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  1. On non-ideal individual epistemology.Brett Karlan - forthcoming - International Journal of Philosophical Studies.
    Robin McKenna’s excellent Non-Ideal Epistemology is, among other things, a testament to restraint. McKenna does not want to unnecessarily inflame tensions between ideal and non-ideal theorists in epistemology. Often ideal and non-ideal projects are aimed at different target domains and not in tension with one another (though not always; e.g. McKenna 2023, ch. 6, especially pp. 112-21). In this commentary, I will have much less tact. I sketch a route by which the non-ideal epistemologist might become more belligerent towards their (...)
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  2. New perspectives on transparency and self-knowledge.Adam Andreotta & Benjamin Winokur (eds.) - 2025 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    This volume presents new perspectives on transparency-theoretic approaches to self-knowledge. It addresses many under-explored dimensions of transparency theories and considers their wider implications for epistemology, philosophy of mind, and psychology. It is natural to think that self-knowledge is gained through introspection, whereby we somehow peer inward and detect our mental states. However, so-called transparency theories emphasize our capacity to peer outward at the world, hence beyond our minds, in the pursuit of self-knowledge. For all their popularity in recent decades, transparency (...)
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  3. Limits of Demythologization, Critique of Ideology, Postmodern Critique of Reason and Critique of the Other: Unsuccessful Moments in the History of Modern Rationality.Fasil Merawi - 2023 - E-Logos 30 (2):56-70.
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  4. On instrumental zetetic normativity.Leonardo Flamini - forthcoming - Philosophical Topics.
    Jane Friedman claims that when we inquire, there is a tension between the instrumental normativity of our inquiries and some basic epistemic norms: The former forbids what the latter permit. Moreover, she argues that since the instrumental normativity of inquiry is epistemic, the previous tension shows that our current conception of epistemic normativity is incoherent and needs to be revised. To solve the problem, she suggests that all our epistemic norms should be considered “zetetic”, namely, norms of inquiry. In this (...)
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  5. Précis of “Das System der Ideen” (Alber, 2021).Michael Lewin - unknown
    The book (I) deals systematically with a conception of reason that creates and deploys ‘ideas’ as pure representations of something that is not or only partially given in experience. This conception—developed in Kant’s Transcendental Dialectic, unfolded throughout his works and set as the highest point in Fichte’s Wissenschaftslehre—is the most important key to understanding transcendental philosophy and classical German philosophy. Moreover, the book (II) argues that the set of theories regarding reason ‘in the narrower sense’ (the faculty of ideas) constitutes (...)
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  6. Justification as a dimension of rationality.Robert Weston Siscoe - 2024 - Philosophical Studies 181 (6):1523-1546.
    How are justified belief and rational belief related? Some philosophers think that justified belief and rational belief come to the same thing. Others take it that justification is a matter of how well a particular belief is supported by the evidence, while rational belief is a matter of how well a belief coheres with a person’s other beliefs. In this paper, I defend the view that justification is a dimension of rationality, a view that can make sense of both of (...)
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  7. Essentially Rational Animals.Matthew Boyle - 2012 - In Günter Abel & James Conant (eds.), Rethinking Epistemology, Volume 2. Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter.
    According to a tradition reaching back at least as far as Aristotle, human beings are set apart from other terrestrial creatures by their rationality. Other animals, according to this tradition, are capable of sensation and appetite, but they are not capable of thought, the kind of activity characteristic of the rational part of the soul. Human beings, by contrast, are rational animals, and an understanding of our minds must begin from a recognition of this distinctiveness. For, the tradition holds, the (...)
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  8. III—Doing Our ‘Best’? Utilitarianism, Rationality and the Altruist’s Dilemma.Max Khan Hayward - 2024 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 124 (1):49-70.
    Utilitarians think that what matters in ethics is making the world a better place. In that case, it might seem that we each rationally ought to do our best—perform the actions, out of those open to each of us, with the best expected outcomes. In other words, we should follow act-utilitarian reasons. But often the result of many altruistic agents following such individualistic reasons is worse than the result of them following collectivist ‘team-reasons’. So utilitarians should reject act utilitarianism, and (...)
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  9. On Philosophical Heuristics.Andrés Pereyra Rabanal - 2024 - Mεtascience: Scientific General Discourse 3:254-266.
    Philosophy can be regarded as a type of conceptual research subjected to the usual standards of rationality. However, there seems to be no objective and accepted criteria for evaluating and comparing philosophical theories. From a heuristic- and erotetic-based approach, philosophy is here considered a set of second-order reflections that are presupposed by more specific theories; and evaluated by their informativeness, adequateness, cogency, generality, novelty, and presuppositional nature. As a practice, one can proceed upwards (from problems to presuppositions) or downwards (from (...)
