About this topic
Summary The term "psychopathology" is used in a variety of contexts in philosophy of psychiatry. Broadly put, it refers to the philosophical and scientific study of mental disorders. It is also used, however, to denote behaviors or symptoms that are indicative of mental illness, such as hallucinations.
Key works Maibom 2008 Graham 1999 Poland et al 1994
Introductions Poland et al 1994
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  1. Perception and the Inhuman Gaze: Perspectives From Philosophy, Phenomenology and the Sciences.Fred Cummins, Anya Daly, James Jardine & Dermot Moran - 2020 - New York, NY, USA; London, UK: Routledge.
    The diverse essays in this volume speak to the relevance of phenomenological and psychological questioning regarding perceptions of the human. This designation, human, can be used beyond the mere identification of a species to underwrite exclusion, denigration, dehumanization and demonization, and to set up a pervasive opposition in Othering all deemed inhuman, nonhuman, or posthuman. As alerted to by Merleau-Ponty, one crucial key for a deeper understanding of these issues is consideration of the nature and scope of perception. Perception defines (...)
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  2. Putinism: A Phenomenological and Prototypical Investigation.Andrej Poleev - 2021
    English abstract: On last day of the year 1999, Russia has entered another era of despotism, that of Vladimir Putin. During his reign, the Putin‘s clan has undermined and infiltrated the mass media, the parliament and the judicial system. Deliberate violation of basic citizen‘s rights, compulsory acquisition of property, government-funded racket, misuse of mass media to scarify and to disinform the peoples belong to the diabolic methods of self-constituted disposers. All this lawlessness has led to exorbitant corruption, mass poverty, economic (...)
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  3. ‘Deep Brain Stimulation is No ON/OFF-Switch’: An Ethnography of Clinical Expertise in Psychiatric Practice.Maarten van Westen, Erik Rietveld, Annemarie van Hout & Damiaan Denys - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-20.
    Despite technological innovations, clinical expertise remains the cornerstone of psychiatry. A clinical expert does not only have general textbook knowledge, but is sensitive to what is demanded for the individual patient in a particular situation. A method that can do justice to the subjective and situation-specific nature of clinical expertise is ethnography. Effective deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder involves an interpretive, evaluative process of optimizing stimulation parameters, which makes it an interesting case to study clinical expertise. The aim of (...)
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  4. Multi-Modal Dual-Task Measurement: A New Virtual Reality for Assessment.Tom Burke & Brendan Rooney - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
  5. Boosting Autobiographical Memory and the Sense of Identity of Alzheimer Patients Through Repeated Reminiscence Workshops?Hervé Platel, Marie-Loup Eustache, Renaud Coppalle, Armelle Viard, Francis Eustache, Mathilde Groussard & Béatrice Desgranges - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Despite severe amnesia, some studies showed that Alzheimer Disease patients with moderate to severe dementia keep a consistent, but impoverished representation of themselves, showing preservation of the sense of identity even at severe stages of the illness. Some studies suggest that listening to music can facilitate the reminiscence of autobiographical memories and that stimulating autobiographical memory would be relevant to support the self of these patients. Consequently, we hypothesized that repeated participation to reminiscence workshops, using excerpts of familiar songs as (...)
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  6. Self and Other Mentalizing Polarities and Dimensions of Mental Health: Association With Types of Symptoms, Functioning and Well-Being.Sergi Ballespí, Jaume Vives, Carla Sharp, Lorena Chanes & Neus Barrantes-Vidal - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Research suggests that the ability to understand one’s own and others’ minds, or mentalizing, is a key factor for mental health. Most studies have focused the attention on the association between global measures of mentalizing and specific disorders. In contrast, very few studies have analyzed the association between specific mentalizing polarities and global measures of mental health. This study aimed to evaluate whether self and other polarities of mentalizing are associated with a multidimensional notion of mental health, which considers symptoms, (...)
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  7. Seductions of Crime: Moral and Sensual Attractions in Doing Evil.Jack Katz - 1988 - New York: Basic Books.
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  8. Compassion: From Its Evolution to a Psychotherapy.Paul Gilbert - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    The concept, benefits and recommendations for the cultivation of compassion have been recognized in the contemplative traditions for thousands of years. In the last 30 years or so, the study of compassion has revealed it to have major physiological and psychological effects influencing well-being, addressing mental health difficulties, and promoting prosocial behavior. This paper outlines an evolution informed biopsychosocial, multicomponent model to caring behavior and its derivative “compassion” that underpins newer approaches to psychotherapy. The paper explores the origins of caring (...)
