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  1. added 2020-05-05
    Opioid Treatment Agreements and Patient Accountability.Larisa Svirsky - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
    Opioid treatment agreements are written agreements between physicians and patients enumerating the risks associated with opioid medications along with the requirements that patients must meet to receive these medications on an ongoing basis. The choice to use such agreements goes beyond the standard informed consent process, and has a distinctive symbolic significance. Specifically, it suggests that physicians regard it as important to hold their patients accountable for adhering to various protocols regarding the use of their opioid medications. After laying out (...)
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  2. added 2020-04-02
    Nudging Immunity: The Case for Vaccinating Children in School and Day Care by Default.Alberto Giubilini, Lucius Caviola, Hannah Maslen, Thomas Douglas, Anne-Marie Nussberger, Nadira Faber, Samantha Vanderslott, Sarah Loving, Mark Harrison & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (4):325-344.
    Many parents are hesitant about, or face motivational barriers to, vaccinating their children. In this paper, we propose a type of vaccination policy that could be implemented either in addition to coercive vaccination or as an alternative to it in order to increase paediatric vaccination uptake in a non-coercive way. We propose the use of vaccination nudges that exploit the very same decision biases that often undermine vaccination uptake. In particular, we propose a policy under which children would be vaccinated (...)
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  3. added 2020-04-02
    Philosophical Medical Ethics: More Necessary Than Ever.Julian Savulescu, Thomas Douglas & Dominic Wilkinson - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):434-435.
    When we applied for the editorship of the JME 7 years ago, we said that we considered the JME to be the most important journal in medicine. The most profound questions that health professionals face are not scientific or technical, but ethical. Our enormous scientific and medical progress already outstrips our capability to provide treatment. Life can be prolonged at enormous cost, sometimes far beyond the point that the individual appears to be gaining a net benefit from that life. Science (...)
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  4. added 2020-04-02
    Influenza Vaccination Strategies Should Target Children.Ben Bambery, Thomas Douglas, Michael J. Selgelid, Hannah Maslen, Alberto Giubilini, Andrew J. Pollard & Julian Savulescu - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (2):221-234.
    Strategies to increase influenza vaccination rates have typically targeted healthcare professionals and individuals in various high-risk groups such as the elderly. We argue that they should focus on increasing vaccination rates in children. Because children suffer higher influenza incidence rates than any other demographic group, and are major drivers of seasonal influenza epidemics, we argue that influenza vaccination strategies that serve to increase uptake rates in children are likely to be more effective in reducing influenza-related morbidity and mortality than those (...)
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  5. added 2020-04-02
    Refusing to Treat Sexual Dysfunction in Sex Offenders.Thomas Douglas - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (1):143-158.
    This article examines one kind of conscientious refusal: the refusal of healthcare professionals to treat sexual dysfunction in individuals with a history of sexual offending. According to what I call the orthodoxy, such refusal is invariably impermissible, whereas at least one other kind of conscientious refusal—refusal to offer abortion services—is not. I seek to put pressure on the orthodoxy by (1) motivating the view that either both kinds of conscientious refusal are permissible or neither is, and (2) critiquing two attempts (...)
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  6. added 2020-04-01
    Conscientious Objection in Medicine: Making it Public.Nir Ben-Moshe - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-21.
    The literature on conscientious objection in medicine presents two key problems that remain unresolved: Which conscientious objections in medicine are justified, if it is not feasible for individual medical practitioners to conclusively demonstrate the genuineness or reasonableness of their objections? How does one respect both medical practitioners’ claims of conscience and patients’ interests, without leaving practitioners complicit in perceived or actual wrongdoing? My aim in this paper is to offer a new framework for conscientious objections in medicine, which, by bringing (...)
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  7. added 2020-04-01
    The Internal Morality of Medicine: A Constructivist Approach.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2019 - Synthese 196 (11):4449-4467.
    Physicians frequently ask whether they should give patients what they want, usually when there are considerations pointing against doing so, such as medicine’s values and physicians’ obligations. It has been argued that the source of medicine’s values and physicians’ obligations lies in what has been dubbed “the internal morality of medicine”: medicine is a practice with an end and norms that are definitive of this practice and that determine what physicians ought to do qua physicians. In this paper, I defend (...)
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  8. added 2020-04-01
    The Truth Behind Conscientious Objection in Medicine.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):404-410.
