This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

193 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 193
Material to categorize
  1. Pragmatic Arguments in the Qur'an for Belief.M. Shahid Alam - manuscript
  2. Taking Stock of Infinite Value: Pascal’s Wager and Relative Utilities.P. Bartha - 2007 - Synthese 154 (1):5-52.
    Among recent objections to Pascal's Wager, two are especially compelling. The first is that decision theory, and specifically the requirement of maximizing expected utility, is incompatible with infinite utility values. The second is that even if infinite utility values are admitted, the argument of the Wager is invalid provided that we allow mixed strategies. Furthermore, Hájek has shown that reformulations of Pascal's Wager that address these criticisms inevitably lead to arguments that are philosophically unsatisfying and historically unfaithful. Both the objections (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3. Wager.Simon Blackburn - 2008 - In exploring philosophy of religion.
  4. Treatment Option or Pharmacological Wager?Ann Boyd - 2013 - Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 4 (4).
  5. What Is Mormon Transhumanism?Lincoln Cannon - 2015 - Theology and Science 13 (2):202-218.
    Mormon transhumanism is the idea that humanity should learn how to be compassionate creators. This idea is essential to Mormonism, which provides a religious framework consistent with naturalism and supportive of human transformation. Mormon transhumanists are not limited to traditional or popular accounts of religion, and embrace opportunities and risks of technological evolution. Although usually considered secular, transhumanism has some religious origins and sometimes functions as religion. Accelerating change contextualizes a Mormon transhumanist narrative of common expectations, aspirations, and parallels between (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Is the Wager Back On? A Response to Douglas Groothuis.A. B. Carter - 2002 - Philosophia Christi 4 (2):493-500.
  7. Pascal's Syndrome: Positivism as a Symptom of Depression and Mania.Hiram Caton - 1986 - Zygon 21 (3):319-351.
    . The present study applies results and methods of psychobiology to intellectual history. Pascal's syndrome is a depressive neurosis associated with morbid effects of scientific certainty. The syndrome is characterized by self‐mortification and conversion experience that represses distressing certainties. The dynamics of the syndrome are assessed from Blake Pascal's psychosis. The ideation of the syndrome is evaluated by reference to the neurology of altered states of consciousness and the biogenic amine hypothesis of depression and mania. The evaluation yields a description (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Pascal on Self-Caused Belief.Stephen T. Davis - 1991 - Religious Studies 27 (1):27 - 37.
  9. Morality and Method in Pascal's.Ann T. Delehanty - 2004 - Philosophy and Literature 28 (1).
    : This essay argues that Pascal's work both questions the accuracy of perspective in an infinite universe, and describes a model for moral truth that escapes the limitations of perspective. This model, rooted in Christianity, requires a total reorientation of approach towards moral truth. By asserting the limits of rational method, making use of recent scientific developments, and constructing a new model for moral truth, Pascal's work sought to update the role of Christianity to be not only consonant with the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. A PHILOSOPHICAL ENQUIRY INTO THE SCANDAL OF EVIL AND SUFFERING.Edvard Kristian Foshaugen - 2004 - Baptis Journal South Africa (q):q.
    In 1 Peter 1:3-7 we read that the Christians were facing persecution because of their faith and the author reminds them that every trial is a test of their faith. The trials and consequential suffering can be withstood because they are able to look forward to an inheritance – eternal life with God. Christians can endure all trials and suffering because of the hope of glory and ultimate joy. There is a grace afforded by God in the presence to match (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Christian Witness in the 21 Century - Incarnantional Engaged Approach.Edvard Kristian Foshaugen - 1997 - Dissertation, Free State University
    Research for this study was served by the hypothesis that the Christian’s lifestyle and witness in a postmodern world will depend on the definition and practice of worship and spirituality. The Old Testament reveals a spirituality that has ‘Yahweh’ involved in all aspects of life. Awareness and experience of the presence of God is linked to obedience to God. New Testament spirituality implies imitation of Christ and an effort to obey Christ's twofold command: to love God and neighbor as self. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. The Science of Conjecture: Probability Before Pascal: Contents.James Franklin - 2001 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
    The Dark Ages The Gregorian Revolution The Glossators Invent "Half-Proof" Presumptions in Canon Law Innocent III Grades of Evidence, and Torture The Post-Glossators Bartolus and Baldus: The Completed Theory The Inquisition Maimonides on Testimony Law in the East Ch. 3 Renaissance Law..
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Loki's Wager and Laudan's Error.On Genuine & Territorial Demarcation - 2013 - In Massimo Pigliucci & Maarten Boudry (eds.), Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem. University of Chicago Press. pp. 79.
  14. Pragmatic Justification of Religious Faith.Joshua Lewis Golding - 1982 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    Pascal's Wager is analyzed and critiqued in Part I. The main objections to Pascal's argument are raised and various attempts to salvage the argument are discussed. These problems include the dubious assumption that one is forced to believe either that God exists or that God does not exist, and the questionable assumption that one will gain infinite happiness if and only if God exists and one believes in God's existence. Also problematic is the use of an infinite value in an (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. An Unwarranted Farewell to Pascal's Wager: A Reply to Alan Carter.Douglas Groothius - 2002 - Philosophia Christi 4 (2):501-508.
