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  1. Aristidis Arageorgis, John Earman & Laura Ruetsche (2002). Weyling the Time Away: The Non-Unitary Implementability of Quantum Field Dynamics on Curved Spacetime. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (2):151-184.
    The simplest case of quantum field theory on curved spacetime—that of the Klein–Gordon field on a globally hyperbolic spacetime—reveals a dilemma: In generic circumstances, either there is no dynamics for this quantum field, or else there is a dynamics that is not unitarily implementable. We do not try to resolve the dilemma here, but endeavour to spell out the consequences of seizing one or the other horn of the dilemma.
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  2. Howard Barnum (2003). Quantum Information Processing, Operational Quantum Logic, Convexity, and the Foundations of Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 34 (3):343-379.
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  3. Jeffrey Barrett (2000). Interpreting the Quantum WorldJeffrey Bub. Isis 91 (1):188-189.
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  4. Gal BenPorat & Sam Schweber (2015). Quantum Chemistry and the Quantum Revolution. In Ana Simões, Jürgen Renn & Theodore Arabatzis (eds.), Relocating the History of Science. Springer Verlag.
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  5. Jeffrey Bub (2004). Why the Quantum? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 35 (2):241-266.
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  6. R. Bulla (2006). Dynamical Mean-Field Theory: From Quantum Impurity Physics to Lattice Problems. Philosophical Magazine 86 (13-14):1877-1889.
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  7. P. Busch (2002). Classical Versus Quantum Ontology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (3):517-539.
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  8. Jeremy Butterfield & Nazim Bouatta, Renormalization for Philosophers.
    We have two aims. The main one is to expound the idea of renormalization in quantum field theory, with no technical prerequisites. Our motivation is that renormalization is undoubtedly one of the great ideas—and great successes--of twentieth-century physics. Also it has strongly influenced in diverse ways, how physicists conceive of physical theories. So it is of considerable philosophical interest. Second, we will briefly relate renormalization to Ernest Nagel's account of inter-theoretic relations, especially reduction. One theme will be a contrast between (...)
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  9. Armond Duwell (2003). The Physics of Quantum Information: Quantum Cryptography, Quantum Teleportation, Quantum Computation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 34 (2):331-334.
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  10. Charles P. Enz (1994). Hamiltonian Description and Quantization of Dissipative Systems. Foundations of Physics 24 (9):1281-1292.
    Dissipative systems are described by a Hamiltonian, combined with a “dynamical matrix” which generalizes the simplectic form of the equations of motion. Criteria for dissipation are given and the examples of a particle with friction and of the Lotka-Volterra model are presented. Quantization is first introduced by translating generalized Poisson brackets into commutators and anticommutators. Then a generalized Schrödinger equation expressed by a dynamical matrix is constructed and discussed.
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  11. A. B. Evans (1991). Klein's Paradox in a Four-Space Formulation of Dirac's Equation. Foundations of Physics 21 (6):633-647.
    A 4-space formulation of Dirac's equation gives results formally identical to those of the usual Klein paradox. However, some extra physical detail can be inferred, and this suggests that the most extreme case involves pair production within the potential barrier.
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  12. John R. Fanchi & Weldon J. Wilson (1983). Relativistic Many-Body Systems: Evolution-Parameter Formalism. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 13 (6):571-605.
    The complexity of the field theoretic methods used for analyzing relativistic bound state problems has forced researchers to look for simpler computational methods. Simpler methods such as the relativistic harmonic oscillator method employed in the description of extended hadrons have been investigated. They are considered phenomenological, however, because they lack a theoretical basis. A probabilistic basis for these methods is presented here in terms of the four-space formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics (FSF). The single-particle FSF is reviewed and its physical (...)
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  13. Harvey Fields, The Projection Problem and the Symmetries of Physics: On the Possibility of the Scientific Realist Case.
    Dr Harvey Fields, of Czech origin, trained in physics in the US and published several papers on plasma physics in the 1960s. In the late 1970s, he obtained a PhD in history and philosophy of science at Tel Aviv University. After moving to the UK, Dr Fields was Karl Popper's research assistant from 1979 to 1982. In the decade prior to his sudden death in July 2006, he was a regular and active participant at the weekly Philosophy of Physics research (...)
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  14. Thomas Filk & Hartmann Römer (2011). Generalized Quantum Theory: Overview and Latest Developments. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 21 (2):211-220.
