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Psychopathology

Edited by Serife Tekin (University of Pittsburgh, Dalhousie University, Daemen College)
About this topic
Summary The term "psychopathology" is used in a variety of contexts in philosophy of psychiatry. Broadly put, it refers to the philosophical and scientific study of mental disorders. It is also used, however, to denote behaviors or symptoms that are indicative of mental illness, such as hallucinations.
Key works Maibom 2008 Graham 1999 Poland et al 1994
Introductions Poland et al 1994
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  1. Mohammed Abouelleil & Rachel Bingham (2014). Can Psychiatry Distinguish Social Deviance From Mental Disorder? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (3):243-255.
  2. D. M. Adams (2003). CQ Reviews (Greg Loeben, Column Editor) Divided Minds and Successive Selves: Ethical Issues in Disorders of Identity and Personality, by Jennifer Radden. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (1):131-133.
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  3. Sussan O. Adeusi, A. M. Gesinde & Olujide A. Adekeye, Pervasiveness of Conduct Disorder in Special Correctional Centres in Lagos, Nigeria.
    Conduct disorder is a maladjusted behaviour characterized by a consistent pattern of harming others or breaking accepted rules. This study examined the prevalence of conduct disorder among purposefully selected 90 adolescents in two correctional centres in Lagos, Nigeria. Descriptive survey design was employed for the study because it guaranteed an accurate account of the sample for the study. Gilliam Conduct Disorder Scale was used, the items in the scale depict the specific diagnostic behaviours that are characteristic of persons with Conduct (...)
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  4. Pieter Adriaens (2015). Are Paraphilias Mental Disorders? The Case of the DSM. In Darian Meacham (ed.), Medicine and Society, New Perspectives in Continental Philosophy. Springer Verlag.
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  5. Joseph Agassi (2000). The Disorder of Things. International Studies in Philosophy 32 (2):136-138.
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  6. Piers Allott (2009). Mental Disorder, Diagnosis, Treatment and Ethics. Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 1 (1):8.
    This short contribution questions the ethics of basing the way we think and act in relation to mental disorder on beliefs and assumptions that are in the view of the author at best, unhelpful and at worst, simply incorrect.
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  7. John M. Anderson (1938). Change and Personality. Journal of Philosophy 35 (19):505-517.
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  8. Antonio Preti & Paola Miotto (2006). Mental Disorders, Evolution, and Inclusive Fitness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):419-420.
    Grouping severe mental disorders into a global category is likely to lead to a “theory of everything” which forcefully explains everything and nothing. Speculation even at the phenotypic level of the single disorder cannot be fruitful, unless specific and testable models are proposed. Inclusive fitness must be incorporated in such models. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  9. Hanna Aronsson (2011). Sexual Imprinting and Fetishism: An Evolutionary Hypothesis. In Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas de Block (eds.), Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Oxford University Press. pp. 65--90.
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  10. J. B. Ashford & J. Littrell (1998). Psychopathology. In Josefina Figueira-McDonough, Ann Nichols-Casebolt & F. Ellen Netting (eds.), The Role of Gender in Practice Knowledge: Claiming Half the Human Experience. Garland. pp. 127--168.
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  11. Abnormal Time Processing In Autism (2001). Time-Parsing and Autism. In Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack (eds.), Time and Memory: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press. pp. 111.
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  12. Anita Avramides (2013). Other Minds, Autism, and Depth in Human Interaction. In K. W. M. Fulford (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. pp. 275.
    This chapter suggests that, when considering the philosophical problem of other minds, we distinguish between "thick" and "thin" versions of it. While traditional approaches take the problem to be a thick one, more recent work can be seen as addressing only a thin variant. Dretske, while acknowledging the thick problem, proposes a perceptual model of our knowledge of other minds which addresses only the thin version. The chapter proposes that, in the place of the thick problem, we consider the quality (...)
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  13. Borwin Bandelow, Christian Schmahl, Peter Falkai & Dirk Wedekind (2010). Borderline Personality Disorder: A Dysregulation of the Endogenous Opioid System? Psychological Review 117 (2):623-636.