  16. Wagering Belief: Examining Two Objections to Pascal's Wager: D. GROOTHUIS.D. Groothuis - 1994 - Religious Studies 30 (4):479-486.
    This paper concerns two objections to Pascal's wager. The first claims that Pascal's recommendation to habituate oneself to believe in God is tantamount to religious brainwashing. I argue that this construal misses important aspects of what Pascal had in mind, which may render the habituation process a legitimate means to acquire new understanding. The second objection is based on the idea that a key assumption of the wager – that theistic belief is required for eternal felicity – is morally absurd. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Are All Bets Off? A Defense of Pascal’s Wager.Douglas Groothuis - 2001 - Philosophia Christi 3 (2):517-524.
  18. To Prove or Not to Prove: Pascal on Natural Theology.Douglas Richard Groothuis - 1993 - Dissertation, University of Oregon
    In this dissertation I argue that Pascal's reasons for rejecting the enterprise of natural theology are inadequate to negate the discipline's possible value for Christian theism. ;I begin by explaining the nature, function, and scope of natural theology or the attempt to argue for God's existence apart from revelation. ;Pascal argues that the Bible itself precludes the activity of natural theology. I dispute this claim by giving reasons why the omission of natural in the Bible does not mean that the (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Vom Literarischen Diskurs Zum Christlichen Aufruf. Uberlegungen Zum Ersten Teil der von Pascal Provisorisch Geordneten Pensées (Du Discours Littéraire À l'Exhortation Chrétienne. Réflexions Sur la 1 Partie des Pensées Dans Leur Ordre Provisoire).P. Grotzer - 1988 - Theologie Und Philosophie 63 (3):370-383.
  20. Motion and Rest in the Pensées – a Note on Pascal's Modernism.Graeme Hunter - 2000 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 47 (2):87-99.
  21. Faith as a Mustard Seed.Dale Jacquette - 2012 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 17 (2):141-173.
  22. Pragmatic Arguments and Belief.Jeff Jordan - 1996 - American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (4):409 - 420.
  23. Duff and the Wager.Jeff Jordan - 1991 - Analysis 51 (3):174 - 176.
  24. Pascal's Argument of Stake.R. Jurecka - 2000 - Filosoficky Casopis 48 (4):541-556.
  25. Pascalův Argument Sázky.Richard JureČka - 2000 - Filosoficky Casopis 48:541-556.
  26. N. Rescher, "Pascal's Wager: A Study of Practical Reasoning in Philosophical Theology".C. D. Kay - 1987 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 22 (1/2):112.
  27. Scepticism and Mathematization: Pascal and Peirce on Mathematical Epistemology.Johannes Lenhard - 2004 - Philosophica 74.
    In his Pensées, Pascal introduced the very influential distinction between the subtle intelligence and the geometrical intelligence. In the first part of the present paper Pascal’s distinction is considered by looking at his famous wager argument where Pascal acts as a skeptical philosopher and at the same time as an applied mathematician. This argument employs the esprit de finesse in a way that is of fundamental significance for the epistemology of mathematics. This claim will be backed up in the second (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Tragic Closure and the Cornelian Wager.John Lyons - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:409.
  29. The Precautionary Principle, the Catastrophe Argument, and Pascal's Wager.Neil Manson - 1999 - Ends and Means 4 (1).
  30. Pragmatic Decisions About God From Different Points of View: The Costs of Apostasy.Cei Maslen - 2016 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 80 (2):103-113.
    Pascal, with his famous wager, argued in favour of religious practice and faith by appeal to expected payoffs. Here I discuss an asymmetry in similar pragmatic arguments for decisions about God. I begin with the observation that apostates pay costs not shared by those who never adopt a religion in the first place. Noticing this asymmetry shows these arguments from a new perspective and may also contribute to an explanation of the endurance of religion.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Pascal on Certainty and Utility.John C. McCarthy - 1995 - Interpretation 22 (2):247-269.
  32. Pascal and the Nature of Belief.W. Moore - 1945 - Hibbert Journal 44:353-357.
  33. W. K. Clifford and William James on Doxastic Norms.Alberto Oya - forthcoming - Comprendre.
    The main aim of this paper is to explain and analyze the debate between W. K. Clifford ("The Ethics of Belief", 1877) and William James ("The Will to Believe", 1896). Given that the main assumption shared by Clifford and James in this debate is doxastic voluntarism –i.e., the claim that we can, at least in some occasions, willingly decide what to believe–, I will explain the arguments offered by Bernard Williams in his “Deciding to Believe” (1973) against doxastic voluntarism. Finally, (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Introducció. El debat entre W. K. Clifford i William James.Alberto Oya - 2016 - Quaderns de Filosofia i Ciència (2):123-127.
