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  1. Working Towards a New Psychiatry - Neuroscience, Technology and the DSM-5.Sabina Alam, Jigisha Patel & James Giordano - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):1-.
    This Editorial introduces the thematic series on 'Toward a New Psychiatry: Philosophical and Ethical Issues in Classification, Diagnosis and Care' http://www.biomedcentral.com/series/newpsychiatry.
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  2. The Medical Model in Psychopathology.S. Alexander Weinstock - 1965 - Diogenes 13 (52):14-25.
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  3. THE EPISTEMOLOGICAL BASIS OF PSYCHIATRIC CONTROVERSIES.Massimiliano Aragona - 2011 - Psychiatria Danubina 23 (3):223-225.
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  4. About and Beyond Comorbidity: Does the Crisis of the DSM Bring on a Radical Rethinking of Descriptive Psychopathology?Massimiliano Aragona - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (1):29-33.
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  5. The Concept of Mental Disorder and the DSM-V.Massimiliano Aragona - 2009 - Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 2 (1):1-14.
    In view of the publication of the DSM-V researchers were asked to discuss the theoretical implications of the definition of mental disorders. The reasons for the use, in the DSM-III, of the term disorder instead of disease are considered. The analysis of these reasons clarifies the distinction between the general definition of disorder and its implicit, technical meaning which arises from concrete use in DSM disorders. The characteristics and limits of this technical meaning are discussed and contrasted to alternative definitions, (...)
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  6. The Role of Comorbidity in the Crisis of the Current Psychiatric Classification System.Massimiliano Aragona - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (1):1-11.
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  7. Commentary on "Lumps and Bumps&Quot.Katherine Arens - 1996 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (1):15-16.
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  8. How It is Not "Just Like Diabetes": Mental Disorders and the Moral Psychologist.Nomy Arpaly - 2005 - Philosophical Issues 15 (1):282–298.
    Many psychiatrists tell their clients that any mental disorder is ‘‘a disease, just like diabetes’’. This slogan appears to suggest that mental states and behavior that are classified ‘‘mental disorders’’ are somehow radically different from other mental states and behaviors—both when it comes to simply understanding people and when it comes to moral assessments of mental states and of actions. After all, mental illness is just like diabetes, while other human conditions are not. That sounds like a huge difference. I (...)
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  9. Working Memory, Thought, and Action.Alan Baddeley - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    'Working Memory, Thought, and Action' is the magnum opus of one of the most influential cognitive psychologists of the past 50 years. This new volume on the model he created discusses the developments that have occurred within the model in the past twenty years, and places it within a broader context.
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  10. Sociology and Concepts of Mental Illness.Gillian Bendelow - 2004 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (2):145-146.
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  11. The History of Mental Symptoms: Descriptive Psychopathology Since the Nineteenth Century.G. E. Berrios - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    Since psychiatry remains a descriptive discipline, it is essential for its practitioners to understand how the language of psychiatry came to be formed. This important book, written by a psychiatrist-historian, traces the genesis of the descriptive categories of psychopathology and examines their interaction with the psychological and philosophical context within which they arose. The author explores particularly the language and ideas that have characterised descriptive psychopathology from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. He presents a masterful survey of the (...)
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  12. Phenomenology and Psychopathology.Wolfgang Blankenburg - 1980 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 11 (2):50-78.
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  13. First Steps Toward a Psychopathology of "Common Sense&Quot.Wolfgang Blankenburg & Aaron L. Mishara - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (4):303-315.
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  14. Doomed by Nature: The Inevitable Failure of Our Naturally Selected Functions.Andreas Blocdek - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (4):343-348.
  15. Freud as an 'Evolutionary Psychiatrist' and the Foundations of a Freudian Philosophy.Andreas Blocdek - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (4):315-324.
  16. Review: Rachel Cooper: Psychiatry and Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW]L. Bortolotti - 2009 - Mind 118 (469):163-166.
  17. Psychiatric Classification and Diagnosis. Delusions and Confabulations.Lisa Bortolotti - 2011 - Paradigmi (1):99-112.
