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  1. Neuroethics, Neo-Lockeanism, and Embodied Subjectivity.Grant Gillett - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (1):43-46.
  2. Intentionality.Joel Krueger - forthcoming - In G. Stanghellini, M. Broome, A. Fernandez, P. Fusar Poli, Raballo A. & R. Rosfort (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Phenomenological Psychopathology. Oxford University Press.
  3. Watsuji's Phenomenology of Aidagara: An Interpretation and Application to Psychopathology.Joel Krueger - forthcoming - In S. Taguchi & Andrea Altobrando (eds.), Tetsugaku Companion to Phenomenology and Japanese Philosophy. Springer. pp. 165-181.
    I discuss Watsuji’s characterization of aidagara or “betweenness”. First, I develop a phenomenological reading of aidagara. I argue that the notion can help illuminate aspects of our embodied subjectivity and its interrelation with the world and others. Along the way, I also indicate how the notion can be fruitfully supplemented by different sources of empirical research. Second, I put aidagara to work in the context of psychopathology. I show how disruptions of aidagara in schizophrenia not only affirm the foundational role (...)
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  4. Commentary on "Suicide, Euthanasia, and the Psychiatrist".Kelleher Michael J. - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (2):145-149.
  5. Félida, Doubled Personality, and the ‘Normal State’ in Late 19th-Century French Psychology.Kim M. Hajek - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (2):66-89.
    The case of Félida X and her ‘doubled personality’ served in the last quarter of the 19th century as a proving ground for a distinctively French form of psychology that bore the stamp of physiology, including the comparative term normal state. Debates around Félida’s case provided the occasion for reflection about how that term and its opposites could take their places in the emerging discursive field of psychopathology. This article centres its analysis on Eugène Azam’s 1876–77 study of Félida, and (...)
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  6. Why Schizophrenia Is so Relevant to Enaction and to Clinical Ethics: Naturalizing the Transcendental and the Risk of Stigmatizing.Daria Dibitonto - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (1):107-109.
    The mutual interest between embodied cognitive sciences, in particular enactivism, and phenomenological psychopathology has significantly increased in the last 15 years. Gipps's article contributes to this field of research by defining ego boundaries in an enactivist framework to explain how the distinction self-other emerges and is maintained in ordinary healthy conditions, and how it is weakened and impaired in cases of schizophrenia. Gipps's first tenet is: The ego-boundary is enacted equiprimordially with experience, that is, it...
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  7. De Haan on Sense-Making and Psychopathology.Caitrin Donovan & Dominic Murphy - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (1):29-30.
    De Haan has provided a novel and distinctly enactivist solution to the problem of integrating the physiological, experiential, social and existential. We admire her articulation of her fourth "existential" dimension. Not only does it represent a real attempt to bridge, as she says, enactivism's explanatory gap, it is also a potentially useful construct for conceptualizing the way that self-reflexivity seems to go astray in much psychopathology. We think that pinpointing this phenomenon is something that phenomenological accounts excel at. We have, (...)
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  8. On Excentricity and Explanation: Reply To Sass's and Walter's Comments.Thomas Fuchs - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (1):89-90.
    In his commentary, Louis Sass points out some aspects of excentricity that are important to keep in mind when applying the notion to schizophrenia.First, it is true that the failure of the excentric position may not be equated with the naïve egocentricity of Piaget's young child—it is not a "regression" to an earlier developmental stage. On the contrary, paranoid delusion is only possible because the patients had already acquired the excentric position before, for this is what leads them to see (...)
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  9. Disturbance of Ego-Boundary Enaction in Schizophrenia.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (1):91-106.
    Today the concept of 'schizophrenia' is often presented in psychiatric texts as a construct, a construct bringing together a diverse and, allegedly, independently assailable range of signs and symptoms. According to such a diagnostic scheme two patients may both be allowed to count as suffering from schizophrenia despite sharing hardly a single symptom. The validity of the concept has accordingly been contested by psychologists for its apparent lack of unity. In the absence of clear independent evidence of a unitary physiological (...)
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  10. Delusion, Reality, and Excentricity: Comment on Thomas Fuchs.Louis A. Sass - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (1):81-83.
    In "Delusion, Reality, and Intersubjectivity," Thomas Fuchs offers a superb presentation of an enactive/phenomenological approach to schizophrenic delusions—an approach that is clearly superior to the poor-reality-testing formula that has dominated thinking about delusion in psychiatry, psychoanalysis, and cognitive-behavioral theory. As he convincingly argues, two key tendencies go a long way toward accounting for the distinctive features of delusion in schizophrenia: 1) withdrawal from practical, sensori-motoric interaction with the physical environment; and 2) failure to experience reality in intersubjective terms—as a realm (...)