    The main formal structures of generalized quantum theory are summarized. Recent progress has sharpened some of the concepts, in particular the notion of an observable, the action of an observable on states (putting more emphasis on the role of proposition observables), and the concept of generalized entanglement. Furthermore, the active role of the observer in the structure of observables and the partitioning of systems is emphasized.
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  15. Gordon N. Fleming (2000). Reeh-Schlieder Meets Newton-Wigner. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):515.
    The Reeh-Schlieder theorem asserts the vacuum and certain other states to be spacelike superentangled relative to local fields. This motivates an inquiry into the physical status of various concepts of localization. It is argued that a covariant generalization of Newton-Wigner localization is a physically illuminating concept. When analyzed in terms of nonlocally covariant quantum fields, creating and annihilating quanta in Newton-Wigner localized states, the vacuum is seen to not possess the spacelike superentanglement that the Reeh-Schlieder theorem displays relative to local (...)
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  16. Robert G. Flower, Conference on the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics.
    Enormous and significant progress has been made in the important areas of entanglement, quantum computing and harnessing energy from the vacuum, which includes a sound theoretical basis, using the Einstein-Sachs theories to develop an anti-symmetric general relativity (AGR) approach to a higher topology O(3) electrodynamics. These developments also lead to the application of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the Yang-Mills theory to the higher topology O(3) electrodynamics, as well as a deeper understanding and appreciation of these effects and their impact on (...)
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  17. Malcolm Forster, Percolation: An Easy Example of Renormalization.
    Kenneth Wilson won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1982 for applying renormalization group, which he learnt from quantum field theory (QFT), to problems in statistical physics—the induced magnetization of materials (ferromagnetism) and the evaporation and condensation of fluids (phase transitions). See Wilson (1983). The renormalization group got its name from its early applications in QFT. There, it appeared to be a rather ad hoc method of subtracting away unwanted infinities. The further allegation was that the procedure is so horrendously (...)
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  18. D. J. Foulis & C. H. Randall (1974). Empirical Logic and Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 29 (1-4):81 - 111.
  19. D. Fraser (2004). Meinard Kuhlmann, Holger Lyre and Andrew Wayne, Editors, Ontological Aspects of Quantum Field Theory, World Scientific Publishing, London (2002) ISBN 981-238-182-1 (376 Pp., US $98, £ 73). [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 35 (4):721-723.
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  20. Olival Freire (2009). Quantum Dissidents: Research on the Foundations of Quantum Theory Circa 1970. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 40 (4):280-289.
  21. H. M. Fried (2000). New Thoughts About an Old Eikonal Problem. Foundations of Physics 30 (4):529-532.
    Two different methods of approach, currently under investigation, are suggested for calculating the eikonal function corresponding to quark-quark scattering at very high energies and small momentum transfers. These methods illustrate the realistic, dynamical complexities inherent in QCD scattering problems.
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  22. Simon Friederich (2013). Pristinism Under Pressure: Ruetsche on the Interpretation of Quantum Theories. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 78 (5):1205-1212.
    Review of Laura Ruetsche's book "Interpreting Quantum Theories".
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  23. Michael Friedman & Clark Glymour (1972). If Quanta Had Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 1 (1):16 - 28.
  24. G. N. Georgacarakos (1980). Equationally Definable Implication Algebras for Orthomodular Lattices. Studia Logica 39 (1):5 - 18.
    The fact that it is possible to define three different material conditionals in orthomodular lattices suggests that there exist three different orthomodular logics whose conditionals are material conditionals and whose models are orthomodular lattices. The purpose of this paper is to provide equationally definable implication algebras for each of these material conditionals.
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  25. Todd Gilmore Jr & James Park (1979). Superselection Rules in Quantum Theory: Part I. A New Proposal for State Restriction Violation. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 9 (7-8):537-556.
    It is argued that preparation of a quantum state characterized by density operator ρ not commuting with a superselection operatorQ does not by itself constitute an instance of superselection rule violation. It would, however, be an instance of state restriction violation. It is held that superselection rule violation is only possible with simultaneous observable and state restriction violations. It is shown that it is a priori conceivable to subdivide an ensemble whose ρ satisfies[ρ, Q] = 0 into subensembles whose density (...)
