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  1. The Medical Record as Legal Document: When Can the Patient Dictate the Content? An Ethics Case From the Department of Neurology.R. Accordino, N. Kopple-Perry, N. Gligorov & S. Krieger - 2014 - Clinical Ethics 9 (1):53-56.
  2. Selling Orthodontic Need: Innocent Business Decision or Guilty Pleasure?M. B. Ackerman - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):275-278.
    The principal objective for most patients seeking orthodontic services is a detectable improvement in their dentofacial appearance. Orthodontic treatment, in the mind of the patient, is something that makes you look better, feel better about yourself, and perhaps enhances your social possibilities, ie, to find a companion or make a positive impression during a job interview. Orthodontics, as a speciality, has collectively advanced the idea that enhanced occlusion (bite) improves the health and longevity of the dentition, and as a result (...)
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  3. Why Doctors Should Intervene.Terrence F. Ackerman - 1982 - Hastings Center Report 12 (4):14-17.
  4. The Last Refuge of the Scoundrel.Joseph Agassi - 1974 - Philosophia 4 (2-3):315-317.
    Patriotism is a form of loyalty. The range of loyalty is from patriotism to friendship. Liberals were often accused of having no sense of loyalty. They usually tend to deny the charge — even while refusing to take a loyalty oath. Even the liberal philosopher Sir Karl Popper has claimed (Open Society, i, ch. 10), that liberals can be better patriots than others. 1 find this line of defense erroneous and morally wrong. I find it much nicer, much more honest, (...)
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  5. Why Quality Is Addressed So Rarely in Clinical Ethics Consultation.George J. Agich - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (4):339.
    In a practice like ethics consultation, quality and accountability are intertwined. Critics of ethics consultation have complained that clinical ethics consultants exercise power or influence in patient care without sufficient external oversight. Without oversight or external accountability, ethics consultation is seen as more sophistical than philosophical. Although there has been more discussion of accountability, concern for quality in ethics consultation is arguably more important, because it represents a central challenge for the field, namely, how to structure a responsible practice of (...)
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  6. Review of Linda Farber Post, Jeffrey Blustein, and Nancy Neveloff Dubler, Handbook for Healthcare Ethics Committees. [REVIEW]George J. Agich - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):66-67.
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  7. What Kind of Doing is Clinical Ethics?George J. Agich - 2004 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (1):7-24.
    This paper discusses the importance of Richard M. Zaners work on clinical ethics for answering the question: what kind of doing is ethics consultation? The paper argues first, that four common approaches to clinical ethics – applied ethics, casuistry, principlism, and conflict resolution – cannot adequately address the nature of the activity that makes up clinical ethics; second, that understanding the practical character of clinical ethics is critically important for the field; and third, that the practice of clinical ethics is (...)
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  8. Joining the Team: Ethics Consultation at the Cleveland Clinic. [REVIEW]George J. Agich - 2003 - HEC Forum 15 (4):310-322.
  9. The Question of Method in Ethics Consultation.George J. Agich - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):31 – 41.
    This paper offers an exposition of what the question of method in ethics consultation involves under two conditions: when ethics consultation is regarded as a practice and when the question of method is treated systematically. It discusses the concept of the practice and the importance of rules in constituting the actions, cognition, and perceptions of practitioners. The main body of the paper focuses on three elements of the question of method: canon, discipline, and history, which are treated heuristically to outline (...)
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  10. The Importance of Management for Understanding Managed Care.George J. Agich - 1999 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (5):518-534.
  11. From Pittsburgh to Cleveland: NHBD Controversies and Bioethics.George J. Agich - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (3):269-274.
    In March 1997, 60 Minutes, a nationally syndicated news magazine program, featured a story in which it was claimed that The Cleveland Clinic Foundation had in place a non-heart-beating donor protocol that involved killing patients for their organs. These charges were brought by a philosopher from a local university. A student who worked at LifeBanc, the northeastern Ohio organ procurement agency where the organ donation protocol originated, was given the protocol by LifeBanc with the understanding that it was to be (...)
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  12. Response to “From Pittsburgh to Cleveland: NHBD Controversies and Bioethics” by George J. Agich (CQ Vol 8, No 3).George J. Agich - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (4):517-523.
    Frank Koughan and Walt Bogdanich's response to my article, reminds me of the Shakespearean line, My article was not about the specifics of the 60Minutes April 13, 1997, story on NHBD at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF), even though the story formed the basis for the reflection. I did not attack the critics, though I do believe that bioethicists are accountable for their scholarly and public pronouncements. Although I do not see why the 60Minutes' story should be treated with deference, (...)
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  13. Professionalism and Ethics in Health Care.George J. Agich - 1980 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 5 (3):186-199.
  14. Accountability and Ministerial Advisors.Andrew Alexandra & Clare Mcardle - 2003 - Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 5 (2).