    In psychiatry some disorders of cognition are distinguished from instances of normal cognitive functioning and from other disorders in virtue of their surface features rather than in virtue of the underlying mechanisms responsible for their occurrence. Aetiological considerations often cannot play a significant classificatory and diagnostic role, because there is no sufficient knowledge or consensus about the causal history of many psychiatric disorders. Moreover, it is not always possible to uniquely identify a pathological behaviour as the symptom of a certain (...)
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  18. Conceptual Challenges in the Characterisation and Explanation of Psychiatric Phenomena.Lisa Bortolotti & Luca Malatesti - 2010 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 6 (1):5-10.
    b is collection focuses on conceptual issues that arise within the theoretical dimension of psychiatry. In particular, the invited contributions centre on the nature of psychiatric classification and explanation by addressing important methodological issues. Two strategies are exemplified here. Either the authors directly contribute to foundational issues in psychiatry concerning the nature of psychiatric classification and explanation; or they provide a conceptual analysis that can play a role in developing adequate theories of specific psychiatric disorders.
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  19. Intuitive Expectations and the Detection of Mental Disorder: A Cognitive Background to Folk-Psychiatries.Pascal Boyer - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (1):95-118.
    How do people detect mental dysfunction? What is the influence of cultural models of dysfunction on this detection process? The detection process as such is not usually researched as it falls between the domains of cross-cultural psychiatry and anthropological ethno-psychiatry . I provide a general model for this “missing link” between behavior and cultural models, grounded in empirical evidence for intuitive psychology. Normal adult minds entertain specific intuitive expectations about mental function and behavior, and by implication they infer that specific (...)
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  20. From Szasz to Foucault: On the Role of Critical Psychiatry.Pat Bracken & Philip Thomas - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (3):219-228.
    Because psychiatry deals specifically with ‘mental’ suffering, its efforts are always centrally involved with the meaningful world of human reality. As such, it sits at the interface of a number of discourses: genetics and neuroscience, psychology and sociology, anthropology, philosophy, and the humanities. Each of these provides frameworks, concepts, and examples that seek to assist our attempts to understand mental distress and how it might be helped. However, these discourses work with different assumptions, methodologies, values, and priorities. Some are in (...)
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  21. A Pragmatic Consideration of the Relation Between Depression and Melancholia.David H. Brendel - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (1):53-55.
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  22. Taxonomy and Ontology in Psychiatry: A Survey of Recent Literature.Matthew Broome - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (4):303-319.
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  23. What's Wrong with 'Mental' Disorders?Matthew Broome & Lisa Bortolotti - 2010 - Psychological Medicine.
    Commentary on the editorial by D Stein et al.'s "What is a Mental/Psychiatric Disorder? From DSM-IV to DSM-V".
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  24. Foundations for a Realist Ontology of Mental Disease.Werner Ceusters & Barry Smith - 2010 - Journal of Biomedical Semantics 1 (10):1-23.
    While classifications of mental disorders have existed for over one hundred years, it still remains unspecified what terms such as 'mental disorder', 'disease' and 'illness' might actually denote. While ontologies have been called in aid to address this shortfall since the GALEN project of the early 1990s, most attempts thus far have sought to provide a formal description of the structure of some pre-existing terminology or classification, rather than of the corresponding structures and processes on the side of the patient. (...)
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  25. The Causation of Mental Illness.T. S. Champlin - 1989 - Philosophical Investigations 12 (1):14-32.
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  26. Medical or Moral Kinds? Moving Beyond a False Dichotomy.Louis C. Charland - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (2):119-125.
    I am delighted that Zachar and Potter have chosen to refer to my work on the DSM-IV cluster B personality disorders in their very interesting and ambitious target article. Their suggestion that we turn to virtue ethics rather than traditional moral theory to understand the relation between moral and nonmoral factors in personality disorders is certainly original and worth pursuing. Yet, in the final instance, I am not entirely sure about the exact scope of their proposed analysis. I also worry (...)
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  27. A Madness for Identity: Psychiatric Labels, Consumer Autonomy, and the Perils of the Internet.Louis C. Charland - 2004 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (4):335-349.
  28. Reconceiving Schizophrenia.Man Cheung Chung, Bill Fulford & George Graham (eds.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Schizophrenia has been investigated predominately from psychological, psychiatric and neurobiological perspectives. This book is unique in examining it from a philosophical point of view. It should appeal to every reader who wants to better understand this major mental illness, providing unique insights into the 'experience' of schizophrenia.