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  26. Todd Gilmore Jr & James L. Park (1979). Superselection Rules in Quantum Theory: Part II. Subensemble Selection. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 9 (9-10):739-749.
    A dynamical analysis of standard procedures for subensemble selection is used to show that the state restriction violation proposal in Part I of the paper cannot be realized by employing familiar correlation schemes. However, it is shown that measurement of an observable not commuting with the superselection operator is possible, a violation of the observable restrictions. This is interpreted as supporting the position that each of these restrictions is sufficient but not necessary for the superselection rule. The results do constitute (...)
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  27. StanisŁaw Goldstein, Andrzej Łuczak & Ivan F. Wilde (1999). Independence in Operator Algebras. Foundations of Physics 29 (1):79-89.
    Various notions of independence of observables have been proposed within the algebraic framework of quantum field theory. We discuss relationships between these and the recently introduced notion of logical independence in a general operator-algebraic context. We show that C*-independence implies an analogue of classical independence.
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  28. I. J. Good (1959). Lattice Structure of Space-Time. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 9 (36):317-319.
  29. O. W. Greenberg (2006). Why is Mathcal{CPT} Fundamental? Foundations of Physics 36 (10):1535-1553.
    Lüders and Pauli proved the $\mathcal{CPT}$ theorem based on Lagrangian quantum field theory almost half a century ago. Jost gave a more general proof based on “axiomatic” field theory nearly as long ago. The axiomatic point of view has two advantages over the Lagrangian one. First, the axiomatic point of view makes clear why $\mathcal{CPT}$ is fundamental—because it is intimately related to Lorentz invariance. Secondly, the axiomatic proof gives a simple way to calculate the $\mathcal{CPT}$ transform of any relativistic field (...)
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  30. O. W. Greenberg (2004). Book Review: Quantum Field Theory in a Nutshell. By A. Zee, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 2003, ISBN: 0-691-01019-6, Xv+518 Pp. $49.50 (Hardcover). [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 34 (1):187-188.
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  31. Daniel Greenberger (2001). Book Review: Conceptual Foundations of Quantum Physics: An Overview From Modern Perspectives. By Dipankar Home. Plenum Publishing Corporation, New York, New York, 1997, Xvii + 386 Pp., $167.00 (Hardcover). ISBN 0-306-45660-5. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 31 (5):855-857.
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  32. Daniel Greenberger (2001). Book Review: New Developments on Fundamental Problems in Quantum Physics. By Miguel Ferrero and Alwyn van der Merwe, Eds. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1997. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 31 (3):557-559.
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  33. Neal Grossman (1997). Metaphysical Implications of the Quantum Theory. Synthese 35 (1):79 - 97.
  34. Stanley Gudder (1994). Toward a Rigorous Quantum Field Theory. Foundations of Physics 24 (9):1205-1225.
    This paper outlines a framework that may provide a mathematically rigorous quantum field theory. The framework relies upon the methods of nonstandard analysis. A theory of nonstandard inner product spaces and operators on these spaces is first developed. This theory is then applied to construct nonstandard Fock spaces which extend the standard Fock spaces. Then a rigorous framework for the field operators of quantum field theory is presented. The results are illustrated for the case of Klein-Gordon fields.
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  35. N. Hall (1999). Review. The Quantum Challenge. G Greenstein, AG Zajonc. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (2):313-315.
  36. with Hans Halvorson (2004). No Place for Particles in Relativistic Quantum Theories? In Jeremy Butterfield & Hans Halvorson (eds.), Quantum Entanglements: Selected Papers. Clarendon Press.
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  37. Kaj Börge Hansen (2010). Conceptual Foundations of Operational Set Theory. Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 45:29-50.
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  38. Frank Hättich (2004). Quantum Processes: A Whiteheadian Interpretation of Quantum Field Theory. Agenda.
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  39. Daniel M. Hausman (1999). Lessons From Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 121 (1-2):79-92.
  40. Richard Healey (1998). The Metaphysics of Emptiness "La Métaphysique de la Vacuité". In E. Gunzig & S. Diner (eds.), Le Vide: Univers du Tout Et du Rien, Eds. E. Gunzig and S. Diner, Revue de L’Université de Bruxelles. Éditions Complexe, 1998. Revue de L’Université de Bruxelles. Éditions Complexe,.