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  11. The Subject of Psychopathology: Of What Plural Is It Made?Jurandir Freire Costa, Benilton Bezerra & Jairo de Almeida Gama - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):89-97.
  12. Some Remarks for an Agenda Regarding Phenomenologically Oriented Pharmacological Treatment of Schizophrenia.Paulo Dalgalarrondo - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):147-150.
    The project of therapeutic approaches sensible to the very subjective experience of patients suffering from schizophrenia, especially those treatments most used in current practice, as pharmacological, is and must always be and unambiguously welcomed.Phenomenology is a rich and fertile tradition, born in modern academic philosophy, that along the development of psychopathology in the twentieth century inspired sophisticated theories and new conceptual tools for clinical descriptions and understanding of mental patients and disorders such as schizophrenia...
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  13. What Is the Subject in Question?João José R. L. De Almeida - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):99-101.
    Arguing for the theoretical importance of the concept of “subject” or “self” on behalf of the “psychiatric/psycho-pathological thinking” is justified in so far as, as Costa, Bezerra Jr., and Gama say, “this is still an indispensable concept for understanding the conditions for the gestation and functioning of psychological life.” In what sense are these concepts “indispensable?”All the hints suggest them as necessary complements for neurobiological investigations to become useful for clinical employment. So, if we consider that it is possible to (...)
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  14. Diagnostic Reasoning in Psychiatry: Acknowledging an Explicit Role for Intersubjective Knowing.Mona Gupta, Nancy Potter & Simon Goyer - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (1):49-64.
    In most areas of medicine, the physician's primary task is to diagnose the patient's presenting problem by correctly identifying the underlying pathology causing that problem. Diagnoses are established through a process of correlating the information obtained from an interview with the patient about his history of illness and circumstances, with additional evidence of the underlying disease derived from physical examination findings and/or the results of laboratory investigations and diagnostic imaging. In contemporary health care, various movements that call for a shift (...)
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  15. The Network Approach to Psychopathology: A Review of the Literature 2008–2018 and an Agenda for Future Research.Donald J. Robinaugh, Ria H. A. Hoekstra, Emma R. Toner & Denny Borsboom - 2019 - Psychological Medicine:1-14.
    The network approach to psychopathology posits that mental disorders can be conceptualized and studied as causal systems of mutually reinforcing symptoms. This approach, first posited in 2008, has grown substantially over the past decade and is now a full-fledged area of psychiatric research. In this article, we provide an overview and critical analysis of 363 articles produced in the first decade of this research program, with a focus on key theoretical, methodological, and empirical contributions. In addition, we turn our attention (...)
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  16. A supressão transitória dos piores demônios da nossa natureza — uma revisão de Steven Pinker ' os melhores anjos da nossa natureza: por que a violência declinou ' (‘The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined’) (2012)(revisão revisada 2019).Michael Richard Starks - 2019 - In Delírios Utópicos Suicidas no Século XXI Filosofia, Natureza Humana e o Colapso da Civilization- Artigos e Comentários 2006-2019 5ª edição. Las Vegas, NV USA: Reality Press. pp. 242-246.
    Este não é um livro perfeito, mas é único, e se você desnatado o primeiro 400 ou assim páginas, o último 300 (de alguns 700) são uma tentativa muito boa para aplicar o que é conhecido sobre o comportamento de mudanças sociais na violência e maneiras ao longo do tempo. O tema básico é: como o nosso controle genético e limitar a mudança social? Surpreendentemente, ele não descreve a natureza da seleção de parentes (aptidão inclusiva), o que explica grande parte (...)
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  17. Pharmacological Treatment of Schizophrenia in Light of Phenomenology.Melissa Garcia Tamelini & Guilherme Peres Messas - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):133-142.
    The construction of the phenomenological project of psychopathology began in the 1920s. Husserl’s philosophical elaborations, which started to be drawn a few decades earlier, had a broad repercussion on the historical and cultural context of the time and was eventually incorporated into several disciplines, including psychopathology. Particularly in this field, phenomenology had a significant impact, because its epistemological foundations was a close match to the rigorous purposes of a scientific investigation of mental disorders.The phenomenological contribution has established an irrevocable and (...)