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  29. Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.Rachel Cooper - 2014 - Karnac.
    Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Karnac, 2014) evaluates the latest edition of the D.S.M.The publication of D.S.M-5 in 2013 brought many changes. Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders asks whether the D.S.M.-5 classifies the right people in the right way. It is aimed at patients, mental health professionals, and academics with an interest in mental health. Issues addressed include: How is the D.S.M. affected by financial links with the pharmaceutical industry? To what extent (...)
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  30. What is Wrong with the DSM?Rachel Cooper - 2004 - History of Psychiatry 15 (1):5-25.
    The DSM is the main classification of mental disorders used by psychiatrists in the United States and, increasingly, around the world. Although widely used, the DSM has come in for fierce criticism, with many commentators believing it to be conceptually flawed in a variety of ways. This paper assesses some of these philosophical worries. The first half of the paper asks whether the project of constructing a classification of mental disorders that ‘cuts nature at the joints’ makes sense. What is (...)
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  31. The Shift to Mechanistic Explanation and Classification.Kelso Cratsley - 2017 - In S. Tekin & J. Poland (eds.), Extraordinary Science and Psychiatry: Responses to the Crisis in Mental Health Research. MIT Press. pp. 163-196.
    Despite widespread recognition that psychiatry would be better served by a classificatory system based on etiology rather than mere description, it goes without saying that much of the necessary work is yet to be done. In this chapter I take up the increasingly important question of how mechanistic explanation fits into the larger effort to build a scientifically sound etiological and nosological framework. I sketch a rough picture of what mechanistic explanation should look like in the context of psychiatric research, (...)
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  32. Raising Awareness of Values in the Recognition of Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia.Clarissa De Rosalmeida Dantas & Claudio E. M. Banzato - 2010 - Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 3 (2):35-41.
    What we call today negative symptoms are thought to descend from the very deficits that the earliest scholars of schizophrenia (such as Kraepelin and Bleuler) considered to be the key, fundamental symptoms of the disorder. In the latter half of the 20th century, delusions and hallucinations received greater prominence, which eventually changed both the concept of schizophrenia and its diagnostic criteria by placing positive symptoms at the forefront. The first decade of the 21st century witnessed a resurgence of interest in (...)
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  33. Externalist Psychiatry.Will Davies - 2016 - Analysis 76 (3):290-296.
    Psychiatry widely assumes an internalist biomedical model of mental illness. I argue that many of psychiatry’s diagnostic categories involve an implicit commitment to constitutive externalism about mental illness. Some of these categories are socially externalist in nature.
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  34. Reassessing Biopsychosocial Psychiatry.Will Davies & Rebecca Roache - 2017 - British Journal of Psychiatry 210 (1):3-5.
    Psychiatry uncomfortably spans biological and psychosocial perspectives on mental illness, an idea central to Engel's biopsychosocial paradigm. This paradigm was extremely ambitious, proposing new foundations for clinical practice as well as a non-reductive metaphysics for mental illness. Perhaps given this scope, the approach has failed to engender a clearly identifiable research programme. And yet the view remains influential. We reassess the relevance of the biopsychosocial paradigm for psychiatry, distinguishing a number of ways in which it could be (re)conceived.
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  35. Phenomenology and Psychiatry.A. J. J. de Koning & F. A. Jenner (eds.) - 1982 - Grune & Stratton.
  36. Obsessionality & Compulsivity: A Phenomenology of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.Damiaan Denys - 2011 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6 (1):3-.
    Progress in psychiatry depends on accurate definitions of disorders. As long as there are no known biologic markers available that are highly specific for a particular psychiatric disorder, clinical practice as well as scientific research is forced to appeal to clinical symptoms. Currently, the nosology of obsessive-compulsive disorder is being reconsidered in view of the publication of DSM-V. Since our diagnostic entities are often simplifications of the complicated clinical profile of patients, definitions of psychiatric disorders are imprecise and always indeterminate. (...)
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  37. Ethical Decisions in the Classification of Mental Conditions as Mental Illness.Craig Edwards - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (1):73-90.
