will discuss the building of their various explanans, showing that the three authors agreed on two distinctive methodological features: the exclusion of any causal commitment to psychology when explaining individual choice and the mandate to test (...)
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  25. added 2014-09-15
    Model Selection and Multiple Research Goals: The Case of Rational Addiction.Andrew M. Yuengert - 2006 - Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (1):77-96.
    A comparison of rational addiction and time inconsistency models of addiction highlights the complexities of model selection when researchers have goals in addition to empirical fit. Although currently the two models of addiction are underdetermined by data, each offers a different understanding of addiction; moreover, the two models offer starkly different policy implications. When the goals of understanding and policy usefulness are added to the goal of empirical fit, a more complex account of model selection is needed. First, the principle (...)
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  26. added 2014-09-12
    A Revision of the Neoclassical Economics Methodology.Geert Reuten - 1996 - Journal of Economic Methodology 3 (1):39-68.
    The practice of neoclassical economics is characterized as an ?axiomatic positivism?, which is far removed from the official (Popper-Lakatos) methodology of neoclassicism. Hausman (1992) attempts to provide a full revision of that official methodology, for which he takes recourse to the methodological work of J.S. Mill. Hausman's methodology is problematical because of: (1) an inadequate distinction between a normative and a descriptive methodology; (2) an insufficient consideration of the empirical stages of theory appraisal; (3) a misleading account of the tendential (...)
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  27. added 2014-09-12
    Economics: Mathematical Politics or Science of Diminishing Returns?Alexander Rosenberg - 1992 - University of Chicago Press.
    Economics today cannot predict the likely outcome of specific events any better than it could in the time of Adam Smith. This is Alexander Rosenberg's controversial challenge to the scientific status of economics. Rosenberg explains that the defining characteristic of any science is predictive improvability--the capacity to create more precise forecasts by evaluating the success of earlier predictions--and he forcefully argues that because economics has not been able to increase its predictive power for over two centuries, it is not a (...)
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  28. added 2014-09-11
    Remarks on 'The Methodology of Positive Economics'.Melvin W. Reder - 2003 - Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (4):527-530.
    Friedman's essay argued that the primary criterion of validity for economic models was not descriptive fidelity, but the accuracy and importance of the predictions generated by its implications. His argument was directed against a major current of mid?twentieth?century economics that sought to alter neoclassical theory by displacing the competitive firm as a centerpiece of price theory. The success of Friedman's counter argument was due not only to its cogency but also to major improvements in econometric techniques, data sources and computational (...)
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  29. added 2014-09-09
    Signifying Nothing: Reply to Hoover and Siegler.Deirdre N. McCloskey & Stephen T. Ziliak - 2008 - Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (1):39-55.
    After William Gosset (1876?1937), the ?Student? of Student's t, the best statisticians have distinguished economic (or agronomic or psychological or medical) significance from merely statistical ?significance? at conventional levels. A singular exception among the best was Ronald A. Fisher, who argued in the 1920s that statistical significance at the 0.05 level is a necessary and sufficient condition for establishing a scientific result. After Fisher many economists and some others ? but rarely physicists, chemists, and geologists, who seldom use Fisher?significance ? (...)
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  30. added 2014-09-09
    Knowledge, Planning, and Markets: A Missing Chapter in the Socialist Calculation Debates.John O'neill - 2006 - Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):55-78.
    This paper examines the epistemological arguments about markets and planning that emerged in a series of unpublished exchanges between Hayek and Neurath. The exchanges reveal problems for standard accounts of both the socialist calculation debates and logical empiricism. They also raise questions concerning the sources of ignorance and uncertainty in modern economies, and the role of market and non-market organisations in the distribution and coordination of limited knowledge, which remain relevant to contemporary debates in economics. Hayek had argued that Neurath's (...)
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  31. added 2014-09-09
    Alfred Schutz and Economics as a Social Science.Allen Oakley - 2000 - Human Studies 23 (3):243-260.
    Over the years, a number of interpreters with an interest in economics have given some attention the work of Alfred Schutz. As intimated in this literature, the orientation of his delimited thought on economics stemmed from contacts with the Austrian school during his Vienna years. Probably because of this connection, there exists among these interpreters an inclination uncritically to align Schutz with the Austrians' thought. What will be argued in this paper is that in adopting such an uncritical position, each (...)
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  32. added 2014-09-09
    Economics and Reality.Tony Lawson - 1997 - Routledge.
    There is an increasingly widespread belief, both within and outside the discipline, that modern economics is irrelevant to the understanding of the real world. Economics and Reality traces this irrelevance to the failure of economists to match their methods with their subject, showing that formal, mathematical models are unsuitable to the social realities economists purport to address. Tony Lawson examines the various ways in which mainstream economics is rooted in positivist philosophy and examines the problems this causes. It focuses on (...)