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  18. Don’T Blame the Model: Reconsidering the Network Approach to Psychopathology.Laura F. Bringmann & Markus I. Eronen - 2018 - Psychological Review 125 (4):606-615.
    The network approach to psychopathology is becoming increasingly popular. The motivation for this approach is to provide a replacement for the problematic common cause perspective and the associated latent variable model, where symptoms are taken to be mere effects of a common cause (the disorder itself). The idea is that the latent variable model is plausible for medical diseases, but unrealistic for mental disorders, which should rather be conceptualized as networks of directly interacting symptoms. We argue that this rationale for (...)
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  19. Technical Delusions in Schizophrenia: A Philosophical Interpretation.Stefan Kristensen - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (3):173-181.
    Technical Delusions in Schizophrenia: productivity and Limits of an AnalogyIn the debates on psychosis, the cases of "technical delusions" or "influencing machines" are regularly coming back, both in phenomenological and psychoanalytical psychiatry. As Alfred Kraus points out in the 1990s, "Even if such delusions do not represent the most frequent content in schizophrenia, they receive relatively high consideration for the diagnosis of schizophrenia". And more recently, he notes that, "It is not by chance that people with schizophrenia so often use (...)
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  20. Explaining Biological Depression Theories.Shai Mulinari - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (4):309-310.
    I am grateful to Dien Ho and James Phillips for their comments on my article. Although they approach the topic from different perspectives, they both seem to find my account of the evolution of monoamine theories into neuroplasticity theories to be compelling. They especially seem to find my principal argument to be persuasive: Until quite recently, the use of drugs to generate and test pathophysiological hypotheses—the pharmacological bridge—has been a paramount driving force in psychiatric research.In his thoughtful commentary, Phillips is (...)
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  21. Psychological Disadvantage and a Welfarist Approach to Psychiatry.Rebecca Roache & Julian Savulescu - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (4):245-259.
    There is an apparent epidemic of mental illness. At the end of 2011, untreated mental disorders accounted for 13% of the total global burden of disease, and for 25.3% and 33.5% of all years lived with a disability in low-and middle-income countries, respectively. Depression affects 350 million people globally and is the leading cause of disability. One in five U.S. adults takes psychiatric medication. One study found that by age 32, 50% of people surveyed qualified for an anxiety disorder, more (...)
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  22. Why Philosophy?Anastasia Philippa Scrutton - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (4):285-287.
    My thanks go to Marcia Webb and Warren Kinghorn for their thoughtful and stimulating commentaries, one drawing attention to clinical studies of religion and depression and neuroscientific studies of determinism and free will, and the other making a case for a theological rather than philosophical argument against Christian voluntarism. In combination, the commentaries raise an important question about what a philosophical approach might valuably bring to the topics surrounding this paper, Kinghorn's by raising an explicit challenge to this end and (...)
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  23. Contextualism as a Solution to Paternalism in Psychiatric Practice.Natalia Washington - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (4):235-243.
    Self-knowledge is a difficult thing. Many have had the experience of knowing that a friend or partner is in a bad mood before she herself realizes it. Similarly, with mental illness it seems that a person may be sick without realizing it, or even while denying it outright. Anosognosia, the lack of awareness that one is mentally ill, is most visible in cases of dementia or brain damage, but recent insights in psychology have shown that healthy human beings too generally (...)
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  24. Pathologies of Thought and First-Person Authority.Michael Young - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (3):151-159.
    Insofar as psychiatrists and neurologists tend to the cognitive well-being of others, their work is interwoven with philosophical concerns and theoretical assumptions about the nature of the mind, its myriad functions, and the conditions governing its multiform pathologies. That the mind figures so prominently in their ordinary language attests to the wealth of insights that stands to be gained through a dialogue with philosophy. In one of the earliest efforts to taxonomize psychiatric medicine, Allgemeine Psychopathologie, Jaspers incisively remarks that "the (...)
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  25. A Role for Philosophers, Sociologists and Bioethicists in Revising the DSM: A Philosophical Case Conference.Browne Tamara Kayali - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (3):187-201.
    The creation of the latest version of psychiatry's 'bible' has been surrounded by a great deal of controversy. The latest revision, the DSM-5, contains several controversial diagnoses that have been the subject of much debate. One of the central criticisms of DSM-5 is that it pathologizes some behaviors that were previously considered simply problematic, or variations of normal behavior—for example, fidgetiness, noisiness, abundance of energy, shyness, anxiety, and bereavement. Diagnoses such as Binge Eating Disorder, Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder...