    Answers to the questions of what justifies conscientious objection in medicine in general and which specific objections should be respected have proven to be elusive. In this paper, I develop a new framework for conscientious objection in medicine that is based on the idea that conscience can express true moral claims. I draw on one of the historical roots, found in Adam Smith’s impartial spectator account, of the idea that an agent’s conscience can determine the correct moral norms, even if (...)
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  9. added 2020-03-25
    Quantifying Health Across Populations.Stephen Kershnar - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (6):451-461.
    In this article, I argue that as a theoretical matter, a population's health-level is best quantified via averagism. Averagism asserts that the health of a population is the average of members’ health-levels. This model is better because it does not fall prey to a number of objections, including the repugnant conclusion, and because it is not arbitrary. I also argue that as a practical matter, population health-levels are best quantified via totalism. Totalism asserts that the health of a population is (...)
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  10. added 2020-01-29
    Nurses’ Perspectives on the Dismissal of Vaccine-Refusing Families From Pediatric and Family Care Practices.Michael J. Deem, Rebecca A. Kronk, Vincent S. Staggs & Denise Lucas - forthcoming - American Journal of Health Promotion.
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  11. added 2020-01-28
    Do a Surrogate Decision-Maker's Motives Matter?Michael J. Deem & Jennifer M. Stephen - 2020 - Nursing 50 (2):16-18.
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  12. added 2020-01-11
    Epistemic Injustice and Self-Injury: A Concept with Clinical Implications.Patrick Sullivan - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (4):349-362.
    SELF-INJURY IS A COMPLEX phenomenon that is encountered on a regular basis by health care professionals in mental health care. In this article, I use the concept of epistemic injustice to examine this complex phenomenon and argue that this helps us to understand developments in the way we think about and support people who self-injure. Individuals with lived experience have important knowledge about the nature of self-injury and particularly how it relates to them. If the credibility of this knowledge is (...)
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  13. added 2019-11-28
    The Dictates of Conscience: Can They Justify Conscientious Refusals in Healthcare Contexts?Mary Carman - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (2):303-315.
    In a recent article in this journal, Steve Clarke (2017) identifies two different bases for conscience-based refusals in healthcare: (1) all-things-considered moral judgments, and (2) the dictates of conscience. He argues that these two bases have distinct roles in justifying conscientious objection. However, accepting that there are these two bases, I argue that both are not able to justify conscientious objection. In particular, I argue that the second basis of the dictates of conscience cannot justify conscience-based refusal in a healthcare (...)
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  14. added 2019-11-15
    The Place for Religious Content in Clinical Ethics Consultations: A Reply to Janet Malek.Nicholas Colgrove & Kelly Kate Evans - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (4):305-323.
    Janet Malek (91–102, 2019) argues that a “clinical ethics consultant’s religious worldview has no place in developing ethical recommendations or communicating about them with patients, surrogates, and clinicians.” She offers five types of arguments in support of this thesis: arguments from consensus, clarity, availability, consistency, and autonomy. This essay shows that there are serious problems for each of Malek’s arguments. None of them is sufficient to motivate her thesis. Thus, if it is true that the religious worldview of clinical ethics (...)
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  15. added 2019-11-14
    The Debate on the Ethics of AI in Health Care: A Reconstruction and Critical Review.Jessica Morley, Caio C. V. Machado, Christopher Burr, Josh Cowls, Indra Joshi, Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - manuscript
    Healthcare systems across the globe are struggling with increasing costs and worsening outcomes. This presents those responsible for overseeing healthcare with a challenge. Increasingly, policymakers, politicians, clinical entrepreneurs and computer and data scientists argue that a key part of the solution will be ‘Artificial Intelligence’ (AI) – particularly Machine Learning (ML). This argument stems not from the belief that all healthcare needs will soon be taken care of by “robot doctors.” Instead, it is an argument that rests on the classic (...)
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  16. added 2019-10-30
    Digital Psychiatry: Ethical Risks and Opportunities for Public Health and Well-Being.Christopher Burr, Jessica Morley, Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2020 - IEEE Transactions on Technology and Society 1 (1):21-33.
    Common mental health disorders are rising globally, creating a strain on public healthcare systems. This has led to a renewed interest in the role that digital technologies may have for improving mental health outcomes. One result of this interest is the development and use of artificial intelligence for assessing, diagnosing, and treating mental health issues, which we refer to as ‘digital psychiatry’. This article focuses on the increasing use of digital psychiatry outside of clinical settings, in the following sectors: education, (...)