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  15. Common Morality and 'Institutionalising Ethics'.Andrew Alexandra & Seumas Miller - 2005 - Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 7 (1).
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  16. Needs, Moral Self-Consciousness, and Professional Roles.Andrew Alexandra & Seumas Miller - 1996 - Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 5 (1):43-61.
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  17. Collegial Professionalism.George Allan - 2000 - Process Studies 29 (2):374-375.
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  18. Forbidding Knowledge.Barry Allen - 1996 - The Monist 79 (2):294-310.
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  19. Detecting Duplication in Students’ Research Data: A Method and Illustration.Peter J. Allen, Amanda Lourenco & Lynne D. Roberts - forthcoming - Ethics and Behavior:1-12.
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  20. Improving Our Aim.Judith Andre, Leonard Fleck & Tom Tomlinson - 1999 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (2):130 – 147.
    Bioethicists appearing in the media have been accused of "shooting from the hip" (Rachels, 1991). The criticism is sometimes justified. We identify some reasons our interactions with the press can have bad results and suggest remedies. In particular we describe a target (fostering better public dialogue), obstacles to hitting the target (such as intrinsic and accidental defects in our knowledge) and suggest some practical ways to surmont those obstacles (including seeking out ways to write or speak at length, rather than (...)
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  21. Development Officers and Discrimination.William L. Barthelemy & Sheldon Wein - 1996 - Journal of Philosophical Research 21:433-443.
    This paper deals with what a government funded development agency should do when a developing country imposes restrictions on the development process which discriminate on the basis of gender against some members of the development agency’s staff. The conclusion is that there are circumstances in which development agencies should continue their work in the face of gender discrimination but they should not instigate development projects if doing so would involve them in gender discrimination. A set of procedures for a development (...)
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  22. Commentary on “the Social Responsibilities of Biological Scientists” (S. J. Reiser and R. E. Bulger).Jonathan Beckwith & Lisa N. Geller - 1997 - Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (2):145-148.
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  23. Clinical Care and Complicity with Torture.Zackary Berger, Leonard Rubenstein & Matt Decamp - 2018 - British Medical Journal 360:k449.
    The UN Convention against Torture defines torture as “any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person” by someone acting in an official capacity for purposes such as obtaining a confession or punishing or intimidating that person.1 It is unethical for healthcare professionals to participate in torture, including any use of medical knowledge or skill to facilitate torture or allow it to continue, or to be present during torture.2-7 Yet medical participation (...)
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  24. Metrics-Based Assessments of Research: Incentives for 'Institutional Plagiarism'?Colin Berry - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):337-340.
    The issue of plagiarism—claiming credit for work that is not one’s own, rightly, continues to cause concern in the academic community. An analysis is presented that shows the effects that may arise from metrics-based assessments of research, when credit for an author’s outputs (chiefly publications) is given to an institution that did not support the research but which subsequently employs the author. The incentives for what is termed here “institutional plagiarism” are demonstrated with reference to the UK Research Assessment Exercise (...)
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  25. Conscience and Conviction: The Case for Civil Disobedience.Kimberley Brownlee - 2012 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Oxford Legal Philosophy publishes the best new work in philosophically-oriented legal theory. It commissions and solicits monographs in all branches of the subject, including works on philosophical issues in all areas of public and private law, and in the national, transnational, and international realms; studies of the nature of law, legal institutions, and legal reasoning; treatments of problems in political morality as they bear on law; and explorations in the nature and development of legal philosophy itself. The series represents diverse (...)
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  26. Conscience Exemptions in Medicine: A Hegelian Feminist Perspective.Victoria I. Burke - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):267-287.
    In this article, I defend the view that conscience exemption clauses for medical practitioners (doctors, nurses, technicians, pharmacists) should be limited by patient protection clauses. This view was also defended by Mark Wicclair, in his book on conscience exemptions in medicine (Cambridge UP, 2011). In this article, I defend Wicclair’s view by supplementing it with Hegelian ethical theory and feminist critical theory. Conscience exemptions are important to support as a matter of human rights. They support an individual’s right to protect (...)
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  27. Remembering My Self: Priest, Philosopher, Human Being.Edmund Byrne - 2017 - Herndon, VA: Mascot Books.
    Some 120,000 priests have left the Catholic Church in the past 60 years, a third of these in the United States. This book is a personal account of the life of a man who left the priesthood and transitioned into a successful career as an academic. His case illustrates the reasons for leaving that are fairly typical. But above and beyond these it details some deeper systemic problems that he encountered first in the religious realm and then in the secular (...)
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  28. Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress”.Stephen M. Campbell, Connie M. Ulrich & Christine Grady - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):1-3.
  29. A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress.Stephen M. Campbell, Connie Ulrich & Christine Grady - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):2-9.