  14. Francis M. Barnes (1924). Mental Disorders. Journal of Philosophy 21 (6):165-166.
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  15. Simon Baron-Cohen (2005). "Autism Autos": Literally. In Todd E. Feinberg & Julian Paul Keenan (eds.), The Lost Self: Pathologies of the Brain and Identity. Oxford University Press.
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  16. Annie Bartlett (2009). Medical Models of Mental Disorder. In Annie Bartlett & Gillian McGauley (eds.), Forensic Mental Health: Concepts, Systems, and Practice. Oxford University Press.
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  17. Anthony Bateman & Peter Fonagy (2007). Mentalization-Based Treatment for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Practical Guide. Oxford University Press UK.
    Mentalizing - the ability to understand oneself and others by inferring the mental states that lie behind overt behavior - develops during childhood within the context of a secure attachment relationship. It is crucial to self-regulation and constructive, intimate relationships. Failure to retain mentalizing, particularly in the midst of emotional interactions, is a core problem in borderline personality disorder and results in severe emotional fluctuations, impulsivity, and vulnerability to interpersonal and social interactions. Mentalization-based treatment for borderline personality disorder is a (...)
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  18. Anthony Bateman & Peter Fonagy (2004). Psychotherapy for Borderline Personality Disorder: Mentalization Based Treatment. Oxford University Press UK.
    Borderline Personality disorder is a severe personality dysfunction characterized by behavioural features such as impulsivity, identity disturbance, suicidal behaviour, emptiness, and intense and unstable relationships. Approximately 2% of the population are thought to meet the criteria for BPD. The authors of this volume - Anthony Bateman and Peter Fonagy - have developed a psychoanalytically oriented treatment to BPD known as mentalization treatment. With randomised controlled trials having shown this method to be effective, this book presents the first account of mentalization (...)
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  19. Matthew L. Baum (2013). The Monoamine Oxidase A (MAOA) Genetic Predisposition to Impulsive Violence: Is It Relevant to Criminal Trials? Neuroethics 6 (2):287-306.
    In Italy, a judge reduced the sentence of a defendant by 1 year in response to evidence for a genetic predisposition to violence. The best characterized of these genetic differences, those in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), were cited as especially relevant. Several months previously in the USA, MAOA data contributed to a jury reducing charges from 1st degree murder (a capital offence) to voluntary manslaughter. Is there a rational basis for this type of use of MAOA evidence in criminal (...)
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  20. Monroe C. Beardsley (1968). Order and Disorder in Art. In Paul Grimley Kuntz (ed.), The Concept of Order. Seattle, Published for Grinnell College by the University of Washington Press. pp. 198--99.
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  21. Benjamin L. Berger (2012). Mental Disorder and the Instability of Blame in Criminal Law. In François Tanguay-Renaud & James Stribopoulos (eds.), Rethinking Criminal Law Theory: New Canadian Perspectives in the Philosophy of Domestic, Transnational, and International Criminal Law. Hart Publishing.
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  22. Rudolph Berlinger (1977). Rehabilitation der Krankheit in philosophischer Sicht. Perspektiven der Philosophie 3:3-17.
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  23. Alexandre Billon (2016). Making Sense of the Cotard Syndrome: Insights From the Study of Depersonalisation. Mind and Language 31 (3):356-391.
    Patients suffering from the Cotard syndrome can deny being alive, having guts, thinking or even existing. They can also complain that the world or time have ceased to exist. In this article, I argue that even though the leading neurocognitive accounts have difficulties meeting that task, we should, and we can, make sense of these bizarre delusions. To that effect, I draw on the close connection between the Cotard syndrome and a more common condition known as depersonalisation. Even though they (...)
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  24. D. Bolton & J. Hill (1998). Mind, Meaning and Mental Disorder. Philosophy 73 (285):504-508.
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  25. Richard J. Bonnie (2010). Should a Personality Disorder Qualify as a Mental Disease in Insanity Adjudication? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):760-763.
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  26. Jill Boucher (1996). 14 What Could Possibly Explain Autism? In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. pp. 223.
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  27. Guy A. Boysen (2008). A Reanalysis of Relational Disorders Using Wakefield's Theory of Harmful Dysfunction. Journal of Mind and Behavior 29 (4):331-343.
