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  1. Gwen Adshead (2010). Looking Backward and Forward. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (3):251-253.
    Philosophy says that life must be understood backwards. But . . . it must be lived forward. . , , It is more and more evident that life can never be really understood in Time. It was a pleasure to read Jason Thompson’s serious and thought-provoking piece, and I am grateful to the editors for giving me a chance to comment. The idea that the self is revealed in narrative is a popular one among different schools of psychotherapy, both in (...)
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  2. Hakam Al-Shawi (2006). Psychotherapy's Philosophical Values: Insight or Absorption? [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):159 - 179.
    According to insight-oriented psychotherapies, the change clients undergo during therapy results from insights gained into the "true" nature of the self, which entail greater self-knowledge and self-understanding. In this paper, I question such claims through a critical examination of the epistemological and metaphysical values underlying such forms of therapy. I claim that such psychotherapeutic practices are engaged in a process that subtly "absorbs" clients into the therapist's philosophical framework which is characterized by a certain problematic conception of subjectivity, knowledge, and (...)
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  3. Hakam Al-Shawi (2006). Psychotherapy’s Philosophical Values: Insight or Absorption? Human Studies 29 (2):159-179.
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  4. Hakam H. Al-Shawi (ed.) (2011). Reconstructing Subjects: A Philosophical Critique of Psychotherapy. Rodopi.
    This work is about the deceptive nature of psychotherapy. In particular, it is about those therapies that claim to provide the client with insight and self-knowledge when in practice they are a means of social control absorbing clients into socially acceptable norms. Through a philosophical analysis of key concepts such as knowledge, insight, and subjectivity, and through an examination of mechanisms intrinsic to psychotherapeutic practice, such as power, interpretation, and suggestion, this monograph unveils how psychotherapy deludes clients into believing they (...)
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  5. George Albee (1990). The Futility of Psychotherapy. Journal of Mind and Behavior 11 (3-4):369-384.
    While psychotherapy is helpful to individual clients, the slim cadre of therapists and the vast number of disturbed people precludes any hope that more than a relative few will receive help. Nowhere is the futility of psycotherapy as obvious as among the poor and powerless whose suffering, crowding, and dispair will yield only to social and political solutions. In the United States the expansion of the number of psychiatric diagnoses and the demographic changes in populations will only make larger the (...)
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  6. Peter Alexander & A. Macintyre (1955). Cause and Cure in Psychotherapy. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 29:25-58.
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  7. Peter Alexander & A. MacIntyre (1955). Symposium: Cause and Cure in Psychotherapy. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 29 (1):25 - 58.
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  8. David M. Allen (1988). Unifying Individual and Family Therapies.
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  9. Michaela Amering (2010). Finding Partnership: The Benefit of Sharing and the Capacity for Complexity. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):77-79.
  10. Roger T. Ames, Thomas P. Kasulis & Wimal Dissanayake (1998). Self as Image in Asian Theory and Practice.
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  11. James Robert Amundsen (1992). Psychotherapy and Meaning: Toward a Theory of Pastoral Psychotherapy. Dissertation, The Fielding Institute
    This work presents a theoretical construction of a philosophy of pastoral psychotherapy. It takes as its starting point the need to construct a philosophy of pastoral psychotherapy based in the reality of both a religious and psychological dimension to the experience of psychotherapy. The ontological hermeneutics of Hans Gadamer and Martin Heidegger is proposed as an intelligible and adequate ontological edifice upon which pastoral psychotherapy can be understood as an integration of the religious and psychological dimensions of experience in psychotherapy. (...)
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  12. Harlene Anderson (1997). Conversation, Language, and Possibilities a Postmodern Approach to Therapy.
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  13. John Anderson (1954). Psychology and Psychotherapy. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 32:48.
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  14. Sharon K. Anderson (2010). Ethics for Psychotherapists and Counselors: A Proactive Approach. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Basics of awareness : knowing yourself -- Basics of awareness : privilege and social responsibility -- The process of acculturation : developing your professional ethical identity -- The ethical culture of psychotherapy -- "I can't believe it's not therapy" : boundaries of the psychotherapy relationship -- Confidentiality : a critical element of trust in the relationship -- Informed consent : the three-legged stool -- Making the most of supervision -- Ending psychotherapy : the good, the bad, and the ethical -- (...)
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  15. Sharon K. Anderson, Hilary E. Franco & Mitchell M. Handelsman (2000). Psychotherapists' Judgments of Psychotherapy Regulation. Ethics and Behavior 10 (2):173 – 183.
