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  1. The Racialization of Killer Whales: An Application of Gene-Culture Coevolutionary Theory.David Golding - forthcoming - Perspectives on Science:1-61.
    An expanding body of research aims to identify culture in cetaceans, often positing killer whales as an exemplar species. To this end, gene-culture coevolutionary theory provides a conceptual language with which whales are discussed in raciological terms. It renders killer whale ecotypes as discrete cultures that are intrinsically xenophobic and evolutionarily divergent. Such research on whale culture intends to substantiate theories of divergent natural selection between human cultures as well. This effort furthers the essentialism, simultaneously biological and cultural, that has (...)
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  2. "Go Back to Where You Came From!" Racism, Xenophobia, and White Nationalism.José Jorge Mendoza - 2023 - American Philosophical Quarterly 60 (4):397-410.
    There are two competing ways of understanding nefarious expressions of nationalism in countries like the U.S., either as xenophobia or racism. In this essay, I offer a way of capturing what is attractive in both accounts: a way of thinking about the xenophobia of U.S. nationalism that does not miss or minimize the role that race plays in condemning such expressions, but at the same time does not risk overextending the definition of racism. To do this, the essay makes a (...)
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  3. Doth He Protest Too Much? Thoughts on Matthew’s Black Devaluation Thesis.Michael S. Merry - 2023 - Dialogue 62 (1):69-75.
  4. Ship fever, confinement, and the racialization of disease.Christopher M. Blakley - 2022 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 95 (C):96-103.
  5. Health Privacy, Racialization, and the Causal Potential of Legal Regulations.Joanna Malinowska & Bartek Chomanski - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (7):76-78.
    Pyrrho and colleagues (2022) argue that the loss of health privacy can damage democratic values by increasing social polarization, removing individual choice, and limiting self-determination. As a remedy, the authors propose a data-regulation regime that prohibits companies from using such data for discriminatory purposes. Our commentary addresses three issues. First, we point out an additional problematic dimension of excessive health privacy loss, namely, the potential racialization of groups and individuals that it may likely contribute to. Second, we note that, in (...)
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  6. Que doivent faire les blancs ?Jules Salomone - 2022 - In “Qualifier le racisme : controverses et reconnaissance du fait racial,” special issue, Mouvements. Paris, France: pp. 189-202.
  7. Children of the narod : early Soviet children's books' racialization of childhood.Marie Gasper-Hulvat - 2021 - In Marsha Morton & Barbara Larson (eds.), Constructing race on the borders of Europe: ethnography, anthropology, and visual culture, 1850-1930. New York: Bloomsbury Visual Arts.
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  8. Necropolitical Screens: Digital Image, Propriety, Racialization.Marina Gržinić - 2021 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 30 (61-62):98-106.
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  9. Rethinking Rachel Doležal and Transracial Theory.Molly Littlewood McKibbin - 2021 - Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan.
    Using real-life examples, this book asks readers to reflect on how we—as an academic community—think and talk about race and racial identity in twenty-first century America. One of these examples, Rachel Doležal, provides a springboard for an examination of the state of our discourse around changeable racial identity and the potential for “transracialism.” An analysis of how we are theorizing transracial identity (as opposed to an argument for/against it), this study detects some omissions and problems that are becoming evident as (...)
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  10. Southern Land: Indigeneity, Genocide, and Racialization in Whitened Lineages.Ladelle McWhorter - 2021 - In Shannon Sullivan (ed.), Thinking the US South: contemporary philosophy from Southern perspectives. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press.
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  11. The Gendered Racialization of Asian Women as Villainous Temptresses.Rhacel Salazar Parreñas & Maria Cecilia Hwang - 2021 - Gender and Society 35 (4):567-576.
    What explains white male animus against Asian women? We address this question by examining the murders in Atlanta, GA, which reflect a larger global pattern of violence against what are perceived as hypersexualized Asian women. Dominant discourses on these murders promote either a narrative of racial xenophobia or a stance for or against sex work. Neither discourse adequately accounts for the simultaneous racial and gendered determination of Asian women’s experiences. In this commentary, we provide a racial–gender analysis and underscore how (...)