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  9. The Phenomenology of Voice-Hearing and Two Concepts of Voice.Sam Wilkinson & Joel Krueger - forthcoming - In Angela Woods, B. Alderson-Day & C. Fernyhough (eds.), Voices in Psychosis: Interdisciplinary Perspective.
    The experiences described in the VIP transcripts are incredibly varied and yet frequently explicitly labelled by participants as "voices." How can we make sense of this? If we reflect carefully on uses of the word "voice", we see that it can express at least two entirely different concepts, which pick out categorically different phenomena. One concept picks out a speech sound (e.g. "This synthesizer has a "voice" setting"). Another concept picks out a specific agent (e.g. "I hear two voices: one (...)
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  10. Watsuji, Intentionality, and Psychopathology.Joel Krueger - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):757-780.
    Despite increasing interest in the work of Tetsuro Watsuji, his discussion of intentionality remains underexplored. I here develop an interpretation and application of his view. First, I unpack Watsuji’s arguments for the inherently social character of intentionality, consider how they connect with his more general discussion of embodiment and betweenness, and then situate his view alongside phenomenologists like Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. Next, I argue that Watsuji’s characterization of the social character of intentionality is relevant to current discussions in phenomenological (...)
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  11. Oggetto, scopo e metodo in psicoterapia.Donato Santarcangelo & Carlotta Montinaro - 2003 - In Psycomedia (ed.), PSYCHOMEDIA. Milano MI, Italia:
    Con il termine psicoterapia è d'uso riferirsi al trattamento del "disagio" mentale attraverso mezzi psichici, ma l'ovvietà "tautologica" della definizione tende a svanire se si affronta un esame più approfondito dei termini "psiche", "mezzi psichici" e "disagio mentale". Una definizione non può in linea generale che assumere un significato ed un valore limitato nel tempo e nello spazio, ma il sostanziale polimorfismo teorico, metodologico, tecnico e linguistico che contraddistingue la psicoterapia ne rende ancora più ardua una chiara ed univoca definizione. (...)
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  12. Tracking the Objects of the Psychopathology On Interdisciplinarity of Psychopathology on the Margins of Historia Polskiego Szaleństwa.Przemysław Nowakowski - 2020 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 11 (1):1-14.
    This paper is a loose commentary on Marcinów’s book (2017). The commentary is focused on the objects of psychopathological investigations and the role of psychology / psychiatry tension in the process of singling out, tracking, and describing them. As a consequence, there are limitations of collaborative and integrative efforts between psychologists and psychiatrists where questions of psychopathology are concerned.
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  13. Darker Sides of Guilt: The Case of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.Juliette Vazard & Julien Deonna - 2019 - In Bradford Cokelet & Corey Maley (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Guilt.
    Why do thoughts involving harm and damage trigger guilt in certain individuals and not in others? The significance of this question comes into view when considering the medical and psychological literature on patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Patients with OCD feel guilt in response to having certain recurring, negative thoughts whose content evoke scenarios of harm and damage. This, however—at least in most readings of what those thoughts consist of—is puzzling. The transition from having a thought about being the source (...)
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  14. Disturbed Consciousness: New Essays on Psychopathology and Theories of Consciousness.Rocco J. Gennaro (ed.) - 2015 - MIT Press.
    In Disturbed Consciousness, philosophers and other scholars examine various psychopathologies in light of specific philosophical theories of consciousness. The contributing authors—some of them discussing or defending their own theoretical work—consider not only how a theory of consciousness can account for a specific psychopathological condition but also how the characteristics of a psychopathology might challenge such a theory. Thus one essay defends the higher-order thought (HOT) theory of consciousness against the charge that it cannot account for somatoparaphrenia (a delusion in which (...)
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  15. Neurosciences, Syntax and Language: The Subject’s Challenge.Mario Eduardo Costa Pereira - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):103-105.
    Does the concept of “subject” still have any logical-scientific consistency that could give it some relevance in the contemporary demands of rationality? Or is it rather a kind of fossil of metaphysical speculation that should be completely ruled out? Judging from the course of the history of philosophy, which for nearly 400 years has been devoted to the criticism of the subject’s conception directly deriving from the Cartesian cogito, it is amazing the stimulant power of this phantom that has so (...)
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  16. Psychopathology: Its Causes and Symptoms . By F. Kräupl Taylor. Price £5.50.Eliot Slater - 1980 - Journal of Biosocial Science 12 (2):239-241.
    Cambridge Journals Online (CJO) is the online journals publishing service of Cambridge University Press. CJO hosts leading journals across multiple disciplines.