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  26. Delusions, Acceptances, and Cognitive Feelings.Richard Dub - 2017 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 94 (1):27-60.
    Psychopathological delusions have a number of features that are curiously difficult to explain. Delusions are resistant to counterevidence and impervious to counterargument. Delusions are theoretically, affectively, and behaviorally circumscribed: delusional individuals often do not act on their delusions and often do not update beliefs on the basis of their delusions. Delusional individuals are occasionally able to distinguish their delusions from other beliefs, sometimes speaking of their “delusional reality.” To explain these features, I offer a model according to which, contrary to (...)
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  27. Are We Prosaic Deep Inside?: Depression Memoirs, Resourceful Narratives, and the Biomedical Model of Depression.Anne E. Johnson - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):299-301.
    In “Prozac or Prosaic Diaries?”, Ginger Hoffman and Jennifer Hansen examine gendered messages in popular depression memoirs, using narrative self-constitution theory to emphasize the damaging effects such messages can have on women readers. In doing so, they bring a welcome feminist perspective to matters of mental health, as well as raising thought-provoking questions about depression memoirs, a genre that can have a far-reaching impact on public opinions about mental illness. Overall, Hoffman and Hansen do an excellent job of explaining the (...)
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  28. Dimensions of the Self in Emotion and Psychopathology: Consequences for Self-Management in Anxiety and Depression.Gerrit Glas - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (2):143-155.
    Over the last years, self-management has become a central value in the practice of mental health care. Patients are positioned as expertclients who are actively involved in the management of their disease. Some of the ideas that are implied in the concept of self-management may raise important and intriguing questions. For instance, in the context of psychiatry impaired agency and altered self-experience are often part of the psychopathological process itself. The capacity to manage oneself may be impeded by the very (...)
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  29. Self and Identity in Borderline Personality Disorder: Agency and Mental Time Travel.Natalie Gold & Michalis Kyratsous - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (5):1020-1028.
  30. Folk Psychology Wins the DAY! Daubert and the Challenge of False Confessions.Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (3):269-281.
    It has been more than 20 years since the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark decision in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. on the admissibility of scientific expert witness testimony in legal proceedings. It is time, perhaps, to look back at the history of Daubert decisions to determine whether it and its progeny have lived up to their collective promises to keep bad science out of the courtroom, while allowing in good, especially where the mind and brain sciences are concerned.In this (...)
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  31. Responding to Incomprehensibility: On the Clinical Role of Anonymity in Bodily Symptoms.Line Ryberg Ingerslev & Dorothée Legrand - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (1):73-76.
    We are grateful to René Rosfort for his comment on our target paper Clinical Response to Bodily Symptoms in Psychopathology. Rosfort’s remarks lead us here to specify an important point which our initial proposal may have left too implicit. Within the realm of clinical practice in psychopathology, we argue that bodily manifestations can be offered an expressive space and that they can be listened to in the clinical encounter as being part of the patient’s speech whereby she, by way of (...)
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  32. Mental Disorder as a Practical Psychiatric Kind.Brian O'Connor - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):1-13.
    There are different ways of responding to the absence of a shared physical causal core among the range of mental disorders currently recognized by the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Obviously enough, some of the listed disorders are not physically explicable in principle, while others are merely likely to be biological in origin. Only a minority of disorders can be explained as the outcomes of impaired biological function, (...)
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  33. Browne's External DSM Ethical Review Panel: That Dog Won't Hunt.Pouncey Claire & F. Merz Jon - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (3):227-230.
    Before we respond to Tamara Browne's proposal for an external ethics advisory review panel to oversee content in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, we wish to introduce ourselves. One of us is a professor of bioethics, a lawyer, and a doctor of public policy, and one of us is a philosopher of psychiatry who studies psychiatric nosology, and who has done bioethics work for two congressional advisory agencies. Based on our backgrounds, we flatter ourselves that we might (...)
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  34. Saving the Explananda.Georg Repnikov - 2017 - In Kenneth S. Kendler & Joseph Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry IV: Psychiatric Nosology. Oxford, UK: pp. 274-281.
    Do our diagnostic terms refer? If they do not, what implications does this have for our understanding of the practice of validation in psychiatry? These are the questions raised and addressed in the main part of John Campbell’s contribution to this volume, and the ones we will focus on in our reply. While we are sympathetic to Campbell’s contentions that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) style of validation needs reassessment, and that causality should play a more (...)
