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  1. Howard Adelman (2009). Research on the Ethics of War in the Context of Violence in Gaza. Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):93-113.
    The paper first demonstrates the ability to provode objective data and analyses during war and then examines the need for such objective gathering of data and analysis in the context of mass violence and war, specifically in the 2009 Gaza War. That data and analysis is required to assess compliance with just war norms in assessing the conduct of the war, a framework quite distinct from human rights norms that can misapply and deform the application of norms such as proportionality (...)
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  2. Babafemi Akinrinade (2001). International Humanitarian Law and the Conflict in Sierra Leone. Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 15 (2):391-454.
  3. Andrew Altman & Christopher Heath Wellman (2008). From Humanitarian Intervention to Assassination: Human Rights and Political Violence. Ethics 118 (2):228-257.
  4. John Armitage (2003). On Ernst Jünger's 'Total Mobilization': A Re-Evaluation in the Era of the War on Terrorism. Body and Society 9 (4):191-213.
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  5. Etienne Balibar (2008). What's in a War? (Politics as War, War as Politics). Ratio Juris 21 (3):365-386.
    Abstract. This paper combines reflections on the current "state of war" in the Middle East with an epistemological discussion of the meaning and implications of the category "war" itself, in order to dissipate the confusions arising from the idea of a "War on Terror." The first part illustrates the insufficiency of the ideal type involved in dichotomies which are implicit in the naming and classifications of wars. They point nevertheless to a deeper problem which concerns the antinomic character of a (...)
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  6. Bar On Bat-Ami (2008). The Opposition of Politics and War. Hypatia 23 (2):141-154.
    At stake for this essay is the distinction between politics and war and the extent to which politics can survive war. Gender analysis reveals how high these stakes are by revealing the complexity of militarism. It also reveals the impossibility of gender identity as foundation for a more robust politics with respect to war. Instead, a non-ideal normative differentiation among kinds of violence is affirmed as that which politically cannot not be wanted.
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  7. Spencer Baraki (2011). The New Humanitarian Precedent. The Lyceum 1 (1):5-21.
    Explores the history and background of "humanitarian" intervention with regards to Libya.
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  8. Tarak Barkawi (2002). Organising Violence in World Politics: A Review Essay. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 5 (1):101-120.
  9. Saba Bazargan (2013). Peter A. French, War and Moral Dissonance. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (1):116-119.
  10. Daniel M. Bell Jr (1997). The Violence of Love: Latin American Liberationists in Defense of the Tradition of Revolutionary Violence.”. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 8 (1):17-36.
  11. Alex J. Bellamy (2006). Whither the Responsibility to Protect? Humanitarian Intervention and the 2005 World Summit. Ethics and International Affairs 20 (2):143–169.
    At the 2005 World Summit, the world's leaders committed themselves to the "responsibility to protect", recognizing both that all states have a responsibility to protect their citizens from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity and that the UN should help states to discharge this responsibility using either peaceful means or enforcement action. This declaration ostensibly marks an important milestone in the relationship between sovereignty and human rights but its critics argue that it will make little difference in (...)
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  12. Alex J. Bellamy (2005). Responsibility to Protect or Trojan Horse? The Crisis in Darfur and Humanitarian Intervention After Iraq. Ethics and International Affairs 19 (2):31–54.
    What does the world's engagement with the unfolding crisis in Darfur tell us about the impact of the Iraq war on the norm of humanitarian intervention? Is a global consensus about a "responsibility to protect" more or less likely? There are at least three potential answers to these questions. Some argue that the merging of strategic interests and humanitarian goods amplified by the intervention in Afghanistan makes it more likely that the world's most powerful states will act to prevent or (...)
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  13. Alex J. Bellamy (2004). Motives, Outcomes, Intent and the Legitimacy of Humanitarian Intervention. Journal of Military Ethics 3 (3):216-232.
    During the 1990s, international society increasingly recognised that states who abuse their citizens in the most egregious ways ought to lose their sovereign inviolability and be subject to humanitarian intervention. The emergence of this norm has given renewed significance to the debate concerning what it is about humanitarian intervention that makes it legitimate. The most popular view is that it is humanitarian motivations that legitimise intervention. Others insist that humanitarian outcomes are more important that an actor's motivations, pointing for instance (...)