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  12. Todo cubo branco tem um quê de Casa Grande: racialização, montagem e histórias da arte brasileira | Every white cube has a bit of Casa Grande: racialization, filmic montage and Brazilian art history.Igor Moraes Simões - 2021 - Revista Philia Filosofia, Literatura e Arte 3 (1):314-329.
    O presente texto é resultado de uma palestra proferida no 29º Encontro da Associação Nacional de Pesquisadores em Artes Plásticas (Anpap) em 02 de outubro de 2020, na mesa Desconstruir a Hegemonia nas Artes Brasileiras?. O tom coloquial por vezes adotado no texto reflete a especificidade em que foi produzido. A partir da noção de racialização, o autor discute o caráter racista da história, teoria e crítica da arte brasileira, a centralidade das exposições em seu caráter de montagem na escrita (...)
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  13. Not “Minority” but “Minoritized”.Erik Wingrove-Haugland & Jillian McLeod - 2021 - Teaching Ethics 21 (1):1-11.
    Rather than referring to “minorities,” “members of minority groups” or “underrepresented minorities,” we should refer to such individuals as “minoritized.” Using “minoritized” makes it clear that being minoritized is about power and equity not numbers, connects racial oppression to the oppression of women, and gives us an easy way to conceive of intersectionality as being a minoritized member of a minoritized group. The term “minoritized” reveals the fact that white males and other dominant groups minoritize members of subordinated groups rather (...)
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  14. Is “Race” Modern? Disambiguating the Question.Adam Hochman - 2020 - Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 1:1-19.
    Race theorists have been unable to reach a consensus regarding the basic historical question, “is ‘race’ modern?” I argue that this is partly because the question itself is ambiguous. There is not really one question that race scholars are answering, but at least six. First, is the concept of race modern? Second, is there a modern concept of race that is distinct from earlier race concepts? Third, are “races” themselves modern? Fourth, are racialized groups modern? Fifth, are the means and (...)
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  15. Religious Racial Formation Theory and its Metaphysics.Sameer Yadav - 2020 - In Blake Hereth & Kevin Timpe (eds.), The Lost Sheep in Philosophy of Religion New Perspectives on Disability, Gender, Race, and Animals. New York: Routledge. pp. 365-390.
    While the intersection between race and religion has been an important site for research for the sociology of religion and religious studies (in its descriptive dimensions) as well s theology (in its religiously normative dimensions), neither of these disciplines has incorporated recent work in the analytic philosophy of race. Analytic philosophy of race, for its part, has largely neglected the race/religion intersection, while analytic theologians by and large ignore the theological significance of race altogether. In this paper I am to (...)
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  16. Gentrification and the racialization of space.Tyler J. Zimmer - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism:019145372097273.
    It is not uncommon for activists to use the language of colonization or occupation to describe the social dynamics at work in cities undergoing gentrification. Should these claims be regarded as ou...
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  17. Racialization: A Defense of the Concept.Adam Hochman - 2019 - Ethnic and Racial Studies 42 (8):1245-1262.
    This paper defends the concept of racialization against its critics. As the concept has become increasingly popular, questions about its meaning and value have been raised, and a backlash against its use has occurred. I argue that when “racialization” is properly understood, criticisms of the concept are unsuccessful. I defend a definition of racialization and identify its companion concept, “racialized group.” Racialization is often used as a synonym for “racial formation.” I argue that this is a mistake. Racial formation theory (...)
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  18. Race as Technology: From Posthuman Cyborg to Human Industry.Holly Jones & Nicholaos Jones - 2017 - Ilha Do Desterro 70 (2):39-51.
    Cyborg and prosthetic technologies frame prominent posthumanist approaches to understanding the nature of race. But these frameworks struggle to accommodate the phenomena of racial passing and racial travel, and their posthumanist orientation blurs useful distinctions between racialized humans and their social contexts. We advocate, instead, a humanist approach to race, understanding racial hierarchy as an industrial technology. Our approach accommodates racial passing and travel. It integrates a wide array of research across disciplines. It also helpfully distinguishes among grounds of racialization (...)
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  19. The I in Team: Sports Fandom and the Reproduction of Identity.Erin C. Tarver - 2017 - Chicago, IL, USA: University of Chicago Press.