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  17. Book Review: Mental Disorder, Work Disability, and the Law. [REVIEW]Michael L. Perlin - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (4):310-313.
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  18. Through the Community Looking Glass: Reevaluating the Ethical and Policy Implications of Research on Adolescent Risk and Psychopathology.Scyatta A. Wallace & Celia B. Fisher - 2000 - Ethics and Behavior 10 (2):99-118.
    Drawing on a conception of scientists and community members as partners in the construction of ethically responsible research practices, this article urges investigators to seek the perspectives of teenagers and parents in evaluating the personal and political costs and benefits of research on adolescent risk behaviors. Content analysis of focus group discussions involving over 100 parents and teenagers from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds revealed community opinions regarding the scientific merit, social value, racial bias, and participant and group harms and (...)
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  19. On the Subject Matter of Phenomenological Psychopathology.Anthony Vincent Fernandez & Allan Køster - 2019 - In Giovanni Stanghellini, Matthew Broome, Anthony Vincent Fernandez, Paolo Fusar-Poli, Andrea Raballo & René Rosfort (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Phenomenological Psychopathology. Oxford: pp. 191–204.
    “On the Subject Matter of Phenomenological Psychopathology” provides a framework for the phenomenological study of mental disorders. The framework relies on a distinction between (ontological) existentials and (ontic) modes. Existentials are the categorial structures of human existence, such as intentionality, temporality, selfhood, and affective situatedness. Modes are the particular, concrete phenomena that belong to these categorial structures, with each existential having its own set of modes. In the first section, we articulate this distinction by drawing primarily on the work of (...)
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  20. Mirror Synesthesia and the Limits of Misidentification.Michael Young - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (3):169-172.
    In Possibilities of Misidentification, Ashwell contends that the immunity principle developed and defended in my Pathologies of Thought and First Person Authority "doesn't show us anything about introspection or the first person—which should make us wonder whether it really captures that's at stake in discussions of IEM". Ashwell's argument hinges on two claims: IP turns on features that are not unique to introspection, to the first person, or to "subject matter that is thought to have IEM", and IP does not (...)
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  21. The Varieties of Inner Speech Questionnaire – Revised : Replicating and Refining Links Between Inner Speech and Psychopathology.Ben Alderson-Day, Kaja Mitrenga, Sam Wilkinson, Simon McCarthy-Jones & Charles Fernyhough - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 65:48-58.
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  22. A Second-Person Model to Anomalous Social Cognition.Inês Hipólito & Jorge Martins - 2018 - In J. Gonçalves, J. G. Pereira & Inês Hipólito (eds.), Studies in Brain and Mind. Springer Verlag. pp. 55-69.
    Reports of patients with schizophrenia show a fragmented and anomalous subjective experience. This pathological subjective experience, we suggest, can be related to the fact that disembodiment inhibits the possibility of intersubjective experience, and more importantly of common sense. In this paper, we ask how to investigate the anomalous experience both from qualitative and quantitative viewpoints. To our knowledge, few studies have focused on a clinical combination of both first- phenomenological assessment and third-person biological methods, especially for Schizophrenia, or ASD therapeutics (...)
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  23. Schizophrenia, Social Practices and Cultural Values: A Conceptual Introduction.Inês Hipólito, J. Pereira & J. Gonçalves - 2018 - In Inês Hipólito, Jorge Gonçalves & João G. Pereira (eds.), Studies in Brain and Mind. Springer Verlag. pp. 1-15.
    Schizophrenia is usually described as a fragmentation of subjective experience and the impossibility to engage in meaningful cultural and intersubjective practices. Although the term schizophrenia is less than 100 years old, madness is generally believed to have accompanied mankind through its historical and cultural ontogeny. What does it mean to be “mad”? The failure to adopt social practices or to internalize cultural values of common sense? Despite the vast amount of literature and research, it seems that the study of schizophrenia (...)
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  24. Law and the Life Sciences: O'Connor V. Donaldson: Insanity Inside Out.George J. Annas - 1976 - Hastings Center Report 6 (4):11.
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  25. Can Any One Theory of Emotion Really Do?Douglas W. Heinrichs - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (1):17-19.
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  26. Depersonalization and the Sense of Realness.Somogy Varga - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (2):103-113.
    From Minkowski and Jaspers to Blankenburg, phenomenological psychopathology has assumed that lost or diminished experience of ‘realness’ is related to an impairment of tacit level intersubjectivity. This paper develops a theoretical framework for this hypothesis by drawing mainly on the phenomenological tradition and the works of Wittgenstein. The argument, in return, contributes to recent discussions regarding depersonalization and intersubjectivity. In addition, the approach suggests some interesting implications for psychopathology.