    In this paper I comment on the debate between W. K. Clifford ("The Ethics of Belief", 1877) and William James ("The Will to Believe", 1896). I argue that both authors assume doxastic voluntarism -i.e., the claim that we can, at least in some occasions, willingly decide what to believe- and I argue that doxastic voluntarism is unacceptable.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Pascal.J. J. R. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (4):742-742.
  36. Search, Rest, and Grace in Pascal.Jennifer L. Soerensen - 2014 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 76 (1):19-40.
    For Pascal, how are human beings related, or how do they relate themselves, to the summum bonum in this life? In what sense do they share in it, and how do they come to share in it? These are questions that emerge in many ways in Pascal’s writing, significantly in his concept of repos. To answer these questions, especially by elucidating what repos is for human beings in this life, I would like to begin with Graeme Hunter’s “Motion and Rest (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Henryk Elzenberg Wager for Values. Axiological and Methodological Aspects.Krzysztof Stachewicz - 2009 - Dialogue and Universalism 19 (8-9):39-47.
    The wager for values proposed by Henryk Elzenberg seems to be an interesting and important problem in axiological thinking. That is why one should take a close look at Elzenberg’s reasoning and at certain consequences of such point of view. We analyze this problem as a parallel to Pascal’s Wager for God. One should live and act as if God existed—it is an effect of Pascal’s Wager. One should live and behave as if perfect values existed—this is the essence of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. The Christian Wager.R. G. Swinburne - 1984 - In J. Houston (ed.), Religious Studies. Handsel Press. pp. 217--228.
  39. Pascalian Fictions Antagonism and Absent Agency in the Wager and Other Pensées. Van Kelly - 1992
  40. The Metaphysical Structure of Pascal Theology.G. Varani - 1984 - Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane 13 (1):79-97.
  41. Infinite Return: Two Ways of Wagering with Pascal: James Wetzel.James Wetzel - 1993 - Religious Studies 29 (2):139-149.
    Pascal's wager has fascinated philosophers far in excess of its reputation as effective apologetics. Very few of the wager's defenders, in fact, have retained more than an academic interest in its power to persuade. Partly this is a matter of good manners. Pascal is supposed to have pitched his wager at folks who understand only self-interested motivations, and today it is no longer fashionable for defenders of theism to disparage the character of their opponents. But partly the low-key concern with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Wetsel, David. Pascal and Disbelief: Catechesis and Conversion in the Pensées.Timothy J. Williams - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (2):428-429.
  43. What is the Self? Imitation and Subjectivity in Blaise Pascal's Pensées.William Wood - 2010 - Modern Theology 26 (3):417-436.
  44. The Will to Come Out All Right.Herb Yarvin - 1976 - Religious Studies 12 (3):303.
    William James presents Pascal's wager in this manner: if you believe in God and God exists, then your gain is infinite; if you believe in God and God doesn't exist, then your loss is finite. Therefore, since a finite loss is reasonable where there is the possibility of infinite gain, you ought to believe in God. ‘What have you to lose?’ James asks . 1.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
Pascal's Wager
  1. Pascal's Wager Revisited.Robert P. Amico - 1994 - International Studies in Philosophy 26 (2):1-11.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Review: Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God - by Jeff Jordan. [REVIEW]Robert Anderson - 2008 - Philosophical Books 49 (1):94-96.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Recent Criticisms and Defenses of Pascal's Wager.Robert Anderson - 1995 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 37 (1):45 - 56.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4. "Infini Rien": Pascal's Wager and the Human Paradox.Leslie Armour - 1993 - Southern Illinois University.
    The wager fragment in Blaise Pascal’s _Penseés _opens with the phrase "_infini rien_"—"infinite nothing"—which is meant to describe the human condition. Pascal was responding to what was, even in the seventeenth century, becoming a pressing human problem: we seem to be able to know much about the world but less about ourselves. The traditional European view of human beings as creatures made in the image of God and potentially capable of a mystical union with God was increasingly confounded by the (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Betting on God: Why Considerations of Simplicity Won't Help.Bradley Armour-Garb - 1999 - Religious Studies 35 (2):119-138.
    In his famous Wager, Blaise Pascal attempted to adduce prudential grounds on which to base a belief in God. His argument founders, however, on the notorious 'Many Gods Problem', the problem of selecting among the many equiprobable gods on offer. Lycan and Schlesinger try to treat the Many Gods Problem as a problem of empirical over-determination, attempting to overcome it using methodologies familiar from empirical science. I argue that their strategy fails, but that the Many Gods Problem can be solved (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. On the Validity of Pascal's Wager.Antony Aumann - 2014 - Heythrop Journal 55 (1):86-93.
    Recent scholarship has shown that the success of Pascal’s wager rests on precarious grounds. To avoid notorious problems, it must appeal to considerations such as what probability we assign to the existence of various gods and what religion we think provides the greatest happiness in this life. Rational judgments concerning these matters are subject to change over time. Some claim that the wager therefore cannot support a steadfast commitment to God. I argue that this conclusion does not follow. By drawing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 193