    In 1988, Colorado instituted a new regulatory system that was opposed by psychologists and social workers. We surveyed 306 psychotherapists about their attitudes regarding this system, which included profession-specific licensing boards and an omnibus (multiprofession) board to handle grievances. Social workers and psychologists, members of more established professions, opposed creating an omnibus licensing board and favored the return of profession-specific grievance functions. Members of the newer professions (professional counseling and marriage and family therapy) and unlicensed psychotherapists were not as opposed (...)
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  16. Stephen A. Appelbaum (2000). Evocativeness Moving and Persuasive Interventions in Psychotherapy.
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  17. Patricia A. Areán & Jennifer Alvidrez (2002). Ethical Considerations in Psychotherapy Effectiveness Research: Choosing the Comparison Group. Ethics and Behavior 12 (1):63 – 73.
    The primary purpose behind effectiveness research is to determine whether a treatment with demonstrated efficacy has utility when administered to the general population. The main questions these studies are meant to answer are these: Can the typical patient respond to treatment? Is the treatment acceptable to the typical patient? Can the treatment be administered safely and in its entirety in the typical treatment setting? Is the treatment under study significantly better than the community standard of care both from a cost (...)
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  18. Katherine Arens (1996). Wilhelm Griesinger: Psychiatry Between Philosophy and Praxis. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (3):147-163.
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  19. John S. Auerbach, Kenneth N. Levy & Carrie E. Schaffer (eds.) (2016). Relatedness, Self-Definition and Mental Representation: Essays in Honor of Sidney J. Blatt. Routledge.
    Over the course of a long and distinguished career, psychologist and psychoanalyst Sidney J. Blatt has made major contributions to cognitive-developmental theory, psychoanalytic object relations theory, applied psychoanalysis, and current research in the areas of psychopathology and psychotherapy. This book presents chapters by Dr. Blatt's many colleagues and students who address the key areas in which Dr Blatt focuses his intellectual endeavours: *Personality development *Psychopathology *Issues in psychological testing and assessment *Psychotherapy and the treatment process *Applied psychoanalysis and broader cultural (...)
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  20. Barbara E. Baer & Nancy L. Murdock (1995). Nonerotic Dual Relationships Between Therapists and Clients: The Effects of Sex, Theoretical Orientation, and Interpersonal Boundaries. Ethics and Behavior 5 (2):131 – 145.
    We surveyed 223 APA members to investigate the roles of therapists' sex, theoretical orientation, interpersonal boundaries, and clients' sex in predicting therapists' assessments of the ethicality of nonerotic dual relationships with their clients. Results indicated that therapists' sex, interpersonal boundaries, and theoretical orientation influenced ethical judgments of these relationships. Theoretical and practical implications of our findings are discussed.
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  21. Kurt Baier (1981). The Ethics of Behavior Modification:Behavior Therapy: Scientific, Philosophical, and Moral Foundations. Edward Erwin; Autonomy Psychotherapy: Authoritarian Control Versus Individual Choice. Lucien A. Buck. [REVIEW] Ethics 91 (3):499-.
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  22. John R. Baker (1992). The Gateway to Inner Space: Sacred Plants, Mysticism and Psychotherapy:The Gateway to Inner Space: Sacred Plants, Mysticism and Psychotherapy. Anthropology of Consciousness 3 (3-4):36-37.
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  23. Robert L. Barker (1982). The Business of Psychotherapy: Private Practice Administration for Therapists, Counselors, and Social Workers. Columbia University Press.
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  24. Fiona Palmer Barnes (1998). Complaints and Grievances in Psychotherapy a Handbook of Ethical Practice.
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  25. Roann Barris, Gary Kielhofner & Janet Hawkins Watts (1988). Bodies of Knowledge in Psychosocial Practice.
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  26. F. C. Bartlett (1936). Psychology and Psychotherapy. By William Brown. (London: Edward Arnold and Co.. 1934. Pp. Vii + 252. Price 12s. 6d.). Philosophy 11 (42):229-.
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  27. S. Basescu (1967). Human Nature and Psychotherapy. Humanitas 3 (2):127-137.
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  28. Anthony Bateman, Dennis Brown & Jonathan Pedder (2010). Introduction to Psychotherapy: An Outline of Psychodynamic Principles and Practice, Fourth Edition. Routledge.