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  14. Bobby Benedicto (2013). Reimagining the Intervention Narrative: Complicity, Globalization, and Humanitarian Discourse. Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 9 (1):105-117.
  15. Ian Birchall (1999). On Humanitarian Bombing. Radical Philosophy 97.
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  16. Luc Boltanski (2000). The Legitimacy of Humanitarian Actions and Their Media Representation: The Case of France. Ethical Perspectives 7 (1):3-16.
    The question of humanitarian action appeared in France in the public arena at the beginning of the 1990s, almost twenty years after the creation of `Médecins sans frontières' by Bernard Kouchner and Xavier Emmanuelli. The humanitarian debate in France developed in a political context marked by two essential features: on the one hand, the bureaucratization of humanitarian actions with its own secretary of state, an office occupied by Bernard Kouchner between 1988 and 1993 and, on the other hand, the war (...)
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  17. Vihren Bouzov (2015). Philosophy of Global Security. In Ioan-Alexandru Tofan Mihai-Dan Chiţoiu (ed.), Proceedings of the International Conference “Humanities and Social Sciences Today. Classical and Contemporary Issues” – Philosophy and Other Humanities. pp. 43-51.
    We are living in an imbalanced and insecure world. It is torn by violent conflicts on a global scale: between the West and the East, between rich and poor countries, between Christianity and Islam, between the Great Forces and naughty countries, between a global capitalist elite and workers and between the global democratic community and global terrorism. An optimistic thesis will be grounded asserting that varied cultures and civilizations can solve all existing problems and contradictions peacefully and can carry out (...)
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  18. Joseph Boyle (2006). Traditional Just War Theory and Humanitarian Intervention. In Terry Nardin & Melissa Williams (eds.), Humanitarian Intervention. New York University Press. pp. 31--38.
  19. Kelly Bradberry-Guest (2011). Effects of Computer-Based Intervention on Higher Order Thinking Skills and Implications for Response to Intervention. Dissertation, Walden University
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  20. Marie Breen-Smyth (ed.) (forthcoming). Ashgate Companion to Political Violence. Ashgate.
  21. Torkel Brekke (2004). Wielding the Rod of Punishment – War and Violence in the Political Science of Kautilya. Journal of Military Ethics 3 (1):40-52.
    This article presents Kautilya, the most important thinker in the tradition of statecraft in India. Kautilya has influenced ideas of war and violence in much of South- and Southeast Asia and he is of great importance for a comparative understanding of the ethics of war. The violence inflicted by the king on internal and external enemies is pivotal for the maintenance of an ordered society, according to Kautilya. Prudence and treason are hallmarks of Kautilya's world. The article shows that this (...)
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  22. Natalie Brender (2001). Political Care and Humanitarian Response. In Peggy DesAutels & JoAnne Waugh (eds.), Feminists Doing Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield.
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  23. Reginald Bretnor (1992). Of Force and Violence and Other Imponderables: Essays on War, Politics, and Government. Borgo Press.
  24. Gillian Brock (2006). Humanitarian Intervention: Closing the Gap Between Theory and Practice. Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (3):277–291.
  25. Allen Buchanan (2003). Secession, State Breakdown, and Humanitarian Intervention. In Dean Chatterjee & Donald Scheid (eds.), Ethics and Foreign Intervention. Cambridge University Press. pp. 189--211.
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  26. A. J. C. (2008). War and Intervention. In Catriona McKinnon (ed.), Issues in Political Theory. Oxford University Press.
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  27. Nicole Gastineau Campos & Paul Farmer (2003). Partners: Discernment and Humanitarian Efforts in Settings of Violence. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):506-515.
  28. A. Canavero (2009). ""Popes and Peace: The" Just War" Doctrine and Humanitarian Intervention in the 20th Century. In Jost Dülffer & Robert Frank (eds.), Peace, War and Gender From Antiquity to the Present: Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Klartext. pp. 97--113.