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  33. added 2014-08-16
    Why Economics is Not a Science of Behaviour.Marek Hudík - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (2):147-162.
    The paper criticises psychologism, i.e. the idea that economics is a science of behaviour or that it must be rooted in such a science. The argument is based on Hayek and Popper's thesis that economics studies spontaneous order. First, it is argued that if economics is to retain its traditional distance from psychology, it has to abandon the notion that it is concerned with behaviour. Then it is shown that there is no simple one-way causation from the psychological to the (...)
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  34. added 2014-08-14
    La neutralité axiologique, une exigence épistémologique ou éthique?Marc-Kevin Daoust - 2013 - In Éliot Litalien (ed.), Peut-on tirer une éthique de l'observation de la nature? Les Cahiers d'Ithaque. pp. 07-23.
    L’objectif de cette article est de comprendre la neutralité axiologique non pas comme une exigence épistémologique, mais plutôt comme un idéal éducationnel. Max Weber propose une science basée sur la description factuelle, de laquelle on exclut la formulation de jugements de valeur. Or, il faut démontrer pourquoi il est préférable de séparer les jugements descriptifs des jugements évaluatifs. L’objectif de Weber est de préserver l'autonomie intellectuelle des étudiants. Pour Weber, la classe et l'académie en général sont des lieux politiques. Ces (...)
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  35. added 2014-08-13
    A Skirmish in the Popper Wars: Hutchison Versus Caldwell on Hayek, Popper, Mises, and Methodology.Bruce Caldwell - 2009 - Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (3):315-324.
    The paper is a reminiscence of T.W. Hutchison by way of a retrospective view of our debate over the relationship between the ideas of Karl Popper, F. A. Hayek, and Ludwig von Mises on methodology. Our dispute was part of a larger debate over the relevance of Popper's thought for economic methodology. Its place within the larger debate is also explored.
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  36. added 2014-06-18
    Symposium: Data Mining.Roger E. Backhouse - 2000 - Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (2):171-277.
  37. added 2014-04-02
    Samuelson's Operationalist-Descriptivist Thesis.Joshua Cohen - 1995 - Journal of Economic Methodology 2 (1):53-78.
    This paper explores the influence of operationalism and its corollary, descriptivism, on Paul Samuelson's revealed preference theory as it developed between 1937 and 1948. Samuelson urged the disencumbering of metaphysics from economic theory. As an illustration, he showed how utility could be operationally redefined as revealed preference, and, furthermore, how from hypotheses such as maximizing behavior, operationally meaningful theorems could be deduced, thereby satisfying his demand for a scientific, empirical approach toward consumer behavior theory. In this paper I discuss the (...)
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  38. added 2014-03-24
    A Conversation with Terence Hutchison.John Hart - 2002 - Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (3):359-377.
    The pigeonholing of Hutchison's methodology as positivist, ultra-empiricist or Popperian has militated against a full appreciation of his more complex position. In this as-verbatim-as-possible account of an afternoon's discussion with Hutchison, it is the directly personal manner in which we gain insights, rather than simply the insights themselves, that we hope will help towards a re-assessment. We learn of his non-positivist view that economics is an empirical-historical discipline distinct from the natural sciences; and his rejection of Popper's view that prediction (...)
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  39. added 2014-03-23
    Terence Hutchison's 1938 Essay: Towards a Reappraisal.John Hart - 2003 - Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (3):353-373.
    Terence Hutchison's 1938 essay has been variously interpreted as introducing positivism, ultra?empiricism and Popperian falsificationism into economics. This paper argues that such interpretations are unfair and inaccurate. Moreover, they distract from his central message. The paper is divided into three main sections. The first seeks to demonstrate the extent to which Hutchison's essay differs from these previous interpretations. The second argues that Hutchison's central concern was to highlight and demonstrate the inadequacies of the traditional deductive method of?classical? economics. The third (...)
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  40. added 2014-03-22
    Reorienting Economics: Some Epistemological Issues.Sheila C. Dow - 2004 - Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (3):307-312.
    Criticizes the book "Reorienting Economics," by Tony Lawson. Emphasis on the character of the middle ground between positivism and relativism; Conception of reality implicit in economic practice; Inconsistency between the methodology of orthodox economics.
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  41. added 2014-03-20
    What Do Economists Analyze and Why: Values or Facts?Partha Dasgupta - 2005 - Economics and Philosophy 21 (2):221-278.
    Social thinkers frequently remind us that people differ in their views on what constitutes personal well-being, but that even when they don't differ, they disagree over the extent to which one person's well-being can be permitted to be traded off against another's. In this paper I show, by offering an account of the development of development economics, that in professional debates on social policy, economists speak or write as though they agree on values but differ on their reading of facts. (...)