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  10. Unification without Pragmatism.Keshav Singh - forthcoming - Philosophical Issues.
    Both actions and beliefs are subject to normative evaluation as rational or irrational. As such, we might expect there to be some general, unified story about what makes them rational. However, orthodox approaches suggest that the rationality of action is determined by practical considerations, while the rationality of belief is determined by properly epistemic considerations. This apparent disunity leads some, like Rinard (2019), to reject orthodox theories of the rationality of belief in favor of pragmatism. In this paper, I argue (...)
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  11. Epistemic Rationality and Epistemic Normativity, written by Bondy, P.Guido Tana - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis:1-11.
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  12. The Prescriptive and the Hypological: A Radical Detachment.Maria Lasonen-Aarnio - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies.
    A wide range of more objectivist norms appear to leave uncharted an important part of normative space. In the beginning of this paper I briefly outline two broad ways of seeking more subject-directed norms: perspectivism and feasibilism. According to feasibilism, the ultimate reason why more objectivist norms are inadequate on their own is not that they fail to take into account the limits of an agent’s perspective, but that they are not sensitive to limits on what ways of choosing, acting, (...)
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  13. Representationalism and rationality: why mental representation is real.Krystyna Bielecka & Marcin Miłkowski - 2024 - Synthese 203 (5):1-17.
    This paper presents an argument for the realism about mechanisms, contents, and vehicles of mental representation at both the personal and subpersonal levels, and showcases its role in instrumental rationality and proper cognitive functioning. By demonstrating how misrepresentation is necessary for learning from mistakes and explaining certain failures of action, we argue that fallible rational agents must have mental representations with causally relevant vehicles of content. Our argument contributes to ongoing discussions in philosophy of mind and cognitive science by challenging (...)
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  14. Critical realism and the problem of (judgemental) rationality.Emanuele Lobina - unknown
    This talk concerns the emergence of rationality and ultimately aims to strengthen the ontological foundations of my own account of “agent-structure” interdependence (Lobina, 2013), and my ongoing attempts to contribute to a heterodox (i.e. critical realist) organisational economics. More precisely, I argue that the problem of de-stratified rationality can be solved within critical realism.
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  15. Permissivist Evidentialism.Elizabeth Jackson - forthcoming - In Scott Stapleford, Kevin McCain & Matthias Steup (eds.), Evidentialism at 40: New Arguments, New Angles. Routledge.
    Many evidentialists are impermissivists. But there’s no in-principle reason for this. In this paper, I examine and motivate permissivist evidentialism. Not only are permissivism and evidentialism compatible but there are unique benefits that arise for this combination of views. In particular, permissivist evidentialism respects the importance of evidence while capturing its limitations and provides a plausible and attractive explanation of the relationship between the epistemic and non-epistemic. Permissivist evidentialism is thus an attractive option in logical space that hasn’t received enough (...)
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  16. Glock, Hans Johann (2018). Animal rationality and belief. In: Andrews, Kirstin; Beck, Jacob. The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Animal Minds. London: Routledge, 89-99.Hans Johann Glock, Kirstin Andrews & Jacob Beck (eds.) - 2018
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  17. Practical Rationality & Human Difference: Perspectives on and beyond Aladair MacIntyre.Piotr Machura (ed.) - 2022 - Mediolan, Włochy:
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  18. Theological Anthropology at the Beginning of the Third Millenium.Thomas V. Gourlay (ed.) - 2022 - Eugene, OR, USA:
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  19. Leading under Pressure.Nicholas Maxwell (ed.) - forthcoming - Ottawa, ON, Canada:
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  20. Logic, Rationality, and Interaction. LORI 2015. Lecture Notes in Computer Science.Michael Cohen (ed.) - 2015 - Berlin: Springer.
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  21. Logic, Rationality, and Interaction. LORI 2017.Alexandru Baltag, Jeremy Seligman & Tomoyuki Yamada (eds.) - 2017 - Springer.
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  22. Rationality, Rules, and Ideals: Critical Essays on Bernard Gert’s Moral Theory.Geoffrey Sayre-McCord (ed.) - 2002 - Rowman and Littlefield.
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  23. Capabilities and justice for people who lack the capacity for reason and rationality.Iva Martinić & Elvio Baccarini - 2023 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 43 (3):495-507.