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  28. Guy A. Boysen (2007). An Evaluation of the DSM Concept of Mental Disorder. Journal of Mind and Behavior 28 (2):157-173.
    The stated purpose of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is to classify mental disorders. However, no tenable operational definition of mental disorder is offered in the manual. This leaves the possibility open that the behaviors labeled as disordered in the DSM are not members of a valid category. Attempts to define mental illness fall into the category of essentialist or relativist based, respectively, on the acceptance or denial of the existence of a defining biological attribute that all (...)
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  29. Minimal Brain (1979). The Hyperkinetic Disorder 121. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology. , Volume 2. pp. 2--121.
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  30. Hillel D. Braude (2013). Affecting the Body and Transforming Desire: The Treatment of Suffering as the End of Medicine. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (4):265-278.
    I will apply dietetic measures for the benefit of the sick according to my ability and judgment. I will keep them from harm and injustice. The Hippocratic Oath formulates the ethical principle of medical beneficence and its negative formulation non-maleficence. It relates medical ethics to the traditional end of medicine, that is, to heal, or to make whole. First and foremost, the duty of the physician is to heal, and if this is not possible at least not to harm. This (...)
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  31. Caroline Brett (2002). Spiritual Experience and Psychopathology: Dichotomy or Interaction? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (4):373-380.
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  32. Maria Brincker & Elizabeth B. Torres (2013). Noise From the Periphery in Autism. Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience 7:34.
    No two individuals with the autism diagnosis are ever the same—yet many practitioners and parents can recognize signs of ASD very rapidly with the naked eye. What, then, is this phenotype of autism that shows itself across such distinct clinical presentations and heterogeneous developments? The “signs” seem notoriously slippery and resistant to the behavioral threshold categories that make up current assessment tools. Part of the problem is that cognitive and behavioral “abilities” typically are theorized as high-level disembodied and modular functions—that (...)
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  33. Matthew R. Broome (2005). Suffering and Eternal Recurrence of the Same: The Neuroscience, Psychopathology, and Philosophy of Time. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (3):187-194.
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  34. Eric Brown, Stoic Psychopathology.
    Apathy is the best-known feature of Stoicism; even Webster's records that a Stoic lives without passions.1 But it remains unclear what Stoic apathy amounts to, because it remains unclear what Stoics understand by passions and why they find passions problematic. In this essay, I start with four unsettled questions about the Stoic definition of passions, and to answer these questions, I explain the passions as central elements of Stoic psychopathology, that is, as defects relative to the Stoic account of the (...)
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  35. Tamara Kayali Browne (2015). Is Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder Really a Disorder? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (2):313-330.
    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder was recently moved to a full category in the DSM-5 . It also appears set for inclusion as a separate disorder in the ICD-11 . This paper argues that PMDD should not be listed in the DSM or the ICD at all, adding to the call to recognise PMDD as a socially constructed disorder. I first present the argument that PMDD pathologises understandable anger/distress and that to do so is potentially dangerous. I then present evidence that PMDD (...)
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  36. Bengt Brülde, The Concept of Mental Disorder.
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  37. Martin Brüne (2006). Evolutionary Psychiatry is Dead – Long Liveth Evolutionary Psychopathology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):408-408.
    Keller & Miller (K&M) propose that many psychiatric disorders are best explained in terms of a genetic watershed model. This view challenges traditional evolutionary accounts of psychiatric disorders, many of which have tried to argue in support of a presumed balanced polymorphism, implying some hidden adaptive advantage of the alleles predisposing people to psychiatric disorders. Does this mean that evolutionary ideas are no longer viable to explain psychiatric disorders? The answer is no. However, K&M's critical evaluation supports the view that (...)
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  38. Christopher J. Bryan & Hal E. Hershfield (2012). You Owe It to Yourself: Boosting Retirement Saving with a Responsibility-Based Appeal. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (3):429-432.
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  39. Lisa J. Burklund & Matthew D. Lieberman (2012). Advances in Functional Neuroimaging of Psychopathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (4):333-337.