    Is there a vacuum in nature? This is a question which preoccupied natural philosophers for millennia. Great thinkers including Democritus and Newton maintained the existence of a vacuum, while Aristotle, Descartes and Leibniz argued strongly that there was not, and perhaps could not be, any such thing. A casual glance at the literature of contemporary physics may leave the impression that scientific progress has produced a definitive positive answer, so that the philosophers' debates are now of only historical interest. Not (...)
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  41. G. Hon (2002). The Odd Quantum. By Sam Treiman. The European Legacy 7 (4):518-519.
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  42. C. A. Hooker (1991). Book Review:Philosophical Foundations of Quantum Field Theory Harvey R. Brown, Rom Harre. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 58 (2):324-.
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  43. Horace (2009). Quantum Distet. Arion 16 (3).
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  44. L. P. Horwitz & N. Shnerb (1998). Second Quantization of the Stueckelberg Relativistic Quantum Theory and Associated Gauge Fields. Foundations of Physics 28 (10):1509-1519.
    The gauge compensation fields induced by the differential operators of the Stueckelberg-Schrödinger equation are discussed, as well as the relation between these fields and the standard Maxwell fields; An action is constructed and the second quantization of the fields carried out using a constraint procedure. The properties of the second quantized matter fields are discussed.
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  45. Huping Hu & Maoxin Wu, Thinking Outside the Box II: The Origin, Implications and Applications of Gravity and its Role in Consciousness.
    Although theories and speculations abound, there is no consensus on the origin or cause of gravity. Presumably, this status of affair is due to the lack of any experimental guidance. In this paper, we will discuss its ontological origin, implications and potential applications by thinking outside the mainstream notions of general relativity and quantum gravity. We argue that gravity originates from the primordial spin processes in non-spatial and non-temporal pre-spacetime, is the manifestation of quantum entanglement, and implies genuine instantaneous interconnectedness (...)
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  46. Nick Huggett (1995). The Philosophy of Fields and Particles in Classical and Quantum Mechanics, Including the Problem of Renormalisation. Dissertation, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick
    This work first explicates the philosophy of classical and quantum fields and particles. I am interested in determining how science can have a metaphysical dimension, and then with the claim that the quantum revolution has an important metaphysical component. I argue that the metaphysical implications of a theory are properties of its models, as classical mechanics determines properties of atomic diversity and temporal continuity with its representations of distinct, continuous trajectories. ;It is often suggested that classical statistical physics requires that (...)
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  47. Nick Huggett (1994). What Are Quanta, and Why Does It Matter? PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:69 - 76.
    I criticize a certain view of the 'quanta' of quantum mechanics that sees them as fundamentally non-atomistic and fundamentally significant for our understanding of quantum fields. In particular, I have in mind work by Redhead and Teller (1991, 1992 and Teller 1990). I prove that classical particles do not have the rather strong flavour of identity often associated with them; permuting positions and momenta does not produce distinct states. I show that even the label free excitation formalism is compatible with (...)
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  48. Nick Huggett & Craig Callender (2001). Why Quantize Gravity (or Any Other Field for That Matter)? Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S382-.
    The quantum gravity program seeks a theory that handles quantum matter fields and gravity consistently. But is such a theory really required and must it involve quantizing the gravitational field? We give reasons for a positive answer to the first question, but dispute a widespread contention that it is inconsistent for the gravitational field to be classical while matter is quantum. In particular, we show how a popular argument (Eppley and Hannah 1997) falls short of a no-go theorem, and discuss (...)
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  49. R. I. G. Hughes (1982). The Logic of Experimental Questions. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:243 - 256.
    The pair (A, Δ ), where A is a physical quantity (an observable) and Δ a subset of the reals, may be called an 'experimental question'. The set Q of experimental questions is, in classical mechanics, a Boolean algebra, and in quantum mechanics an orthomodular lattice (and also a transitive partial Boolean algebra). The question is raised: can we specify a priori what algebraic structure Q must have in any theory whatsoever? Several proposals suggesting that Q must be a lattice (...)
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  50. Peter Jedlicka (2014). Quantum Stochasticity and Neurodeterminism. In Uwe Meixner & Antonella Corradini (eds.), Quantum Physics Meets the Philosophy of Mind: New Essays on the Mind-Body Relation in Quantum-Theoretical Perspective. De Gruyter. pp. 183-198.
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