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  42. added 2014-03-10
    Machlup's Misrepresentation of Hutchison's Methodology.John Hart - 2009 - Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (3):325-340.
    Hutchison's 1938 essay has been mainly interpreted as introducing positivism and ultra-empiricism into economics. Such interpretations misrepresent his position. While he clearly drew on logical positivism, his methodology stems from a more moderate form of empiricism. However the issue at stake is not the exact degree of Hutchison's empiricism, but rather the extent to which such negative labelling has trivialised his position and distracted attention from the main concern of his 1938 essay. This was to mount a sustained and systematic (...)
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  43. added 2014-03-10
    Realism and Relevance in the Economics of a Free Society: The Knight–Hutchison Debate.Ross B. Emmett - 2009 - Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (3):341-350.
    The methodological debate between Frank Knight and Terence Hutchison is usually framed in terms of the philosophical debates between positivism and intuitionism, or between empirical knowledge and theoretical knowledge. Hutchison's argument was, after all, a defense of the need for empirically-based economic knowledge, using the justificatory framework provided by logical positivism, and Knight was widely known for his defense of the understanding of economic theory often associated with Lionel Robbins. But the dispute between Knight and Hutchison was much more than (...)
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  44. added 2014-03-07
    Terence Hutchison and Frank Knight: A Reappraisal of Their 1940–1941 Exchange.John Hart - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (4):359-373.
    The person arguably most responsible for the view of Hutchison as the positivist who introduced positivism into economics was Frank Knight. I argue that Knight in 1940 failed to demonstrate that Hutchison was a positivist, at least in the narrow logical positivist sense of the term. By questioning Knight's charge, I aim to challenge the conventional wisdom that identifies?Hutchison? with?positivism?. The paper is then a first step in the argument that positivism, even in 1938, played only an inessential role in (...)
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  45. added 2014-03-04
    Reviews: Milton's Positivism Found Wanting. [REVIEW]D. Hammes - 2011 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (3):398-419.
    Milton Friedman’s 1953 essay created controversy and consternation amongst economists. It provided a prescription, based on empirically generated predictive success, of how to do economics, yet many saw it as a concession of the search for truth and theoretical beauty within the discipline. This article reviews a 50th anniversary festschrift devoted to views of the essay. The purpose of the volume is to provide today’s reader with the essay, responses, and a guide to interpreting it. The volume is selective and (...)
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  46. added 2013-07-15
    Austrian Economics and Austrian Philosophy.Barry Smith - 1986 - In Wolfgang Grassl & Barry Smith (eds.), Austrian Economics: Historical and Philosophical Background. London: Croom Helm. pp. 1-36.
    Austrian economics starts out from the thesis that the objects of economic science differ from those of the natural sciences because of the centrality of the economic agent. This allows a certain a priori or essentialistic aspect to economic science of a sort which parallels the a priori dimension of psychology defended by Brentano and his student Edmund Husserl. We outline these parallels, and show how the theory of a priori dependence relations outlined in Husserl’s Logical Investigations can throw light (...)
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  47. added 2013-04-15
    Kuhn's Paradigms and Neoclassical Economics: Reply to Dow.George Argyrous - 1994 - Economics and Philosophy 10 (1):123.
  48. added 2012-10-06
    Neoclassical Economics.Michael Moehler & Geoffrey Brennan - 2010 - In Mark Bevir (ed.), Encyclopedia of Political Theory. SAGE Publications.
    The term neoclassical economics delineates a distinct and relatively homogenous school of thought in economic theory that became prominent in the late nineteenth century and that now dominates mainstream economics. The term was originally introduced by Thorstein Veblen to describe developments in the discipline (of which Veblen did not entirely approve) associated with the work of such figures as William Jevons, Carl Menger, and Leon Walras. The ambition of these figures, the first neoclassicists, was to formalize and mathematize the subject (...)
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  49. added 2012-05-06
    PHD Thesis Summary: Intellectual Paths and Pathologies: How Small Events in Scholarly Life Accidentally Grow Big (2009).Altug Yalcintas - 2010 - Erasmus Journal of Philosophy and Economics 3 (1):123-125.
  50. added 2012-03-30
    Value Judgements and Value Neutrality in Economics.Philippe Mongin - 2006 - Economica 73 (290):257-286.
    The paper analyses economic evaluations by distinguishing evaluative statements from actual value judgments. From this basis, it compares four solutions to the value neutrality problem in economics. After rebutting the strong theses about neutrality (normative economics is illegitimate) and non-neutrality (the social sciences are value-impregnated), the paper settles the case between the weak neutrality thesis (common in welfare economics) and a novel, weak non-neutrality thesis that extends the realm of normative economics more widely than the other weak thesis does.
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