    On the traditional view, moral distress arises only in cases where an individual believes she knows the morally right thing to do but fails to perform that action due to various constraints. We seek to motivate a broader understanding of moral distress. We begin by presenting six types of distress that fall outside the bounds of the traditional definition and explaining why they should be recognized as forms of moral distress. We then propose and defend a new and more expansive (...)
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  30. Professionalism: A Holistic Approach.Thomas E. Cargill - 1984 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 12 (3):94-94.
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  31. Whose Self-Determination? Barriers to Access to Emergency Hormonal Contraception in Italy.Emanuela Ceva & Sofia Moratti - 2013 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (2):139-167.
    It is a standard requirement of democratic theory that all members of society be treated with equal respect as capable of self-determination (Christiano 2004; Dworkin 1977; Gutmann and Thompson 2004; Patten 2011; Waldron 1999). The fulfillment of this requirement is problematic vis-à-vis conscientious dissenters. Conscientious dissenters refuse to comply with legally enforced duties when compliance risks jeopardizing their moral integrity, because the required behavior would compromise their loyalty to (some of) their moral commitments. Coercing conscientious dissenters into behavior they deem (...)
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  32. Response to Ruud ter Meulen.Ruth Chadwick - 2015 - Diametros 43:21-27.
    In addition to thinking about the meanings of solidarity, it is important to address how solidarity of the appropriate sort can be cultivated. Possibilities include the transformative power of key individuals or events; and the role of institutions. In health care it is suggested that a combination of the two strategies is required. Professional conduct includes not only acting in 'face to face' delivery, but also engaging with those institutions which enable or disable certain ways of acting, so that they (...)
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  33. Lekarskie prawo do sprzeciwu sumienia a odpowiedzialność prawna.Małgorzata Chudzińska, Anna Grzanka-Tykwińska & Bogusław Sygit - 2014 - Studia Prawnicze KUL 4 (60):21-41.
    Lekarski obowiązek niesienia pomocy pacjentom wynika nie tylko z zapisów Kodeksu Etyki Lekarskiej, lecz przede wszystkim z przepisu art. 30 ustawy o zawodach lekarza i lekarza dentysty (u.z.l.), nakazującego lekarzowi udzielenie pomocy „w każdym przypadku, gdy zwłoka w jej udzieleniu mogłaby spowodować niebezpieczeństwo utraty życia, ciężkiego uszkodzenia ciała lub ciężkiego rozstroju zdrowia, oraz w innych przypadkach niecierpiących zwłoki”. Zastosowania przepisu art. 30 u.z.l. nie wyłącza również klauzula sumienia, zawarta w przepisie art. 39 u.z.l. stanowiącym, iż lekarz może co prawda odmówić (...)
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  34. Review of John Kleinig, The Ethics of Policing. [REVIEW]Michael Clark - 2000 - Mind 109.
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  35. Criminals or Patients? Towards a Tragic Conception of Moral and Legal Responsibility.Mark Coeckelbergh - 2010 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (2):233-244.
    There is a gap between, on the one hand, the tragic character of human action and, on the other hand, our moral and legal conceptions of responsibility that focus on individual agency and absolute guilt. Drawing on Kierkegaard’s understanding of tragic action and engaging with contemporary discourse on moral luck, poetic justice, and relational responsibility, this paper argues for a reform of our legal practices based on a less ‘harsh’ (Kierkegaard) conception of moral and legal responsibility and directed more at (...)
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  36. Compromised Humanitarianism.Garrett Cullity - 2010 - In Keith Horton Chris Roche (ed.), Ethical Questions and International NGOs: An Exchange between Philosophers and NGOs. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 157-73.
    The circumstances that create the need for humanitarian action are rarely morally neutral. The extremes of deprivation and want that demand a humanitarian response are often themselves directly caused by acts of war, persecution or misgovernment. And even when the direct causes lie elsewhere—when suffering and loss are caused by natural disaster, endemic disease or poverty of natural resources—the explanations of why some people are afflicted, and not others, are not morally neutral. It is those without economic or political power (...)
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  37. A Starting Point for a Practical and Methodological Discussion. [REVIEW]Giovanni De Grandis - 2013 - (Ibidem) le Letture di Planum. The Journal of Urbanism (1):34-47.
    The paper is a critical discussion of Susan Fainstein's "The Just City". The review points out some weaknesses of Fainstein's three-dimensional account of justice, because the dimension of equity dominates over those of democracy and diversity. Moreover, the reasons for focusing on the just city instead of the good city are questioned. The review discusses two further important issues emerging from Fainstein's book: 1) the ethos of planners and, more generally, the role of experts in policy making; 2) the use (...)
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  38. Considering Whether the Dismissal of Vaccine-Refusing Families Is Fair to Other Clinicians.Michael J. Deem, Mark Christopher Navin & John D. Lantos - 2018 - JAMA Pediatrics 172 (6):515-516.