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  35. The Opacity of Bodily Symptoms: Anonymous Meaning in Psychopathology.Rosfort René - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (1):69-71.
    Through an original combination of phenomenology and psychoanalysis, Ingerslev and Legrand argue convincingly for a complex theoretical framework for making sense of bodily symptoms in psychopathology. The argument is particularly interesting because it manages to show how the theoretical efforts to arrive at a better understanding of bodily symptoms are connected closely with the ethical demand involved in the dialogical situation of therapy. The framework thus operates on two interconnected levels, on the one hand ensuring a more careful clinical differentiation (...)
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  36. What Is the Philosopher's Role in Interdisciplinary Research?Derek Strijbos - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (1):17-19.
    Do psychopaths suffer from impairments that undermine their capacity for moral reasoning and behavior? And, if so, does that mean they are not morally responsible for their actions? The first, empirical question might seem to be rather straightforward, whereas the second, philosophical question might seem more complex and therefore more difficult to answer. In their rich and thought-provoking paper, Jalava and Griffiths target the first question. They forcefully remind us of the fact that answering empirical questions can be just as (...)
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  37. The Intersubjective Dimension of Schizophrenia.Zeno Van Duppen - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):399-418.
    For more than 20 years now, the phenomenological approach to schizophrenia has developed a strong and influential hypothesis on the basic alterations of this disorder. Schizophrenia, it is claimed, is a disorder of subjectivity, and more specifically, a disorder of the minimal self. This ‘minimal self’ aims to describe the most basic or core self, which is considered to be foundational for every other kind of self. It is a form of minimal self-awareness that precedes every explicit or reflective self-awareness. (...)
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  38. The Meaning and Relevance of Minkowski's 'Loss of Vital Contact with Reality'.Zeno Van Duppen - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):385-397.
    Phenomenological psychopathology is a research field that aims to investigate and describe the subjective experience of mental disorders. By suspending the assumptions about etiology and causality as much as possible, and by focusing on the subjective experiences of the patient, it is supposed to offer a profound understanding of the patient’s suffering, and of the disorder in general. Clarity in the description of these experiences is, therefore, a necessity. Traditionally, phenomenological psychopathology was studied mostly by European, and particularly by German (...)
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  39. Mental Disorder, Methodology, and Meaning.Peter Zachar - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (1):45-48.
    In this brief commentary, I would like to discuss two reservations I have about the article by Bergner and Bunford. Before doing so let me make some preliminary remarks.Their hypothesis that the concept of disability unites the various mental disorder constructs that have been proposed over the centuries and across cultures is reasonable and accords well with common sense. The concept of disability does a lot of good work in helping us to understand mental disorders.With respect to the authors’ contrast (...)
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  40. The Psychiatric Hegemon and the Limits of Resistance.Bruce M. Z. Cohen - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):301-303.
    To consider power as not only the direct physical oppression of others, but as a production of authority through discursive knowledge and a claimed ‘expertise’ of the world, has been one of Foucault’s great legacies to critical work on mental health and illness. As arbiters of the ‘truth’ on what is and what is not mental pathology, I agree with Swerdfager that the privileged knowledge of the mental health professions and the consequential marginalization of other forms of knowledge on distress (...)
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  41. Jakob Friedrich Fries und die moderne Psychiatrie.Kay Herrmann - 2016 - E-Journal Philosophie der Psychologie 22 (2016).
    Dieser Aufsatz will zeigen, dass die Beiträge von Jakob Friedrich Fries (1773–1843) zur Psychiatrie leider (zu Unrecht) vergessen, aber überaus aktuell sind. Seine Überlegungen sowie die der Wissenschaftler, die ihm gefolgt sind, haben in den Darstellungen der Geschichte der Psychiatrie mehr Beachtung verdient.
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  42. Out of Our Skulls: How the Extended Mind Thesis Can Extend Psychiatry.Ginger A. Hoffman - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (8):1160-1174.
    The thesis that mental states extend beyond the skull, otherwise known as the extended mind thesis, has attracted considerable philosophical attention and support. It has also been accused of lacking practical import. At the same time, the field of psychiatry has remained largely unacquainted with ExM, tending to rely instead upon what ExM proponents would consider to be outdated models of the mind. ExM and psychiatry, therefore, have much to offer one another, but the connection between the two has remained (...)
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  43. Are Mental Disorders Natural Kinds?: A Plea for a New Approach to Intervention in Psychiatry.Şerife Tekin - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (2):147-163.