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  17. added 2019-10-04
    Hormone Replacement Therapy: Informed Consent Without Assessment?Toni C. Saad, Bruce Philip Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (12):1-2.
    Florence Ashley has argued that requiring patients with gender dysphoria to undergo an assessment and referral from a mental health professional before undergoing hormone replacement therapy is unethical and may represent an unconscious hostility towards transgender people. We respond, first, by showing that Ashley has conflated the self-reporting of symptoms with self-diagnosis, and that this is not consistent with the standard model of informed consent to medical treatment. Second, we note that the model of informed consent involved in cosmetic surgery (...)
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  18. added 2019-10-04
    Service Robots, Care Ethics, and Design.A. van Wynsberghe - 2016 - Ethics and Information Technology 18 (4):311-321.
    It should not be a surprise in the near future to encounter either a personal or a professional service robot in our homes and/or our work places: according to the International Federation for Robots, there will be approx 35 million service robots at work by 2018. Given that individuals will interact and even cooperate with these service robots, their design and development demand ethical attention. With this in mind I suggest the use of an approach for incorporating ethics into the (...)
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  19. added 2019-09-27
    Blameless Guilt: The Case of Carer Guilt and Chronic and Terminal Illness.Matthew Bennett - 2018 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 26 (1):72-89.
    My ambition in this paper is to provide an account of an unacknowledged example of blameless guilt that, I argue, merits further examination. The example is what I call carer guilt: guilt felt by nurses and family members caring for patients with palliative-care needs. Nurses and carers involved in palliative care often feel guilty about what they perceive as their failure to provide sufficient care for a patient. However, in some cases the guilty carer does not think that he has (...)
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  20. added 2019-09-12
    On the Duty to Care During Epidemics.Daniel Messelken - 2018 - In Daniel Messelken & David T. Winkler (eds.), Ethical Challenges for Military Health Care Personnel : Dealing with Epidemics. London, U.K.: Routledge. pp. 144-163.
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  21. added 2019-09-09
    Capacity for Preferences and Pediatric Assent: Implications for Pediatric Practice.Mark Christopher Navin & Jason Adam Wasserman - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (1):43-51.
  22. added 2019-09-09
    Why Should Medical Care Be Family-Centered?: Understanding Ethical Responsibilities for Patients' Family Members.Nate W. Olson - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (2):159-185.
    In recent years, hospitals, clinics, and professional organizations have with increasing frequency pledged their commitment to “patient-and family-centered care”. The movement toward PFCC is especially pronounced in pediatrics, where the American Academy of Pediatrics has a long-held, explicit commitment to PFCC. However, the unified movement toward PFCC obscures differing conceptions of its purpose. First, patient-centered care, as opposed to provider- or disease-centered care, focuses on increasing patient involvement in care to accomplish two related, but distinct objectives: improving health outcomes and (...)
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  23. added 2019-09-09
    Stephen Scher and Kasia Kozlowska: Rethinking Health Care Ethics: Palgrave Macmillan, Singapore, 2018, 169 Pp, $31, ISBN: 978-981-13-0829-1.Patrick Daly - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (4):347-351.
    Authors present a practical approach to developing health care trainees' native ability as moral agents to become responsible health care practitioners. Highly recommended. Full text available free online.
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  24. added 2019-09-09
    Reasons to Amplify the Role of Parental Permission in Pediatric Treatment.Mark Christopher Navin & Jason Adam Wasserman - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (11):6-14.
    Two new documents from the Committee on Bioethics of the American Academy of Pediatrics expand the terrain for parental decision making, suggesting that pediatricians may override only those parental requests that cross a harm threshold. These new documents introduce a broader set of considerations in favor of parental authority in pediatric care than previous AAP documents have embraced. While we find this to be a positive move, we argue that the 2016 AAP positions actually understate the importance of informed and (...)
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  25. added 2019-07-22
    Reconceptualizing Autonomy for Bioethics.Lisa Dive & Ainsley J. Newson - 2018 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (2):171-203.
    The concept of autonomy plays a central role in bioethics,1 but there is no consensus as to how we should understand it beyond a general notion of self-determination. The conception of autonomy deployed in applied ethics2 can have crucial ramifications when it is applied in real-world scenarios, so it is important to be clear. However, this clarity is often lacking when autonomy is discussed in the bioethics literature. In this paper we outline three different conceptions of autonomy, and argue that (...)