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  38. Lalumera, E. 2016. Saving the DSM-5? Descriptive Conceptions and Theoretical Concepts of Mental Disorders.Lalumera Elisabetta - forthcoming - Medicina E Storia 9.
    At present, psychiatric disorders are characterized descriptively, as the standard within the scientific community for communication and, to a certain extent, for diagnosis, is the DSM, now at its fifth edition. The main reasons for descriptivism are the aim of achieving reliability of diagnosis and improving communication in a situation of theoretical disagreement, and the Ignorance argument, which starts with acknowledgment of the relative failure of the project of finding biomarkers for most mental disorders. Descriptivism has also the advantage of (...)
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  39. Phenomenology and Dimensional Approaches to Psychiatric Research and Classification.Anthony Vincent Fernandez - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology.
    The classification of mental illness—enshrined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)—has historically followed a categorial model of disorder. However, in light of psychiatry’s failure to validate the DSM categories, psychiatrists have developed dimensional models for understanding and classifying disorders, such as the National Institute of Mental Health’s Research Domain Criteria initiative (RDoC). While some philosophers have recently contributed to the literature on dimensional approaches to psychiatric research and classification, no sustained engagement has yet been offered by (...)
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  40. Is There Any Logic in Madness? Linguistic Reflections on an Interpersonal Theory of Mental Illness.Rudi Fischer - 1994 - Wittgenstein-Studien 1 (1).
  41. Clinicians' Folk Taxonomies of Mental Disorders.Elizabeth H. Flanagan & Roger K. Blashfield - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):249-269.
  42. Should Clinicians' Views of Mental Illness Influence the DSM?Elizabeth H. Flanagan & Roger K. Blashfield - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):285-287.
  43. Concepts Of Health And Disease.Antony G. N. Flew - 1981 - Reading: Addison-Wesley.
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  44. A Liberal Account of Addiction.Bennett Foddy & Julian Savulescu - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):1-22.
    Philosophers and psychologists have been attracted to two differing accounts of addictive motivation. In this paper, we investigate these two accounts and challenge their mutual claim that addictions compromise a person’s self-control. First, we identify some incompatibilities between this claim of reduced self-control and the available evidence from various disciplines. A critical assessment of the evidence weakens the empirical argument for reduced autonomy. Second, we identify sources of unwarranted normative bias in the popular theories of addiction that introduce systematic errors (...)
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  45. Oxford Textbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry.K. W. M. Fulford - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Mental health research and care in the twenty first century faces a series of conceptual and ethical challenges arising from unprecedented advances in the neurosciences, combined with radical cultural and organisational change. The Oxford Textbook of Philosophy of Psychiatry is aimed at all those responding to these challenges, from professionals in health and social care, managers, lawyers and policy makers; service users, informal carers and others in the voluntary sector; through to philosophers, neuroscientists and clinical researchers. Organised around a series (...)
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  46. Six Models of Mental Disorder: A Study Combining Linguistic-Analytic and Empirical Methods.K. W. M. Fulford & Anthony Colombo - 2004 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (2):129-144.
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  47. Response to the Commentaries.K. W. M. Fulford & Mike Jackson - 1997 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (1):87-90.
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  48. The Concept of Mental Disorder: A Proposal.Alfredo Gaete - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (4):327-339.
    During the last years, there has been an important discussion on the concept of mental disorder. Several accounts of such a concept have been offered by theorists, although neither of these accounts seems to have successfully answered both the question of what it means for a certain mental condition to be a disorder and the question of what it means for a certain disorder to be mental. In this paper, I propose an account of the concept of mental disorder that, (...)
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  49. Cultural Syndromes: Socially Learned but Real.Marion Godman - 2016 - Filosofia Unisinos 17 (2).
    While some of mental disorders due to emotional distress occur cross-culturally, others seem to be much more bound to particular cultures. In this paper, I propose that many of these “cultural syndromes” are culturally sanctioned responses to overwhelming negative emotions. I show how tools from cultural evolution theory can be employed for understanding how the syndromes are relatively confined to and retained within particular cultures. Finally, I argue that such an account allows for some cultural syndromes to be or become (...)
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  50. Book Review:The Myth of Mental Illness. Thomas S. Szasz. [REVIEW]Francis Golffing - 1963 - Ethics 73 (2):145-.
1 — 50 / 118