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  1. Wu-Wei in "the Art of Rulership" Chapter of Huai Nan Tzu: Its Sources and Philosophical Orientation.Roger T. Ames - 1981 - Philosophy East and West 31 (2):193-213.
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  2. Restoring Dong Zhongshu : An Experiment in Historical and Philosophical Reconstruction.Gary Arbuckle - 1991 - Dissertation, The University of British Columbia (Canada)
    Dong Zhongshu is generally acknowledged as the most important Confucian philosopher of the Former Han dynasty and is usually assigned a key role in the adaptation of Confucian thought to the demands of the centralized imperial state. However, recent research has brought his contribution to this process into question. ;The dissertation is divided into four parts. In the first, I reconstruct the events of Dong's life. I review all evidence on his dates of birth and death, his service in the (...)
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  3. On a Comprehensive Theory of Xing (Naturality) in Song-Ming Neo-Confucian Philosophy: A Critical and Integrative Development.Chung-ying Cheng - 1997 - Philosophy East and West 47 (1):33-46.
    The question of xing has received much attention in the revival of Neo-Confucian philosophy (called Contemporary Neo-Confucianism) in present-day Taiwan, Hong Kong, and China and among scholars of Chinese philosophy in the United States. It also has much to do with a critical consciousness of both the difference and the affinity between the Chinese philosophy of man and morality and the contemporary Western philosophy of human existence and moral virtues. The study of this has great meaning for the development of (...)
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  4. The Role of History in the Philosophy of Dong Zhongshu.Zhang Chunbo - 1980 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 12 (2):87-103.
    Dong Zhongshu [c. 179-104 B.C.] was China's greatest idealist philosopher of the Western Han dynasty. Since Liberation, a great number of people have written works analyzing and criticizing the philosophical thought of Dong Zhongshu revealing its idealistic and metaphysical nature. This is absolutely essential. But is there nothing at all that we can take from the philosophy of Dong Zhongshu? I believe that this merits further research. In fact, the teleology and metaphysical world view of his idealistic pantheism played a (...)
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  5. Dong Zhongshu: A 'Confucian' Heritage and the Chunqiu Fanlu by Michael Loewe (Review).Paul Fischer - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2):306-308.
    In Dong Zhongshu: A 'Confucian' Heritage and the Chunqiu Fanlu, eminent sinologist Michael Loewe shines a bright light on the traditionally seminal but consistently understudied figure of Dong Zhongshu. Having authored several monographs on the Han dynasty over the last four decades, including a recent two-volume Biographical Dictionary (2000) and a "Companion" to those volumes (2004),1 there is probably no one more suitable to undertake such an inquiry. Loewe's contextualization of Dong and the Chunqiu fanlu is thoroughly detailed and well (...)
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  6. Investigations Into the Authenticity of the Chang San-Feng Ch Uan-Chi the Complete Works of Chang San-Feng.Zhaohan Huang - 1982
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  7. I Han Hsüeh.Tung Hui - 1937 - Shang Wu Yin Shu Kuan.
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  8. Han Tang Si Xiang Shi Gao.Meng Ji - 2010 - Xiu Wei Zi Xun Ke Ji Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.
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  9. A Festchrift for Dong-Whee Yang.Young-Sun Kim, Byung-Choon Lee, Kyoung-Jae Lee, Kyun-Kwon Yang & Jong-Kuri Yoon (eds.) - 1995 - Hankuk Publishing.
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  10. The Idea of Resonance in the Huai-Nan Tzu. With a Translationand Analysis of Huai-Nan Tzu Chapter Six.Charles Yvon Le Blanc - 1978 - Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania
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  11. Dong Zhongshu, a “Confucian” Heritage and the Chunqiu Fanlu. By Michael Loewe.Garret Olberding - 2014 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (1-2):207-210.
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  12. Sun Zhongshan de Huo Dong Yu Si Xiang.Bing Sang - 2001
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  13. Zhu Xi Yan Jiu.Jingnan Shu - 2008 - Ren Min Chu Ban She.
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  14. Readings in Later Chinese Philosophy.Justin Tiwald & Bryan W. Van Norden (eds.) - 2014 - Hackett.
    An exceptional contribution to the teaching and study of Chinese thought, this anthology provides fifty-eight selections arranged chronologically in five main sections: Han Thought, Chinese Buddhism, Neo-Confucianism, Late Imperial Confucianism, and the early Twentieth Century. The editors have selected writings that have been influential, that are philosophically engaging, and that can be understood as elements of an ongoing dialogue, particularly on issues regarding ethical cultivation, human nature, virtue, government, and the underlying structure of the universe. Within those topics, issues of (...)
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  15. Dong Zhongshu's Transformation of Yin-Yang Theory and Contesting of Gender Identity.Robin Wang - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2):209-231.