    Mental disorder is an urgent and growing public health problem.1 Scientific investigation of this problem has the pragmatic goals of identifying the causes of mental disorders and developing strategies to effectively treat them. Philosophers of psychiatry have participated in the inquiry into the empirical examination of mental disorders, predominantly by debating whether psychopathology is a legitimate target of scientific inquiry and, if so, how mental disorders should be explained, predicted, and intervened on. However, as I show in this paper, these (...)
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  44. Disciplines, Difference, and Representational Authority: Making Moves Through Inclusionary Practices.Voronka Jijian - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):211-214.
    Pattadath and Rose, in their thoughtful responses, create room for textual dialogue by making connections and thinking about madness, lived experience, and research and knowledge production in other contexts. I am grateful for this engagement, and the opportunity to clarify my own thoughts, as well as generate new ones.Rose makes crucial points about the relative silence in many critical fields outside of Disability and Mad Studies and their “probably unknowing refusal to see madness as political”. This is often the case, (...)
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  45. Mapping the Association of Global Executive Functioning Onto Diverse Measures of Psychopathic Traits.Arielle R. Baskin-Sommers, Inti A. Brazil, Jonathan Ryan, Nathaniel J. Kohlenberg, Craig S. Neumann & Joseph P. Newman - 2015 - Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment 6:336–346.
    Psychopathic individuals display a callous-coldhearted approach to interpersonal and affective situations and engage in impulsive and antisocial behaviors. Despite early conceptualizations suggesting that psychopathy is related to enhanced cognitive functioning, research examining executive functioning (EF) in psychopathy has yielded few such findings. It is possible that some psychopathic trait dimensions are more related to EF than others. Research using a 2-factor or 4-facet model of psychopathy highlights some dimension-specific differences in EF, but this research is limited in scope. Another complicating (...)
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  46. Autonomy, Judgment, and Theories of the Good.Brent M. Kious - 2015 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (1):21-24.
    I am grateful for the insightful comments that have been furnished by Drs. Gala, Moseley, and Perring following their reading of my paper. Happily, I find myself in the position of being able to accept many of their criticisms, which identify many of the limitations of my argument as I see them. In only a few cases do I feel that their remarks are misplaced.The first concern raised by Moseley and Gala is that the paper gives the regrettable impression that (...)
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  47. The Moral Brain: Psychopathology.Caroline Moul, David Hawes & Mark Dadds - 2015 - In Jean Decety & Thalia Wheatly (eds.), The Moral Brain. The MIT Press. pp. 253-264.
    This chapter considers two systems that are fundamental to human behavior: learning and the allocation of attention. We review the evidence to suggest that there may be deficits in these systems in a subset of children with antisocial behavior problems-those with high levels of callous-unemotional traits-and explore how altered function of these systems might contribute to the development of immoral behavior.
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  48. Altered Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Cortical Networks in Psychopathy.Carissa L. Philippi, Maia S. Pujara, Julian C. Motzkin, Joseph P. Newman, Kent A. Kiehl & Michael Koenigs - 2015 - The Journal of Neuroscience 35 (15):6068 – 6078.
    Psychopathy is a personality disorder characterized by callous antisocial behavior and criminal recidivism. Here we examine whether psychopathy is associated with alterations in functional connectivity in three large-scale cortical networks. Using fMRI in 142 adult male prison inmates, we computed resting-state functional connectivity using seeds from the default mode network, frontoparietal network, and cingulo-opercular network. To determine the specificity of our findings to these cortical networks, we also calculated functional connectivity using seeds from two comparison primary sensory networks: visual and (...)
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  49. The Making of DSM-III: A Diagnostic Manual’s Conquest of American Psychiatry by Hannah S. Decker. [REVIEW]Georg Repnikov - 2015 - Journal of the History of the Neurosciences 24:208-2011.
  50. Views of Addiction Neuroscientists and Clinicians on the Clinical Impact of a 'Brain Disease Model of Addiction'.Stephanie Bell, Adrian Carter, Rebecca Mathews, Coral Gartner, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (1):19-27.
    Addiction is increasingly described as a “chronic and relapsing brain disease”. The potential impact of the brain disease model on the treatment of addiction or addicted individuals’ treatment behaviour remains uncertain. We conducted a qualitative study to examine: (i) the extent to which leading Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians accept the brain disease view of addiction; and (ii) their views on the likely impacts of this view on addicted individuals’ beliefs and behaviour. Thirty-one Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians (10 females (...)
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