    In the article, we consider the objections of the capability approach to Rawls’s theory of public justification. The objection is that Rawls’s theory is considered with an exclusive focus on reason and rationality as essential properties of justice, excluding from the domain of justice people who do not possess these properties (such as people with severe cognitive impairments). We point out the shortcomings of the alternative proposal to the capability theory, which is based on the dignity of the species, because (...)
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  24. Rational Powers in Action: Instrumental Rationality and Extended Agency, by Sergio Tenenbaum.Erasmus Mayr - 2024 - Mind 133 (530):517-525.
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  25. What Mathematicians Do: Mathematics as Process and Creative Rationality.William Byers - 2024 - In Bharath Sriraman (ed.), Handbook of the History and Philosophy of Mathematical Practice. Cham: Springer. pp. 2289-2306.
    Mathematics can be viewed through complementary lenses as structure or as process. The latter point of view which is taken in this chapter (and this volume) emphasizes “doing mathematics” and so is tied to learning and creativity.Mathematics is not just any process but a rational one and this chapter investigates what is meant by reason in mathematics. A look at the way mathematics is actually done leads to an expansion of the usual understanding of reason by integrating of intuition and (...)
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  26. Rational representations of uncertainty: a pluralistic approach to bounded rationality.Isaac Davis - 2024 - Synthese 203 (5):1-30.
    An increasingly prevalent approach to studying human cognition is to construe the mind as optimally allocating limited cognitive resources among cognitive processes. Under this bounded rationality approach (Icard in Philos Sci 85(1):79–101, 2018; Simon in Utility and probability, Palgrave Macmillan, 1980), it is common to assume that resource-bounded cognitive agents approximate normative solutions to statistical inference problems, and that much of the bias and variability in human performance can be explained in terms of the approximation strategies we employ. In this (...)
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  27. “People aren’t numbers”: A critique of industrial rationality within neoliberal societies.Danelle Fourie - 2024 - South African Journal of Philosophy 43 (1):81-93.
    The main contribution of this article is to apply Herbert Marcuse’s work in contemporary neoliberal society. Specifically, this article will focus on Marcuse’s critique of advanced industrial society and the role that technology plays in the quantification of the self. In this article, I will argue that in recent years, the development of technology has created the possibility to measure, calculate and quantify even the most trivial aspects of our lives, reducing people to numbers. The quantification of people is done (...)
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  28. The zetetic turn and the procedural turn.David Thorstad - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophy.
    Epistemology has taken a zetetic turn from the study of belief towards the study of inquiry. Several decades ago, theories of bounded rationality took a procedural turn from attitudes towards the processes of inquiry that produce them. What is the relationship between the zetetic and procedural turns? In this paper, I argue that we should treat the zetetic turn in epistemology as part of a broader procedural turn in the study of bounded rationality. I use this claim to motivate and (...)
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  29. Capacity, Rationality, and the Promotion of Autonomy: A Trauma-Informed Approach to Refusals of Care After Opioid Poisoning.Cheryl Mack, Brendan Leier, Elaine Hyshka & Cameron Cattell - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (5):48-51.
    Marshall et al. (2024) raise questions regarding patient refusals of care. In this commentary we address refusals of care from the lens of patient autonomy and provide suggestions for patient cente...
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  30. Are Voters to Blame for the Polarization Crisis?Robert Weston Siscoe - 2023 - The Prindle Post.
    Who is responsible for growing political polarization? To many, the answer is obvious: Irrational voters are to blame. This irrationality results in motivated, in-group reasoning that only serves to further deepen the political divide. In this piece, I examine a perspective that holds that polarization results, not from irrationality, but from rational responses by voters to their limited epistemic resources.
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  31. How to lose your memory without losing your money: shifty epistemology and Dutch strategies.Darren Bradley - 2024 - Synthese 203 (4):1-15.
    An objection to shifty epistemologies such as subject-sensitive invariantism is that it predicts that agents are susceptible to guaranteed losses. Bob Beddor (Analysis, 81, 193–198, 2021) argues that these guaranteed losses are not a symptom of irrationality, on the grounds that forgetful agents are susceptible to guaranteed losses without being irrational. I agree that forgetful agents are susceptible to guaranteed losses without being irrational– but when we investigate why, the analogy with shifty epistemology breaks down. I argue that agents with (...)
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  32. The Propagation of Suspension of Judgment.Aldo Filomeno - 2022 - Erkenntnis 89 (4):1327-1348.
    It is not uncommon in the history of science and philosophy to encounter crucial experiments or crucial objections the truth-value of which we are ignorant, that is, about which we suspend judgment. Should we ignore such objections? Contrary to widespread practice, I show that in and only in some circumstances they should not be ignored, for the epistemically rational doxastic attitude is to suspend judgment also about the hypothesis that the objection targets. In other words, suspension of judgment “propagates” from (...)