    Dong Zhongshu was the first prominent Confucian to integrate yin-yang theory into Confucianism. His constructive effort not only generates a new perspective on yin and yang, it also involves implications beyond its explicit contents. First, Dong changes the natural harmony of yin and yang to an imposed unity. Second, he identifies yang with human nature and benevolence, and yin with emotion and greed. Taken together, these two novelties grant a philosophical basis for the theory and practice of gender inequality in (...)
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  16. Feng Guifen Ping Zhuan.Xiong Yuezhi - 2004 - Nanjing da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  17. Liang Han Wei Jin Zhe Xue Shi.Haichun Zeng - 2008 - Wu Nan Tu Shu Chu Ban Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.
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  18. Gu Yanwu Yu Zhongguo Wen Hua.Kezhen Zhou - 2009 - Huang Shan Shu She.
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Yin Yang Confucianism
  1. "Symbolic Reference" and Prognostication in the Yijing.James Behuniak Jr - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (2):223–237.
  2. Inner Truth and the Origin of the Yarrow Stalk Oracle.Chappell Brown - 1982 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (2):197-210.
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  3. Deconstruction, Yin-Yang, and Negative Theology.Jie-Wei Cheng - 1995 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (3):263-287.
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  4. Indian Yoni-Linga and Chinese Yin-Yang.Ding John Zijiang - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 4 (8):20-26.
    Indian philosophy of Yoni-Linga may be examined as a parallel to the Chinese philosophy of “Yin-Yang.” This essay will compare the similarities and distinctions between the two kinds of dichotomies through a theoretical formulation: certain conceptual, analytical and cross-cultural perspectives. The study will be focused on semiologieal, aesthetical, ontological and theological comparisons between these two of the most famous pairs of conceptual antonyms which have been developed by later Sino-Hindu philosophies and theologies as human worldviews widened and deepened with Eastern (...)
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  5. Dong Zhongshu, a "Confucian" Heritage and the Chun Qiu Fan Lu.Michael Loewe - 2011 - Brill.
    The assumption that a system described as ‘Confucianism’ formulated by Dong Zhongshu became accepted as the norm during the Western Han dynasty (202 BCE – 9 CE) is challenged and his supposed authorship of the Chunqiu fanlu examined.
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  6. Neo-Confucians and Zhu Xi on Family and Woman: Challenges and Potentials,”.Ann A. Pang-White - 2016 - In The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Chinese Philosophy and Gender. pp. 69-88.
    In Chinese philosophy’s encounter with modernity and feminist discourse, Neo-Confucianism often suffered the most brutal attacks and criticisms. In “Neo-Confucians and Zhu Xi on Family and Woman: Challenges and Potentials,” Ann A. Pang-White investigates Song Neo-Confucians’ views (in particular, that of Zhu Xi) on women by examining the Classifi ed Conversations of Zhu Xi (Zhuzi Yulei), the Reflections on Things at Hand (Jinsi Lu), Further Reflections on Things at Hand (Xu Jinsi Lu), and other texts. Pang-White also takes a close (...)
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  7. The Concept of ch'I in the Thought of Wang Ch'ung.Lee Rainey - 1992 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 19 (3):263-284.
  8. The Concepts of Wu-Hsing and Yin-Yang.Vital Y. A. Rubin - 1982 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (2):131-157.
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  9. Wang Ch'ung's Anti-Confucian Struggle.Chung Ta - 1976 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 7 (4):57-68.
    Wang Ch'ung, a materialist of the early Eastern Han period, was a progressive thinker who publicly raised the militant banner of "attacking Confucius" and "criticizing Mencius.".
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  10. Yinyang: The Way of Heaven and Earth in Chinese Thought and Culture.Robin R. Wang - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    The concept of yinyang lies at the heart of Chinese thought and culture. The relationship between these two opposing, yet mutually dependent, forces is symbolized in the familiar black and white symbol that has become an icon in popular culture across the world. The real significance of yinyang is, however, more complex and subtle. This brilliant and comprehensive analysis by one of the leading authorities in the field captures the richness and multiplicity of the meanings and applications of yinyang, including (...)
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  11. Five Lost Classics: Tao, Huanglao, and Yin-Yang in Han China.Robin D. S. Yates (ed.) - 1997 - Ballantine Books.
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Dong Zhongshu
  1. Dong Zhongshu's Transformation of "Yin-Yang" Theory and Contesting of Gender Identity.Robin Wang - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2):209 - 231.
    Dong Zhongshu (Tung Chung-shu) (179-104 B.C.E.) was the first prominent Confucian to integrate yin-yang theory into Confucianism. His constructive effort not only generates a new perspective on yin and yang, it also involves implications beyond its explicit contents. First, Dong changes the natural harmony (he ネᄆ) of yin and yang to an imposed unity (he 合). Second, he identifies yang with human nature (xing) and benevolence (ren), and yin with emotion (qing) and greed (tan). Taken together, these novelties grant a (...)