    This fourth edition of _Introduction to Psychotherapy_ builds on the success of the previous three editions and remains an essential purchase for trainee psychotherapists, psychiatrists and other professionals. It has been revised and extended to capture some of the current themes, controversies and issues relevant to psychotherapy as it is practised today. Bateman has added new chapters on attachment theory and personality disorder and has developed further the research sections on selection and outcome. His new chapter on further therapies covers (...)
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  29. Dr Anthony Bateman, Dennis Brown & Jonathon Pedder (2000). Introduction to Psychotherapy: An Outline of Psychodynamic Principles and Practice. Routledge.
    _What is psychotherapy about?_ _What are the similarities and differences of its many forms?_ _What are the most recent developments in the field?_ _Introduction to Psychotherapy_ has been an essential reference book since its publication in 1979, and is regularly included in reading lists for trainee psychotherapists, psychiatrists and other professionals. It is often recommended to interested lay people and prospective patients. This third edition takes into account recent changes in psychotherapy theory, practice and research. The authors are all psychoanalysts. (...)
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  30. Alexander Batthyany, Pninit Russo-Netzer & Stefan Schulenberg (eds.) (forthcoming). Clinical Perspectives on Meaning: Positive and Existential Psychotherapy. Springer.
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  31. Joseph Morgan Bauserman & Warren R. Rule (1995). A Brief History of Systems Approaches in Counseling and Psychotherapy.
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  32. Manu Bazzano & Julie Webb (eds.) (2016). Therapy and the Counter-Tradition: The Edge of Philosophy. Routledge.
    _Therapy & the Counter-tradition: The Edge of Philosophy_ brings together leading exponents of contemporary psychotherapy, philosophers and writers, to explore how philosophical ideas may inform therapy work. Each author discusses a particular philosopher who has influenced their life and therapeutic practice, while questioning how counselling and psychotherapy can address human ‘wholeness’, despite the ascendancy of rationality, regulation and diagnosis. It also seeks to acknowledge the distinct lack of philosophical input and education in counselling and psychotherapy training. The chapters are rooted (...)
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  33. B. Beit-Hallahmi (1987). The Psychotherapy Subculture: Practice and Ideology. Social Science Information 26 (3):475-492.
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  34. Michael Bennett (2004). The Purpose of Counselling and Psychotherapy.
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  35. Sergio Benvenuto (2005). Simplistic Complexity: A Discussion on Psychoanalysis and Chaos Theory. World Futures 61 (3):181 – 187.
    Using a couple of Paul Watzlawick's clinical cases as a starting point, the author shows how prescriptive behavioral strategies do not produce predictable effects: the theory of (nonlinear) complex systems prevents us from establishing a precise connection between a so-called psychotherapeutic act and what we consider therapeutic effects. It is precisely the consideration of the "Lorenz attractors" that thus brings us to reconsider the long psychoanalytic work as the condition for a general structural change of subjectivity: the result of this (...)
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  36. Louis S. Berger (1996). Toward a Non-Cartesian Psychotherapeutic Framework: Radical Pragmatism as an Alternative. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (3):169-184.
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  37. Jurrit Bergsma (1994). The Trauma Triangle. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (4).
    Recent research supports the hypothesis that more active engagement of the patient in occurring illnesses improves quality of life and probably even life expectancy.In this study experience and theoretical knowledge from psychotherapy is transplanted to clinical practice in order to improve the physician''s engagement in the patient-disease relationship. By defining severe and long-term illnesses as a psychotrauma, the transfer of the psychotherapeutical model leads to the creation of a new triangular relationship: patient-illness-doctor. Practical examples are used as illustrations for the (...)
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  38. Jurrit Bergsma & Bertha Mook (1998). Ethical Considerations in Psychotherapeutic Systems. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (4):371-381.
    In the process of individual psychotherapy, the client and the therapist work together towards clarifying the client's problems, unlocking vicious circles, opening new perspectives and creating a new narrative congruent with the client's experiencing. The real and undeniable situation in individual psychotherapy across different therapeutic systems is that therapists enter the therapeutic encounter equipped with their own vision of humanity and their own particular theory and methods of psychotherapy. Through the differences in power between therapists and clients and the powerful (...)
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  39. Paul Biegler (2010). Autonomy and Ethical Treatment in Depression. Bioethics 24 (4):179-189.
    Antidepressant medication and evidence-based psychotherapy have largely equivalent efficacy in the management of the common, less severe grades of depression. As a result, several national guidelines recommend that either can be used in the treatment of this disorder. Psychotherapy, however, differs in that it assists insight into how the depressed person appraises and manages the stressors that frequently trigger depressive episodes. I argue that the self-knowledge achieved through psychotherapy has moral value in that it promotes the autonomy of stressor-related decisions. (...)