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  27. The Self and its Defences.M. Di Francesco, M. Marraffa & A. Paternoster - 2016 - London: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In this book we offer a theory of the self, whose core ideas are that the self is a process of self-representing, and this process aims mainly at defending the self-conscious subject against the threat of its metaphysical inconsistence. In other words, the self is essentially a repertoire of psychological manoeuvres whose outcome is a self-representation aimed at coping with the fundamental fragility of the human subject. Our picture of the self differs from both the idealist and the eliminative approaches (...)
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  28. What Is It Like to Be an Alien?Matt Matravers - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (5):743-749.
    This brief article is concerned with an aspect of Jonathan Glover's book, Alien Landscapes?. After reflecting a little on the book as a whole, the question that is taken up is, ‘Why might a book that seeks to help those without mental disorders understand what they are like “from the inside” be of interest to laymen and practitioners in the criminal law?’. One answer lies in part in the way that ‘what it is like from the inside’ might interact with (...)
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  29. Structural Model.Kelso Cratsley - 2017 - In V. Zeigler-Hill & T. Shackelford (eds.), Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences. Springer. pp. 1-5.
    The mind is not unitary. Despite enduring Cartesian influences, the idea that mental activity is the work of an assortment of processes remains one of the more plausible guiding assumptions of psychological research. Freud endorsed a distinctive variant of this broader explanatory commitment. Beginning with his earlier metapsychological works, he slowly developed a view of the mind as a collection of closely related systems. Famously, these ultimately became known as the id, ego, and super-ego. Like much of Freud’ s work, (...)
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  30. Disorientation and the Medicalization of Struggle.Ami Harbin - 2014 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (1):99.
    As a text in use by mental health practitioners, policy makers, and ordinary individuals, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) categorizes a variety of mental, psychological, and emotional experiences on a wide spectrum of disorders. Many common experiences are described there as symptoms, chiefly for the purposes of identifying, diagnosing, and treating disorders. “Disorientations” are not (yet) categorized as a stand-alone disorder in the DSM, but involve a cluster of experiences that border on and overlap with experiences (...)
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  31. Forensic Psychiatry Symposium: Anomalies of Section 2 of the Homicide Act 1957.A. Kenny - 1986 - Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (1):24.
    Section 2 of the 1957 Homicide Act is indefensible: the concept of 'mental responsibility' is a hybrid which turns the psychiatrist witness either into a thirteenth juryman or a spare barrister. But reform does not lie along the lines suggested by the Butler Committee or the Criminal Law Revision Committee. The latter leaves the jury with insufficient guidance; the former returns to the bad eighteenth century policy of treating mental illness not as a factor in determining responsibility but as a (...)
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  32. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Neuroscience. Three Approaches to the Mind: A Synthetic Analysis of the Varieties of Human Experience.Kenneth R. Westphal - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):722-725.
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  33. Review of The Death of Desire. A Study in Psychopathology. [REVIEW]William Richardson - 1989 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 9 (2):54-58.
    Reviews the book, The death of desire. A study in psychopathology by M. Guy Thompson. Thompson has written an amiable book, filled with the spirit of ecumenism. A practising clinical psychologist, his thesis is that desire is the "foundation of the human subject," that it is "located in the heart of the unconscious," that, if once "situated in phenomenology," this unconscious can reveal "the nature of intersubjective relations." Accordingly, pathological phenomena would be attributable to the deadening of this desire—hence, the (...)
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  34. Review of Hermeneutics and Psychological Theory: Interpretive Perspectives on Personality, Psychotherapy, and Psychopathology. [REVIEW]Rolf von Eckartsberg - 1991 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):131-133.
    Reviews the book, Hermeneutics and psychological theory: Interpretive perspectives on personality, psychotherapy, and psychopathology edited by S. B. Messer, L. A. Sass, and R. L. Woolfolk. This book is the result of the Second Symposium on Applied Psychology sponsored by the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology of Rutgers University, focussing on the epistemological foundations of psychology. The book operates on several levels simultaneously: theory and research, overview presentations and concrete investigations, clinical and experimental research. It covers a wide (...)
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  35. Hermeneutics and Psychopathology: Jaspers and Hillman.Robert S. Corrington - 1987 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 7 (2):70-80.