    There is one sound that will always be loudest in sports. It isn’t the squeak of sneakers or the crunch of helmets; it isn’t the grunts or even the stadium music. It’s the deafening roar of sports fans. For those few among us on the outside, sports fandom—with its war paint and pennants, its pricey cable TV packages and esoteric stats reeled off like code—looks highly irrational, entertainment gone overboard. But as Erin C. Tarver demonstrates in this book, sports fandom (...)
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  20. Illegal: White Supremacy and Immigration Status.Jose Jorge Mendoza - 2016 - In Alex Sager (ed.), The Ethics and Politics of Immigration: Core Issues and Emerging Trends. London, UK: Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 201-220.
    This chapter looks at the history of US citizenship and immigration law and argues that denying admission or citizenship status to certain groups of people is closely correlated to a denial of whiteness. On this account whiteness is not a fixed or natural concept, but instead is a social construction whose composition changes throughout time and place. Understanding whiteness in this way allows one to see how white supremacy is not limited merely to instances of racism or ethnocentrism, but can (...)
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  21. A Phenomenology of Hesitation: Interrupting racializing habits of seeing.Alia Al-Saji - 2014 - In Emily S. Lee (ed.), Living Alterities: Phenomenology, Embodiment, and Race. Albany: State University of New York Press. pp. 133-172.
    This paper asks how perception becomes racializing and seeks the means for its critical interruption. My aim is not only to understand the recalcitrant and limitative temporal structure of racializing habits of seeing, but also to uncover the possibilities within perception for a critical awareness and destabilization of this structure. Reading Henri Bergson and Maurice Merleau-Ponty in dialogue with Frantz Fanon, Iris Marion Young and race-critical feminism, I locate in hesitation the phenomenological moment where habits of seeing can be internally (...)
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  22. Too Late: Racialized Time and the Closure of the Past.Alia Al-Saji - 2013 - Insights 6 (5):1-13.
    In this paper, I explore some of the temporal structures of racialized experience – what I call racialized time. I draw on the Martiniquan philosopher and psychiatrist Frantz Fanon, in particular his book ‘Black Skin, White Masks,’ in order to ask how racism can be understood as a social pathology which, when internalized or ‘epidermalized,’ may result in aberrations of affect, embodiment and agency that are temporally lived. In this regard, I analyze the racialized experience of coming ‘too late’ to (...)
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  23. The racialization of Muslim veils: A philosophical analysis.Alia Al-Saji - 2010 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (8):875-902.
    This article goes behind stereotypes of Muslim veiling to ask after the representational structure underlying these images. I examine the public debate leading to the 2004 French law banning conspicuous religious signs in schools and French colonial attitudes to veiling in Algeria, in conjunction with discourses on the veil that have arisen in other western contexts. My argument is that western perceptions and representations of veiled Muslim women are not simply about Muslim women themselves. Rather than representing Muslim women, these (...)
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  24. The Racialization of White Man's Polygamy.Margaret Denike - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (4):852-874.
    This paper offers a genealogy of anti-polygamy sentiment in North America, elucidating certain racist and nationalist formations that are implicit in the historical valorization and enforcement of heterosexual monogamy. It tracks the white supremacist and heteronormative logic that conditions the widespread disdain toward polygamy, and that renders it fundamentally different from familial configurations that are associated with national identity. Relating political and philosophical doctrines to the archival documentation and insights of contemporary legal and cultural historians of anti-polygamy sentiment, it elucidates (...)
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  25. Changing Race, Changing Sex: The Ethics of Self-Transformation.Cressida J. Heyes - 2006 - Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (2):266-282.
    "Why are there 'transsexuals' but not 'transracials'?" "Why is there an accepted way to change sex, but not to change race?" I have repeatedly heard these questions from theorists puzzled by the phenomenon of transsexuality. Feminist thinkers, in particular, often seem taken aback that in the case of category switching the possibilities appear to be so different. Behind the question is sometimes an implicit concern: Does not the (hypothetical or real) example of individual “transracialism” seem politically troubling? And, if it (...)
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  26. Latino/as, asian americans, and the black–white binary.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2003 - The Journal of Ethics 7 (1):5-27.