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  2. Dong Zhongshu's Transformation Of.Robin Wang - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2).
    : Dong Zhongshu (Tung Chung-shu) (179–104 B.C.E.) was the first prominent Confucian to integrate yin-yang theory into Confucianism. His constructive effort not only generates a new perspective on yin and yang, it also involves implications beyond its explicit contents. First, Dong changes the natural harmony of yin and yang to an imposed unity Second, he identifies yang with human nature (xing) and benevolence (ren), and yin with emotion (qing) and greed (tan). Taken together, these two novelties grant a philosophical basis (...)
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Neo-Daoism
  1. The Huai-Nan Tzu Alteration.Wayne Alt - 1993 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 20 (1):73-84.
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  2. 'The Art of Rulership' Chapter of the Huai Nan Tzu: A Practicable Taoism.Roger T. Ames - 1981 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 8 (2):225-244.
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  3. Understanding Double Mystery: Daoism in Early Tang as Mirrored in the Fdlh (T 2104) and Chongxuanxue.Friederike Assandri - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (3):427–440.
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  4. Guo Xiang.J. Scot Brackenridge - 2007 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  5. Meontology in Early Xuanxue Thought.David Chai - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (1):90-101.
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  6. Musical Naturalism in the Thought of Ji Kang.David Chai - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (2):151-171.
    Wei-Jin period is characterized by neo-Daoism ( xuanxue 玄學), and J I Kang lived in the midst of this philosophical exploration. Adopting the naturalism of the Zhuangzi , J i Kang expressed his socio-political concerns through the medium of music, which was previously regarded as having moral bearing and rectitude. Denying such rectitude became central for J i Kang, who claimed that music was incapable of possessing human emotion, releasing it from the chains of Confucian ritualism. His investigation into the (...)
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  7. Neo-Daoism.Alan K. L. Chan - 2008 - In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
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  8. Zhong Hui (Chung Hui, 225–264 CE).Alan Kam-Leung Chan - 2007 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  9. Wang Pi on the Mind.Chung-Yue Chang - 1982 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (1):77-106.
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  10. Ziporyn, Brook, the Penumbra Unbound: The Neo-Taoist Philosophy of Guo Xiang.Paul D’Ambrosio & Hans-Georg Moeller - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):437-440.
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  11. Insidious Syncretism in the Political Philosophy of Huai-Nan-Tzu.Paul Rakita Goldin - 1999 - Asian Philosophy 9 (3):165 – 191.
    This is a study of the ninth chapter of the Huai-nan-tzu, a Chinese philosophical text compiled in the mid-second century BC. The chapter (entitled Chu-shu [The techniques of the ruler]) has been consistently interpreted as a proposal for a benign government that is rooted in the syncretic Taoist principles of the Huai-nan-tzu and is designed to serve the best interests of the people. I argue, on the contrary, that the text makes skilful (and deliberately deceptive) use of vocabulary from the (...)
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  12. His K'ang and Argumentation in the Wei, and a Refutation of the Essay 'Residence is Unrelated to Good and Bad Fortune: Nourish Life'.Robert Henricks - 1981 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 8 (2):169-223.
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  13. The Categorical Interpretation of Guo Xiang's “Independent Genesis”.Zhongqian Kang - 2008 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (4):520-534.
    Seemingly, “independent genesis” refers to the independent existence and changes of each thing, but it is clear that there cannot be any truly “independent” things at all. Each thing in the world has to stay in connection or relationship with other things outside itself if it wants to represent its own “independence” and “genesis” in terms of form; and inevitably such connection or relationship itself has to be embodied in the internal nature of each thing. In the metaphysical thought of (...)
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  14. Ge Hong.Keith Knapp - 2003 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  15. Kuo Hsiang and the Chuang Tzu.Livia Knaul - 1985 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (4):429-447.
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  16. The Nameless and Formless Dao as Metaphor and Imagery: Modeling the Dao in Wang Bi's Laozi.Jude Chua Soo Meng - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (3):477–492.
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  17. Littlejohn, Ronnie, and Jeffrey Dippmann, Ed., Riding the Wind With Liezi. New Perspectives on the Daoist Classic.Hans-Georg Moeller - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (3):405-408.
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  18. Continuity-Guo Xiang, Chan, Cheng-Zhu Lixue, New Realism, Marxism-Feng Youlan's Discernment of the Way.Diane B. Obenchacm - 1994 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 21 (3-4):481-519.
  19. The Concept of Human Nature in the Huai-Nan Tzu.H. D. Roth - 1985 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (1):1-22.
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