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  29. A. L. Caplan & D. R. Curry (2015). Refugees, Humanitarian Aid and the Right to Decline Vaccinations. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (3):276-277.
  30. Richard Caplan (2000). Humanitarian Intervention: Which Way Forward? Ethics and International Affairs 14 (1):23–38.
    NATO's member states put aside their concerns for national sovereignty in favor of humanitarian considerations, acting without UN authorization. European states are rethinking historic prohibitions against humanitarian intervention after Kosovo.
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  31. Simon Chesterman (2003). Humanitarian Intervention and Afghanistan. In Jennifer M. Welsh (ed.), Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter argues that humanitarian intervention in Afghanistan provided much needed legitimacy to US military actions which were undertaken for partly humanitarian reasons. Operation Enduring Freedom, like most incidents claimed as humanitarian intervention, displayed a range of intentions — some genuine, some asserted, others claimed after the fact. It showed a recognition on the part of the acting state that such intervention cannot be purely military in character to be effective.
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  32. Andrew Chitty (1999). On Humanitarian Bombing. Radical Philosophy 96.
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  33. Noam Chomsky, Humanitarian Intervention.
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  34. Robert Christian (2013). Catholic Social Teaching, Humanitarian Intervention, and the Three Traditions. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 10 (1):179-202.
  35. Ian Clark (1988). Waging War: A Philosophical Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    What is war, and how should it be waged? Are there restraints on its conduct? What can philosophers contribute to the study of warfare? Arguing that the practice of war requires a sound philosophical understanding, Ian Clark writes a fascinating synthesis of the philosophy, history, political theory, and contemporary strategy of warfare. Examining the traditional doctrines of the "just" and the "limited" war with fresh insight, Clark also addresses the applicability of these ideas to the modern issues of war crimes, (...)
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  36. A. J. Coates (1997). The Ethics of War. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by St. Martin's Press.
    Drawing on examples from the history of warfare from the crusades to the present day, "The ethics of war" explores the limits and possibilities of the moral regulation of war. While resisting the commonly held view that 'war is hell', A.J. Coates focuses on the tensions which exist between war and morality. The argument is conducted from a just war standpoint, though the moral ambiguity and mixed record of that tradition is acknowledge and the dangers which an exaggerated view of (...)
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  37. Raphael Cohen-Almagor (1991). Foundations of Violence, Terror and War in the Writings of Marx, Engels, and Lenin. Terrorism and Political Violence 3 (2).
    The aims of this essay are (A) to examine the extent to which Marx, Engels and Lenin believed in revolution by peaceful means and what was their attitude towards the phenomenon of war, and (B) to reflect on the different interpretations of their writings, discerning between three schools of thought. It is argued that Marx and Engels considered violence only as an instrument of secondary importance and desirable insofar as there is no other alternative to change the system. It is (...)
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  38. Marjorie Cohn (2002). Nato Bombing of Kosovo: Humanitarian Intervention or Crime Against Humanity? International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 15 (1):79-106.
    For 78 days in 1999, NATO forces led by theUnited States bombed Yugoslavia, killinghundreds of its civilians and devastating itsinfrastructure. NATO spokesmen justified thebombardment as ``humanitarian intervention''aimed at halting President Slobodan Milosevic's``ethnic cleansing'' of non-Serbs in Yugoslavia. This essay deconstructs NATO's rationalizationsand analyzes other more sinister motives forthe bombing. By containing Yugoslavia, andmaintaining a permanent presence in Kosovo, theUnited States seeks to ensure its access toCaspian Sea oil, and to maintain economichegemony over Europe. U.S. activities inother countries, such as Turkey, (...)
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  39. Christopher Coker (2008). Ethics and War in the 21st Century. Routledge.