  39. Should Eudaimonia Structure Professional Virtue?Andreas Eriksen - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4):605-618.
    This article develops a eudaimonistic account of professional virtue. Using the case of teaching, the article argues that professional virtue requires that role holders care about the ends of their work. Care is understood in terms of an investment of the self. Virtuous role holders are invested in their practice in a way that makes professional excellence part of their own good. Failure to care about the ends of professional practice reveals a lack of appreciation of the value of professional (...)
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  40. What Is Professional Integrity?Andreas Eriksen - 2015 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 9 (2):3-17.
    What is professional integrity and what makes it so important? Policies are designed to promote it and decisions are justified in its name. This paper identifies two competing conceptions of professional integrity and argues that, on their own, both are deficient. In response, this paper develops a third, interpretive view, in which professional integrity is conceived as the virtue of being good on the word of the practice. Professions ask for the public’s trust and in doing so, generate a set (...)
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  41. Rights And Duties.David Fagelson - 1999 - Law And Inequality 17 (1):171.
  42. A “Professional Issues and Ethics in Mathematics” Course.James Franklin - 2005 - Australian Mathematical Society Gazette 32:98-100.
    Some courses achieve existence, some have to create Professional Issues and Ethics in existence thrust upon them. It is normally Mathematics; but if you don’t do it, we will a struggle to create a course on the ethical be.” I accepted. or social aspects of science or mathematics. The gift of a greenfield site and a bull- This is the story of one that was forced to dozer is a happy occasion, undoubtedly. But exist by an unusual confluence of outside (...)
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  43. A “Professional Issues” Course: Grounding Philosophy in Workplace Realities.James Franklin - 2005 - In N. Sanitt (ed.), Motivating Science: Science Communication from a Philosophical, Educational and Cultural Perspective. Pantaneto Press.
    Some courses achieve existence, some have existence thrust upon them. It is normally a struggle to create in a scientific academic community a course on the philosophical or social aspects of science, but just occasionally a confluence of outside circumstances causes one to exist, irrespective of the wishes of the scientists. It is an opportunity, and taking advantage of it requires a slightly different approach from what is appropriate to the normal course of events, where a “social” course needs a (...)
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  44. Authorial Vanities II.Joseph S. Fulda - 2012 - Journal of Information Ethics 21 (1):7-8.
  45. The Role of Philosophers in RCR Training.Comstock Gary - 2014 - Journal of Microbiology Biological Education 15 (2):139-142.
    The expanding moral circle lends coherence to the usual hodge-podge of canonical RCR topics. As it is in a person’s own interest to report falsification, understand fabrication, avoid plagiarism, beware of intuition, and justify one’s decisions, it is useful to begin RCR discussions with the principle that we ought to do what is in our own long-term best interests. As it is in the interest of a person’s research group to articulate their reasons for their conclusions, to write cooperatively, review (...)
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  46. Professional Ethics in Slovakia: Outline (Editorial).Vasil Gluchman - 2011 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 1 (1-2):4-6.
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  47. What is Media Ethics ? (Marathi Version).Shriniwas श्रीनिवास Hemade हेमाडे - October 2014 - Daily Loksatta, A Indian Express Publication, Mumbai. Tattvabhan- The Philosophical Consciousness:08.
    What is Media Ethics ? Read in Marathi. पत्रकारिता या व्यवसायाचे स्वरूप एका चमत्कारिक विरोधाभासाने भरलेले आहे. तो असा की, पत्रकारिता ही पूर्णपणे खासगी नोकरी असते आणि माध्यमे हे खासगी क्षेत्र असते. पण त्यांचा चिंतन विषय मात्र निखळ सामाजिक असतो.
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  48. वाङ्‌मयचौर्य आणि‌श्रेयचौर्य :‌‌ एक‌सिंहावलोकन‌‌.Shriniwas Hemade - 2016 - The Explorer Islamabad: Journal of Social Sciences (Issue 1):6-28.
    The paper deals with concept of theft in general with a few selected verses in Sanskrit Literature, from its etymological meaning and the idea behind. It deals with the concept of plagiarism in particular with special reference to some thoughts on plagiarism and credential stealing in ancient Indian scriptures and Vaarakari Sampraday in Maharashtra. The research article is devided in thre parts: first deals with the etymology – in englsih and Sanskrit; second deasl with the considerable scope of the concept (...)
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  49. Theory of Professional Standards and Ethical Policing.Jonathan Hughes - 2012 - In Allyson Macvean, Peter Spindler & Charlotte Solf (eds.), Handbook of Policing, Ethics and Professional Standards. Routledge.
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  50. Common Codes: Divergent Practices.Jennifer Jackson - 1994 - In Ruth Chadwick (ed.), Ethics and the Professions. Ashgate: Avebury.
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