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  40. P. Binns (1990). Experimental Evidence and Psychotherapy. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (4):531-552.
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  41. Pamela J. Birrell (2006). An Ethic of Possibility: Relationship, Risk, and Presence. Ethics and Behavior 16 (2):95 – 115.
    What does it mean to be ethical in psychotherapy? Does adherence to ethical codes and rules make a psychotherapist ethical? This article examines standard ways of thinking about ethics in the field and argues that these ways are inadequate, creating a false dichotomy between the ethical and the clinical, and that they are designed only for formal and contractual relationships, in which psychotherapy is more often personal and affecting. The ethic of care and the approach to ethics of Emmanuel Levinas (...)
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  42. Daniel Miller Blair (1979). Paradoxical Outcome in Psychotherapy. Dissertation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
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  43. Sidney Bloch (ed.) (2006). An Introduction to the Psychotherapies. Oxford University Press UK.
    'Psychotherapy' is a nebulous term with widely different connotations. Anyone embarking on training in psychotherapy will find themselves faced with a bewildering range of possible therapies from which to choose. Which treatments are effective? What theories underlie a particular treatment method? What techniques are used in a particular treatment? In what circumstances is a particular treatment appropriate? In what circumstances is it inappropriate?In the past thirty years, Sidney Bloch's Introduction to the Psychotherapies has established itself as the leading introductory text (...)
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  44. David Boadella (2015). Lifestreams: An Introduction to Biosynthesis. Routledge.
    Biosynthesis means "integration of life". It is a holistic form of body psychotherapy, which was founded over forty-five years ago. The concept of life-streams is one of its major foundations, which has since been supported by research in neurobiology. How can we integrate the three most important domains of being human: our bodily existence, our psychological experience and our spiritual essence? Biosynthesis Therapy has developed a broad spectrum of reliable methods to make this possible and to free our life energy. (...)
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  45. Tim Bond (2000). Standards and Ethics for Counselling in Action. Sage Publications.
    Standards and Ethics for Counselling in Action is the highly acclaimed guide to the major responsibilities which trainees and counselors in practice must be aware of before working with clients. Author Tim Bond outlines the values and ethical principles inherent in counselling and points out that the counselor is at the center of a series of responsibilities: to the client, to him/herself as a counselor and to the wider community. Now fully revised and updated, the second edition examines issues fundamental (...)
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  46. Sally Borbasi (2007). Embodied Enquiry: Phenomenological Touchstones for Research, Psychotherapy and Spirituality, Les Todres: Book Review. [REVIEW] Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 7 (2):1-3.
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  47. William Borden (2016). Neuroscience, Psychotherapy and Clinical Pragmatism. Routledge.
    This volume explores how conceptions of pragmatism set forth in American philosophy serve as orienting perspectives in psychotherapy. Drawing on the influential contributions of William James and John Dewey, the author demonstrates how realistic, comparative approaches to understanding strengthen everyday therapeutic practice. He also examines recent developments in neuroscience that shape training and practice in the broader field of psychotherapy, encompassing psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive and humanistic traditions. By following a clinical pragmatism, psychotherapy can be viewed as an instrumental project that (...)
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  48. Edward Boyne (ed.) (2003). Psychotherapy in Ireland. Columba Press.
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  49. Kerry Brace (1992). Nonrelativist Ethical Standards for Goal Setting in Psychotherapy. Ethics and Behavior 2 (1):15 – 38.
    In this article, I discuss two principles that can be viewed as universally applicable in psychotherapy and counseling: respect for clients' welfare and respect for their self-determination. Consideration of the practical application of these principles leads to the formulation of a set of guidelines to aid therapists and counselors in making choices about instrumental and end goals. These guidelines are intended to be applicable regardless of the particular personal and cultural values of the therapist and client.
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  50. Kerry Brace & Leon VandeCreek (1991). The Justification of Paternalistic Actions in Psychotherapy. Ethics and Behavior 1 (2):87 – 103.
    This article defines the nature of paternalistic interventions in psychotherapy and discusses reasons why the client's right to consent to treatment is important. We describe a reasoning process developed by Culver and Gert (1982) that can be used to determine when paternalistic actions are and are not ethically justifiable in mental health practice. We demonstrate how this procedure may be applied to psychotherapy by using a number of case illustrations.
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