    In their paper "Conceptual Challenges in the Neuroimaging of Psychiatric Disorders," Kanaan and McGuire (2011) review a number of methodological and analytical obstacles associated with the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study psychiatric disorders. Although we agree that there are challenges and limitations to this end, it would be a shame for those without a background in neuroimaging to walk away from this article with the impression that such work is too daunting, and thus not worth pursuing. (...)
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  40. Fredric N. Busch & Barbara L. Milrod (2004). Nature and Treatment of Panic Disorder. In Jaak Panksepp (ed.), Textbook of Biological Psychiatry. Wiley-Liss. pp. 345.
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  41. Edward Bruce Bynum (1994). Transcending Psychoneurotic Disturbances New Approaches in Psychospirituality and Personality Development.
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  42. Stefano Canali (2004). On the Concept of the Psychological. Topoi 23 (2):177-86.
    The idea that certain mental phenomena (e.g. emotions, depression, anxiety) can represent risk factors for certain somatic diseases runs through common thinking on the subject and through a large part of biomedical science. This idea still lies at the focus of the research tradition in psychosomatic medicine and in certain interdisciplinary approaches that followed it, such as psychoneuroimmunology. Nevertheless, the inclusion in the scientific literature of specifically mental phenomena in the list of risk factors pertaining to a specific pathological condition (...)
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  43. William Carpenter (2015). Diagnosing Rather Than Labeling Young People with Mental Disorders; a Response to Mittal Et Al. Bioethics 29 (9):683-683.
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  44. Adrian Carter, Polly Ambermoon & Wayne D. Hall (2011). Drug-Induced Impulse Control Disorders: A Prospectus for Neuroethical Analysis. Neuroethics 4 (2):91-102.
    There is growing evidence that dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) used to treat Parkinson’s Disease can cause compulsive behaviours and impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as pathological gambling, compulsive buying and hypersexuality. Like more familiar drug-based forms of addiction, these iatrogenic disorders can cause significant harm and distress for sufferers and their families. In some cases, people treated with DRT have lost their homes and businesses, or have been prosecuted for criminal sexual behaviours. In this article we first examine the evidence (...)
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  45. Manuel Casonova & Juan Trippe (2010). Radical Cytoarchitecture and Patterns of Cortical Connectivity in Autism. In Francesca Happé & Uta Frith (eds.), Autism and Talent. Oup/the Royal Society.
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  46. M. CerMolacce, J. Naudin & J. Parnas (2007). The “Minimal Self” in Psychopathology: Re-Examining the Self-Disorders in the Schizophrenia Spectrum☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (3):703-714.
    The notion of minimal, basic, pre-reflective or core self is currently debated in the philosophy of mind, cognitive sciences and developmental psychology. However, it is not clear which experiential features such a self is believed to possess. Studying the schizophrenic experience may help exploring the following aspects of the minimal self: the notion of perspective and first person perspective, the ‘mineness’ of the phenomenal field, the questions of transparency, embodiment of point of view, and the issues of agency and ownership, (...)
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  47. Louis Charland, Moral Nature of the Dsm-IV Cluster B Personality Disorders.
    Moral considerations do not appear to play a large role in discussions of the DSM-IV personality disorders and debates about their empirical validity. Yet philosophical analysis reveals that the Cluster B personality disorders, in particular, may in fact be moral rather than clinical conditions. This finding has serious consequences for how they should be treated and by whom.
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  48. Louis Charland (2007). Character: Moral Treatment and the Personality Disorders. In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oup Usa.
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  49. Louis C. Charland (2007). Affective Neuroscience and Addiction. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):20 – 21.
    The author comments on the article “The neurobiology of addiction: Implications for voluntary control of behavior,‘ by S. E. Hyman. Hyman suggests that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The author states that brain and neurochemical systems are involved in addiction. He also suggests that neuroscience can link the diseased brain processes in addiction to the moral struggles of the addicts. Accession Number: 24077919; Authors: Charland, Louis C. 1; Email Address: charland@uwo.ca; Affiliations: 1: University of Western (...)
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  50. Louis C. Charland (2004). Personality Disorders. In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford University Press. pp. 64.
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