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  26. added 2019-06-25
    Human Values in Healthcare Ethics Introduction Many Voices: Human Values in Healthcare Ethics.K. W. M. Fulford, D. Dickenson & T. H. Murray - 2002
    This volume of articles, literature and case studies illustrates the central importance of human values throughout healthcare. The readings are structured around the main stages of the clinical encounter from the patient's perspective.
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  27. added 2019-06-06
    Health Care Ethics Consultation Competences and Standards: A Roadmap Still Needing a Compass.Keith Swetz & C. Hook - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (2):20-22.
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  28. added 2019-06-06
    Research Ethics: Harmonisation of Ethics Committees' Practice in 10 European Countries.R. Hernandez, M. Cooney, C. Dualé, M. Gálvez & S. Gaynor - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (11):696-700.
    Background: The Directive 2001/20/EC was an important first step towards consistency in the requirements and processes for clinical trials across Europe. However, by applying the same rules to all types of drug trials and transposing the Directive’s principles into pre-existing national legislations, the Directive somewhat failed to meet its facilitation and harmonisation targets. In the field of ethics, the Directive 2001/20/EC conditioned the way of understanding and transposing the “single opinion” process in each country. This led to a situation in (...)
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  29. added 2019-06-06
    Barriers and Challenges in Clinical Ethics Consultations: The Experiences of Nine Clinical Ethics Committees: Country Reports.Reidar Pedersen - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (8):460-469.
    Clinical ethics committees have recently been established in nearly all Norwegian hospital trusts. One important task for these committees is clinical ethics consultations. This qualitative study explores significant barriers confronting the ethics committees in providing such consultation services. The interviews with the committees indicate that there is a substantial need for clinical ethics support services and, in general, the committee members expressed a great deal of enthusiasm for the committee work. They also reported, however, that tendencies to evade moral disagreement, (...)
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  30. added 2019-06-06
    A French Perspective On Hospital Ethics Committees.Jean-Christophe Mino, Laure Copel & Jean-Michel Zucker - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (3):300-307.
    In this article we highlight the main points of the development of bioethics and ethics committees in France. We argue that the French cultural context of medicine and its current political transformations favor new models of hospital ethics committee and we provide an example of such a model developed at Paris's Institut Curie, the oldest French cancer treatment and research centre.
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  31. added 2019-06-06
    Holding the Hospital Hostage.Ferdinand D. Yates - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (3):36-37.
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  32. added 2019-06-06
    Dissatisfaction with Ethics Consultations: The Anna Karenina Principle.Lawrence Schneiderman - 2006 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (1):101-106.
    In a previously published multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled trial of more than 500 intensive care unit patients involved in conflicts over treatment decisions, ethics consultations were found to be helpful in resolving the conflicts and reducing nonbeneficial treatments. The intervention received favorable reviews by 80% of patient surrogates and more than 90% of physicians and nurses. Nevertheless, several participants in the ethics consultation process expressed dissatisfactions with the intervention. In this paper, we report our efforts to determine the factors associated (...)
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  33. added 2019-06-06
    Defining Personhood: Towards the Ethics of Quality in Clinical Care: Sarah Bishop Merrill, Amsterdam-Atlanta, Rodopi, 1998, 222 Pages, Pound24.50. [REVIEW]Steven Edwards - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (2):145-146.
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  34. added 2019-06-06
    Hospital Chaplaincy As Agapeic Intervention.J. J. Kotva - 1998 - Christian Bioethics 4 (3):257-275.
    The notion of hospital chaplaincy raises significant concerns, because it provides for the possibility that the chaplain becomes a generic chaplain rather than a member of a particular faith. Despite these reservations, however, I think that Mennonites should serve as hospital chaplains. Instead of seeing themselves as chaplains to all, though, Mennonites ought to see the service they provide as analogous to relief and development work. This would make Mennonite chaplaincy a form of what Mennonite scholar C. Norman Krause calls (...)
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  35. added 2019-06-06
    Teaching Bioethics to Future Health Professionals: A Case‐Based Clinical Model.Ruth Macklin - 1993 - Bioethics 7 (2-3):200-206.