    Preface 1. Fighting Terrorism 1:1. A new Discourse on War? 1:2. Richard Rorty and the Ethics of War 2. Etiquettes of Atrocity 2:1. Etiquettes of Atrocity 2:2. Discourses on War 2:3. Keeping the discourse: the United States and Vietnam 2.4. Carl Schmitt and the theory of the Partisan 3. Changing the Discourse 3:1 Germany and the Eastern Front 1941-5 3:2 France and Algeria 1955-8 3:3 Israel and the Intifada 3:4 Conclusion 4. A New Discourse? 4:1. The War on Terror -- (...)
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  40. Martin L. Cook (2000). "Immaculate War": Constraints on Humanitarian Intervention. Ethics and International Affairs 14 (1):55–65.
    Although military personnel are required to follow all legal orders, morally the traditional contract between soldier and state rests on shared assumptions about the purposes for which national militaries will and will not be used.
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  41. Ernest C. Cripps (1943). William Allen. Quaker, Humanitarian, Scientist. Hibbert Journal 42:353.
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  42. Saad Dabbous & Jaan Islam (2016). An Analysis of the Historical Application of Jihad and Implications on the Clash of Civilizations. International Journal of Political Theory 1 (1):70-86.
    This paper is a part-review analysis into the modern conception of both the word and Jihād and the violent nature of Islam. In order to develop an overarching modern theory of Jihād, current opinions and general argumtations in the literature are examined. Two theories have emerged in defining Islam and the role of Jihād in Islam. The first is that of the so-called Muslim apologists; scholars who define Jihād as mainly a personal struggle, and whose physical application (warfare) is only (...)
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  43. Fred Dallmayr (2011). Befriending the Stranger: Beyond the Global Politics of Fear. Journal of International Political Theory 7 (1):1-15.
    The process of globalisation and the so-called war on terror are two prominent features marking our present age. While the process of globalisation promises the prospect of moving beyond or across borders, the war on terror marks a return to fences, check-points, and dividing walls. Terror war is a global politics of fear, a politics conducted under the rigid border control between ‘us’ and ‘them’. This paper examines the ominous development of fear in world politics from a number of angles. (...)
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  44. Alex Danchev, The Hospitality of War.
    In considering some of the issues raised by the troubling and troublesome thesis of the barbarization of warfare, this review article reflects briefly on civilization and barbarism on the battlefield, and in the imagination, calling in aid an unholy alliance of Joseph Conrad, Norbert Elias, Basil Liddell Hart among others, and pitting the idea of a civilizing process against a barbarizing one. From 2003 to 2006 UN Secretary General Kofi Annan pursued an agenda that went far beyond budget, personnel and (...)
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  45. John J. Davenport (2011). Just War Theory, Humanitarian Intervention, and the Need for a Democratic Federation. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):493-555.
    The primary purpose of government is to secure public goods that cannot be achieved by free markets. The Coordination Principle tells us to consolidate sovereign power in a single institution to overcome collective action problems that otherwise prevent secure provision of the relevant public goods. There are several public goods that require such coordination at the global level, chief among them being basic human rights. The claim that human rights require global coordination is supported in three main steps. First, I (...)
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  46. Nicolas de Torrenté (2013). The Relevance and Effectiveness of Humanitarian Aid: Reflections About the Relationship Between Providers and Recipients. Social Research: An International Quarterly 80 (2):607-634.
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  47. ĖV Demenchonok (ed.) (2009). Between Global Violence and the Ethics of Peace: Philosophical Perspectives. Wiley.
  48. Dan Demetriou (2013). Honor War Theory: Romance or Reality? Philosophical Papers 42 (3):285 - 313.
    Just War Theory (JWT) replaced an older "warrior code," an approach to war that remains poorly understood and dismissively treated in the philosophical literature. This paper builds on recent work on honor to address these deficiencies. By providing a clear, systematic exposition of "Honor War Theory" (HWT), we can make sense of paradigm instances of warrior psychology and behavior, and understand the warrior code as the martial expression of a broader honor-based ethos that conceives of obligation in terms of fair (...)
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  49. F. Demont-Biaggi (ed.) (forthcoming). The Nature of Peace & the Morality of Armed Conflict. Palgrave.
  50. Lawrence Dennis (1980). The Dynamics of War and Revolution. Institute for Historical Review.
1 — 50 / 172