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  33. Max Weber and Hans Kelsen : formal rationality and legitimacy of modern law.Michel Coutu - 2015 - In Ian Bryan, Peter Langford & John McGarry (eds.), The Reconstruction of the Juridico-Political: Affinity and Divergence in Hans Kelsen and Max Weber. New York, NY: Routledge.
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  34. Autochthony: Abandoning Social Mythologies of Rationality.Kenneth Liberman - forthcoming - Human Studies:1-18.
    Two seminal notions of Harold Garfinkel have endured despite some uncertainty and indeterminacy that accompany them: “autochthonous” and “tendentious”. These terms, which respect the dynamic and evolving nature of social interaction, describe how local parties discover, come upon, or develop coherent accounts that can assist them to lay hold of a local orderliness that is governing some mundane interaction. This paper illuminates these two notions, first theoretically and then empirically. Drawing upon the reflections of Garfinkel, Sacks, Schegloff, Mead, Husserl, Schutz, (...)
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  35. The rationality of recalcitrant emotions in weak judgmentalism.Xinyi Zhan - forthcoming - Mind and Society:1-12.
    Weak judgmentalism of emotions posits that emotions necessarily involve judgments. However, a standard critique of weak judgmentalism is that it cannot adequately account for the rationality of recalcitrant emotions, which persist despite the agent holding beliefs that conflict with them. This leads to the seemingly counter-intuitive conclusion that recalcitrant emotions are as irrational as logical mistakes. In response to this critique, I make two arguments. First, I distinguish between low-level and high-level beliefs, and argue that having two beliefs with contrary (...)
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  36. Conspiracy Panics: Political Rationality and Popular Culture.Jack Z. Bratich - 2008 - SUNY Press.
    While most other works focus on conspiracy theories, this book examines conspiracy panics, or the anxiety over the phenomenon of conspiracy theories. Jack Z. Bratich argues that conspiracy theories are portals into the major social issues defining U.S. and global political culture. These issues include the rise of new technologies, the social function of journalism, U.S. race relations, citizenship and dissent, globalization, biowarfare and biomedicine, and the shifting positions within the Left. Using a Foucauldian governmentality analysis, Bratich maintains that conspiracy (...)
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  37. Somatophilic Rationality for Reproductive Justice.Rodante van der Waal, Inge van Nistelrooij, Deborah Fox & Elizabeth Newnham - 2024 - Technophany 2 (1).
    A dominant strand of second wave feminism, represented in this essay by Firestone, is tied to a belief in technology to achieve reproductive justice, echoing Western somatophobic rationality. As such, it has difficulty formulating a critique of institutionalized reproductive technologies that have the capacity to perpetuate systemic racializing and misogynous violence, and envisioning a philosophy of reproductive justice where care for the body takes central stage. In this essay, we offer a perspective on achieving reproductive justice from an age-old position (...)
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  38. Reliabilist epistemology meets bounded rationality.Giovanni Dusi - 2024 - Synthese 203 (4):1-21.
    Epistemic reliabilism holds that a belief is justified if and only if it is produced by a reliable or truth-conducive process. I argue that reliabilism offers an epistemology for bounded rationality. This latter concept refers to normative and descriptive accounts of real-world reasoning instead of some ideal reasoning. However, as initially formulated, reliabilism involves an absolute, context-independent assessment of rationality that does not do justice to the fact that several processes are reliable in some reasoning environments but not in others, (...)
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  39. Knowledge Claims in Law and Economics : Gaps and Bridges between Theoretical and Practical Rationality.Péter Cserne - 2019 - In Péter Cserne & Magdalena Małecka (eds.), Law and Economics as Interdisciplinary Exchange: Philosophical, Methodological and Historical Perspectives. New York, NY: Routledge.
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  40. On the Thin Practical Rationality and its Thickenings.Vardenis Pavardenis - 1998 - Problemos 54.
    The article starts with the introduction of the Lithuanian reader into the expected utility theory which is the core of the decision theory known under the name of the rational choice theory or by the name of the thin theory of practical rationality too. This theroy conceives practical rationality as maximization of the expected utility defined as the measure of the preferences which satisfy the following conditions: (1) reflexivity; (2) completeness; (3) transitivity; (4) continuity; (5) preference increasing with probability and (...)
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  41. Rationality and/or Retribution.Phil Edwards - forthcoming - Archiv für Rechts- und Sozialphilosophie.