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  36. added 2019-06-06
    A Hospital Ethics Committee At War: The Hospital Ship Mercy Experience During Operation Desert Shield And Operation Desert Storm.William Robert Kiser - 1992 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (4):389-392.
    During Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm, USNS Mercy was one of two American hospital ships deployed to the Persian Gulf. She arrived in the Gulf on 15 September 1990, following a 12,000-mile transit from her homeport of Oakland, California, and remained on station until 18 March 1991, when she passed through the Straits of Hormuz on her return voyage home. During the height of her deployment, Mercy was staffed with nearly 1,200 men and women, including physicians, nurses, dentists, (...)
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  37. added 2019-06-06
    Symposium: A National Committee for the Ethics of Research.M. G. Gelder - 1990 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (3):146.
    A National Committee for the Ethics of Research could consider new questions arising from innovations in research or practice, deal with multi-centre trials, adjudicate when separate local committees give conflicting advice about similar projects, or oversee the work of district committees. The value of each of these functions is assessed and it is concluded that a national committee would be most valuable in providing detailed evaluations of difficult or controversial issues. Though it could offer useful advice about multi-centre trials, local (...)
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  38. added 2019-06-06
    Bringing Philosophy Into the Hospital: Notes of a Philosopher-in-Residence.Fraser Snowden - 1983 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (3):67-81.
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  39. added 2019-06-05
    Asbestos Neglect: Why Asbestos Exposure Deserves Greater Policy Attention.Thomas Douglas & Laura Van den Borre - 2019 - Health Policy 123 (5):516-519.
    While many public health threats are now widely appreciated by the public, the risks from asbestos exposure remain poorly understood, even in high-risk groups. This article makes the case that asbestos exposure is an important, ongoing global health threat, and argues for greater policy efforts to raise awareness of this threat. It also proposes the extension of asbestos bans to developing countries and increased public subsidies for asbestos testing and abatement.
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  40. added 2019-06-05
    Research Ethics Committees: The Ineligibles.Stephen Humphreys - 2015 - Research Ethics 11 (3):142-150.
    Some anomalies in the legislation governing National Research Ethics Service Research Ethics Committee (REC) member categories are discussed. It is suggested that not only may some members be in the wrong category, but that the legislation identifies individuals who are simply ineligible for any form of REC membership.
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  41. added 2019-06-05
    How Bioethics Principles Can Aid Design of Electronic Health Records to Accommodate Patient Granular Control.Eric M. Meslin & Peter H. Schwartz - 2014 - Journal of General Internal Medicine 30 (1):3-6.
    Ethics should guide the design of electronic health records (EHR), and recognized principles of bioethics can play an important role. This approach was adopted recently by a team of informaticists designing and testing a system where patients exert granular control over who views their personal health information. While this method of building ethics in from the start of the design process has significant benefits, questions remain about how useful the application of bioethics principles can be in this process, especially when (...)
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  42. added 2019-06-05
    Capital Report: Whose Advice? Expert Committees Get a Makeover.Kathi E. Hanna - 2002 - Hastings Center Report 32 (6):13.
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  43. added 2019-06-05
    Organizing Ethics. [REVIEW]George J. Agich - 2000 - Hastings Center Report 30 (6):46.
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  44. added 2019-06-05
    The Hospital Ethics Committee Health Care's Moral Conscience or White Elephant?David C. Blake - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (1):6.
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  45. added 2019-06-05
    At Law: Ethics Committees: From Ethical Comfort to Ethical Cover.George J. Annas - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (3):18.
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  46. added 2019-06-05
    Should Hospital Ethics Committees Have a Budget?Joanne E. Morelli - 1990 - HEC Forum 2 (3):203-207.
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  47. added 2019-06-05
    Improving Hospital Ethics Committees: Testing an Educational Model.Richard A. Lusky - 1990 - HEC Forum 2 (3):157-170.
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  48. added 2019-06-05
    Legal Notes: Is There a Place for Lawyers on Ethics Committees? A View From the Inside.Suzanne M. Mitchell & Martha S. Swartz - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (2):32.
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  49. added 2019-06-05
    Self-Education for Hospital Ethics Committees.Kate T. Christensen - 1990 - HEC Forum 1 (6):333-339.
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  50. added 2019-06-05
    1. Hospital Ethics Committees: The Healing Function.Richard Moskowitz - 1990 - HEC Forum 1 (6):309-315.
1 — 50 / 705