    This paper aims to contribute toward coalitionbuilding by showing that, even if we try tobuild coalition around what might look like ourmost obvious common concern – reducing racism –the dominant discourse of racial politics inthe United States inhibits an understanding ofhow racism operates vis-à-vis Latino/as andAsian Americans, and thus proves more of anobstacle to coalition building than an aid. Theblack/white paradigm, which operates to governracial classifications and racial politics inthe U.S., takes race in the U.S. to consist ofonly two racial (...)
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  27. African-american existential philosophy.Lewis R. Gordon - 2003 - In Tommy Lee Lott & John P. Pittman (eds.), A Companion to African-American Philosophy. Blackwell.
  28. Ape to Apollo: aesthetics and the idea of race in the 18th century.David Bindman - 2002 - Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press.
    Ape to Apollo is the first book to follow the development in the eighteenth century of the idea of race as it shaped and was shaped by the idea of aesthetics.
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  29. "I'm Not a Racist, But...".Lawrence Blum - 2002 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    Media, politicians, and individuals often use the term "racism" casually and inaccurately, threatening to strip the concept of its meaning and moral force, argues Blum in "'I'm Not a Racist, But...': The Moral Quandary of Race". Not all racial incidents are racist incidents. Blum asserts that only "certain especially serious moral failings and violations" merit the designation "racism." Discussing various scholarly perspectives on the construction of racial categories, Blum calls for a balance between "ridding ourselves of the myth of race" (...)
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  30. Race, colour and the process of racialization: new perspectives from group analysis, psychoanalysis, and sociology.Farhad Dalal - 2002 - New York: Brunner-Routledge.
    Farhad Dalal argues that people differentiate between races in order to make a distinction between the "haves" and "must-not-haves", and that this process is cognitive, emotional and political rather than biological. Examining the subject over the past thousand years, Race, Colour and the Process of Racialisation covers theories of racism and a general theory of difference based on the works of Fanon, Elias, Matte-Blanco and Foulkes, as well as application of this theory to race and racism. Farhad Dalal concludes that (...)
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  31. Is being Hispanic an identity? Reflections on J. J. E. Gracia’s account.Jorge Garcia - 2001 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (2):29-43.
  32. Comment on J. J. E. Gracia’s Hispanic/latino Identity.Robert Gooding-Williams - 2001 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (2):3-10.
  33. Jewish Locations: Traversing Racialized Landscapes.Lisa Tessman & Bat-Ami Bar On (eds.) - 2001 - Rowman & Littlefield.
    This volume brings together essays that reflect on ontological and moral dilemmas regarding Jewish identity and race. The reflections offered here take place in the context of post-Holocaust transformations and pay special attention to the double processes of the deracialization of Jews qua Jews and the recasting of Jews both in reracialized and in other terms. As a result, the essays bring together and create intersections between Jewish studies and critical theories of race and help stretch the limits of as (...)
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  34. Locating Traitorous Identities: Toward a View of Privilege-Cognizant White Character.Alison Bailey - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (3):27 - 42.
    I address the problem of how to locate "traitorous" subjects, or those who belong to dominant groups yet resist the usual assumptions and practices of those groups. I argue that Sandra Harding's description of traitors as insiders, who "become marginal" is misleading. Crafting a distinction between "privilege-cognizant" and "privilege-evasive" white scripts, I offer an alternative account of race traitors as privilege-cognizant whites who refuse to animate expected whitely scripts, and who are unfaithful to worldviews whites are expected to hold.
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  35. A rage shared by law: Post-september 11 racial violence as crimes of passion.Muneer I. Ahmad - unknown
    September 11 will long be associated with unthinkable violence. The sheer magnitude of the terrorist attacks, the visual imagery of the collapsing towers of the World Trade Center, and the extensive media attention given to the victims have defined the violence of September 11 in unitary terms. But in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks, another form of violence spread across the country: in the days and weeks after September 11, over one thousand bias incidents against Arabs, Muslims, and South (...)
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  36. Latinos and the categories of race.Linda Martin Alcoff - manuscript
    Apparently, Latinos are “taking over.” 1 With news that Latinos have become the largest minority group in the United States, the public airwaves are filled with concerned voices about the impact that a non-English dominant, Catholic, non-white, largely poor population will have on “American” identity. Aside from the hysteria, Latino identity poses some authentically new questions for the standard way in which minority identities are conceptualized. Are Latinos a race, an ethnicity, or some combination? What does it mean to have (...)
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