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  42. The Changing Status of Rationality in the Field of the New Rhetoric.Neli Stefanova - 2024 - Filosofiya-Philosophy 33 (1):106-122.
    The study aims to analyze the changes in the status of rationality in the field of the New Rhetoric – the most influential direction in the modern theory of argumentation, which appeared in the 1960s with the scientific works of C. Perelman – L. Olbrechts – Titeka and S. Toulmin. The thesis presented is that the practices of contemporary public discourse find their most logical and comprehensive theoretical explanation in the teachings of the New Rhetoric, which change the traditional status (...)
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  43. Rationality and Miracles.Charity Anderson - 2023 - In John Greco, Tyler Dalton McNabb & Jonathan Fuqua (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Religious Epistemology. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
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  44. Are the Ideals of Rationality Rational? On the Experimenter’s Regress, the Theoretician’s Regress, and the Epistemologist’s Progress.Olga E. Stoliarova & Столярова Ольга Евгеньевна - 2024 - RUDN Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):136-147.
    The research is devoted to the problem of philosophically justifying rationality, which inevitably takes the form of a circular argument: to define what rationality is, we must refrain from referring to its criteria, which must be rationally defined beforehand. This epistemic circle is compared to the so-called “experimenter’s regress”. The experimenter’s regress involves reasoning in which judging the correctness of obtained scientific results can only be based on the correctness of the procedure of obtaining them and judging the correctness of (...)
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  45. Schopenhauer's Representationalist Theory of Rationality : Logic, Eristic, Language and Mathematics.Jens Lemanski - 2023 - In David Bather Woods & Timothy Stoll (eds.), The Schopenhauerian mind. New York, NY: Routledge. pp. 22-40.
    The paper gives an overview of Arthur Schopenhauer's theory of rationality. For Schopenhauer, rationality is a human faculty based on language, which, in addition to language, is primarily concerned with knowledge or philosophy of science and practical action. For Schopenhauer, language is the umbrella term under which he subsumes logic and eristics. This paper will first introduce Schopenhauer's logic and clarify its connection to the philosophy of language. This is followed by eristic dialectics, which reflects on how one can protect (...)
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  46. Rationality in context: unstable virtues in an uncertain world.Steven Bland - 2024 - New York, NY: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
    This book uses the psychological literature on rationality to weigh in on the recent debate between virtue epistemologists and epistemic situationists. It argues that both sides have misconstrued the literature and that an interactionist framework is needed to square epistemic theory with empirical facts about reasoning and inference. The explosion of empirical literature on human rationality has led to seismic shifts across a multitude of academic disciplines. This book considers its implications for epistemology. In particular, it critically evaluates the treatment (...)
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  47. Why bounded rationality (in epistemology)?David Thorstad - 2024 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 108 (2):396-413.
    Bounded rationality gets a bad rap in epistemology. It is argued that theories of bounded rationality are overly context‐sensitive; conventionalist; or dependent on ordinary language (Carr, 2022; Pasnau, 2013). In this paper, I have three aims. The first is to set out and motivate an approach to bounded rationality in epistemology inspired by traditional theories of bounded rationality in cognitive science. My second aim is to show how this approach can answer recent challenges raised for theories of bounded rationality. My (...)
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  48. Religious Miracles versus Magic Tricks.Theodor Nenu - 2024 - Think 23 (67):39-46.
    This short article aims to strengthen Hume's case against the rationality of believing in religious miracles by incorporating certain lessons borrowed from the growing literature on the history and psychology of magic tricks.
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  49. Probabilistically coherent credences despite opacity.Christian List - forthcoming - Economics and Philosophy:1-10.
    Real human agents, even when they are rational by everyday standards, sometimes assign different credences to objectively equivalent statements, such as “George Orwell is a writer” and “Eric Arthur Blair is a writer”, or credences less than 1 to necessarily true statements, such as not-yet-proven theorems of arithmetic. Anna Mahtani calls this the phenomenon of “opacity” (a form of hyperintensionality). Opaque credences seem probabilistically incoherent, which goes against a key modelling assumption of probability theory. I sketch a modelling strategy for (...)
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  50. The Problematic Rationality of Private Property Rights.Emmanuel Picavet - 2024 - Environmental Ethics 46 (1):9-25.
    The “private” dimension of social life is problematic, posing conceptual, political, and ecological challenges. Some of these problems arise from the very nature of private property as it is enshrined in social life, which demands special privileges be granted to “private” matters on the grounds that these are private, because the predominant representation of the involved rights is that they reflect claims of the holders, rather than legitimate claims of society as a whole in allocating responsibilities, benefits, and duties. The (...)
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