    The correlation between psychopathology and hermeneutics has long been at the forefront of philosophic discussion. In recent years a number of thinkers, particularly in France, have advanced the claim that all hermeneutic acts are themselves part of an intrinsic pathology which makes it impossible to arrive at neutral and binding interpretations. The so-called hermeneutics of suspicion has served to undermine those interpretive norms which guided the depth psychology coming out of Freud and Jung. This hermeneutic and semiotic anarchy derives its (...)
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  36. Vaschide, Viollet, Maris, Lubomirska, Meunier, Laures: Contributions to Psychopathology.Frederic Lyman Wells - 1909 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (10):266.
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  37. Case Studies in the Psychopathology of Crime. Vol. III: Cases 10-13.Cornelius L. Golightly - 1949 - Ethics 60 (1):72-73.
  38. Galen on Psychology, Psychopathology and Function and Diseases of the Nervous System. [REVIEW]E. D. Phillips - 1976 - The Classical Review 26 (2):299-300.
  39. The Experience of God: Portraits in the Phenomenological Psychopathology of Schizophrenia. [REVIEW]David L. Smith - 1990 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 21 (2):180-184.
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  40. The Death of Desire. A Study in Psychopathology. [REVIEW]W. Ver Eecke - 1992 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 23 (1):103-106.
  41. Are Culture-Bound Syndromes as Real as Universally-Occurring Disorders?Rachel Cooper - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (4):325-332.
    This paper asks what it means to say that a disorder is a “real” disorder and then considers whether culture-bound syndromes are real disorders. Following J.L. Austin I note that when we ask whether some supposed culture-bound syndrome is a real disorder we should start by specifying what possible alternatives we have in mind. We might be asking whether the reported behaviours genuinely occur, that is, whether the culture-bound syndrome is a genuine phenomenon as opposed to a myth. We might (...)
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  42. Establishing Diganostic Criteria: The Role of Clinical Pragmatics.Louise Cummings - 2012 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 8 (1):61-84.
    The study of pragmatic disorders is of interest to speech-language pathologists who have a professional responsibility to assess and treat communication impairments. However, these disorders, it will be argued in this paper, have a significance beyond the clinical management of clients with communication impairments. Specifically, pragmatic disorders can now make a contribution to the diagnosis of a range of clinical conditions in which communication is adversely affected. These conditions include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, the autistic spectrum disorders, schizophrenia and the (...)
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  43. Hogen Monogatari, Tale of the Disorder in Hogen.Helen McCullough & William R. Wilson - 1973 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 93 (2):223.
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  44. Diagnosing Mental Disorders and Saving the Normal: American Psychiatric Association, 2013. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Ed. American Psychiatric Publishing: Washington, DC. 991 Pp., ISBN: 978-0890425558. Price: $122.70.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (2):241-244.
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  45. The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Mental Disorder.Philip Gerrans & Jakob Hohwy (eds.) - 2011 - Routledge.
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  46. Agency and Mental States in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.Judit Szalai - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (1):47-59.
    The dominant philosophical conceptions of obsessive-compulsive behavior present its subject as having a deficiency, usually characterized as volitional, due to which she lacks control and choice in acting. Compulsions (mental or physical) tend to be treated in isolation from the obsessive thoughts that give rise to them. I offer a different picture of compulsive action, one that is, I believe, more faithful to clinical reality. The clue to (most) obsessive-compulsive behavior seems to be the way obsessive thoughts, which are grounded (...)
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  47. When Is Deep Brain Stimulation a Medical Benefit, and What Is Required for Consent?Sven Nyholm & Stephen M. Campbell - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 7 (3):150-152.
    Hübner and White argue that we should not administer DBS to psychopathic prisoners. While we are sympathetic to their conclusion, we argue that the authors’ two central arguments for this conclusion are problematic. Their first argument appeals to an overly restrictive conception of individual medical benefit: namely, that an individual medical benefit must alleviate subjective suffering. We highlight cases that clearly constitute individual medical benefits although there is no relief of subjective suffering. The second argument depends on an overly restrictive (...)
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  48. Doubt in the Insula: Risk Processing in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.Judy Luigjes, Martijn Figee, Philippe N. Tobler, Wim van den Brink, Bart de Kwaasteniet, Guido van Wingen & Damiaan Denys - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  49. Computer Enabled Neuroplasticity Treatment: A Clinical Trial of a Novel Design for Neurofeedback Therapy in Adult ADHD.Benjamin Cowley, Édua Holmström, Kristiina Juurmaa, Levas Kovarskis & Christina M. Krause - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  50. Prestimulus Low Frequency EEG Affects Processing Outcomes in the Equiprobable Go/NoGo Task in Healthy Ageing.De Blasio Frances & Barry Robert - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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