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  1. Desert-Based Justice.Jeffrey Moriarty - 2018 - In Serena Olsaretti (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Distributive Justice. New York, NY, USA: pp. 152-173.
  2. Przyszłość wieloetnicznego państwa w Afryce. Perspektywa Ifeanyiego A. Menkitiego.Krzysztof Trzcinski - 2011 - In Europejczycy, Afrykanie, Inni. Studia ofiarowane Profesorowi Michałowi Tymowskiemu. Warszawa: pp. 595-619.
    W artykule tym przedstawiam i krytycznie analizuję główne wątki rozważań nigeryjskiego filozofa Ifeanyiego A. Menkitiego o przyszłości afrykańskiego państwa. Menkiti jest w pełni świadomy historycznej, etnicznej i terytorialnej specyfiki typowego pokolonialnego państwa w Afryce. Powstało ono w XX w. jako organizm charakteryzujący się bardzo głębokimi podziałami etnokulturowymi. Przebieg jego granic został jeszcze w czasach kolonialnych arbitralnie ustanowiony przez Europejczyków. W konsekwencji ich decyzji większość afrykańskich granic dzieli dziś członków wielu ludów na nominalnych obywateli różnych państw. Z drugiej strony, w granicach (...)
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  3. Political Liberalism, Autonomy, and Education.Blain Neufeld - forthcoming - In The Palgrave Handbook of Citizenship and Education.
    Citizens are politically autonomous insofar as they are subject to laws that are (a) justified by reasons acceptable to them and (b) authorized by them via their political institutions. An obstacle to the equal realization of political autonomy is the plurality of religious, moral, and philosophical views endorsed by citizens. Decisions regarding certain fundamental political issues (e.g., abortion) can involve citizens imposing political positions justified in terms of their respective worldviews upon others. Despite citizens’ disagreements over which worldview is correct, (...)
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  4. Defending 'A Conceptual Investigation of Justice'.Kyle Johannsen - 2019 - Dialogue 58 (4):763-78.
    In this paper, I explain the arguments my critics target and I respond to their criticisms. Some of my replies further expand upon the ideas covered in my book—'A Conceptual Investigation of Justice'—and some cover matters that weren’t discussed there. This paper thus substantially contributes to the arguments made in my book.
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  5. Conceptual Disagreement About Justice: Verbal, but Not Merely Verbal.Kyle Johannsen - 2019 - Dialogue 58 (4):701-9.
    In this paper, I introduce the articles contained in this special issue, and I briefly explain some of the main arguments presented in my book 'A Conceptual Investigation of Justice'. A central claim in my book is that a verbal and yet also philosophically substantial disagreement over the word ‘justice’ lies at the heart of a number of issues in contemporary political philosophy. Over the course of introducing my book’s arguments and the commentaries in this issue, I also offer an (...)
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  6. Rawlsian Self-Respect.Cynthia Stark - 2012 - In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics. Oxford, UK: pp. 238-261.
    Critics have argued that Rawls's account of self-respect is equivocal. I show, first, that Rawls in fact relies upon an unambiguous notion of self-respect, though he sometimes is unclear as to whether this notion has merely instrumental or also intrinsic value. I show second that Rawls’s main objective in arguing that justice as fairness supports citizens’ self-respect is not, as many have thought, to show that his principles support citizens’ self-respect generally, but to show that his principles counter the effects (...)
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  7. Rescuing Rawls’s Institutionalism and Incentives Inequality.Edward Greetis - 2019 - Res Publica 25 (4):571-590.
    G. A. Cohen argues that Rawls’s difference principle is incompatible with his endorsement of incentives inequality—higher pay for certain professions is just when that pay benefits everyone. Cohen concludes that Rawls must reject both incentives inequality and ‘institutionalism’—the view that egalitarian principles, including the difference principle, apply exclusively to social institutions. I argue that the premises of Cohen’s ‘internal criticism’ of Rawls require rejecting two important parts of his theory: a ‘subjective circumstance of justice’ and a ‘shared conception of justice’. (...)
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  8. Rawls y el pricipio aristótelico. Una aproximación a la idea de bien en A Theory of Justice.Pablo Aguayo Westwood - 2014 - Ideas Y Valores 156 (LVIII):129-143.
    Con la finalidad de fundamentar y reforzar su teoría de los bienes primarios, J. Rawls introduce, en el §65 de Una teoría de la justicia, la idea de “principio aristotélico”. Se discuten las dificultades que implica aceptar dicha noción, así como las limitaciones de la idea de bien que subyace en dicho principio. Se busca mostrar que la concepción de bien que Rawls presenta allí padece de “insuficiencia moral” y se defiende la tesis de que su aproximación a la idea (...)
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  9. Robert S. Taylor, Reconstructing Rawls: The Kantian Foundations of Justice as Fairness , 360 Pp. ISBN: 978-0271037714. $74.95. [REVIEW]Paul Voice - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (6):799-801.
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  10. Taylor, Robert S. Reconstructing Rawls: The Kantian Foundations of Justice as Fairness. Philadelphia: Pennsylvania University Press, 2011. Pp. 60. $74.95. [REVIEW]Catherine Galko Campbell - 2012 - Ethics 122 (3):632-637.
  11. Book ReviewsThomas Pogge,. John Rawls: His Life and Theory of Justice. Translated by, Kosch Michelle.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 228+Xv. $25.00. [REVIEW]Anthony Simon Laden - 2009 - Ethics 119 (3):594-598.
  12. Book Review: Rawls and Habermas: Reason, Pluralism and the Claims of Political PhilosophyHedrickToddRawls and Habermas: Reason, Pluralism and the Claims of Political Philosophy, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2010. [REVIEW]Jørgen Pedersen - 2013 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (4):569-575.
  13. Book Review: Rawls Explained: From Fairness to UtopiaVoicePaul. 2011. Rawls Explained: From Fairness to Utopia. Chicago: Open Court. [REVIEW]Rajesh Sampath - 2014 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (6):843-847.
  14. Freedom, Money and Justice as Fairness.Blain Neufeld - 2017 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 16 (1):70-92.
    The first principle of Rawls’s conception of justice secures a set of ‘basic liberties’ equally for all citizens within the constitutional structure of society. The ‘worth’ of citizens’ liberties, however, may vary depending upon their wealth. Against Rawls, Cohen contends that an absence of money often can directly constrain citizens’ freedom and not simply its worth. This is because money often can remove legally enforced constraints on what citizens can do. Cohen’s argument – if modified to apply to citizens’ ‘moral (...)
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  15. Rawls's Lexical Orderings Are Good Economics: Robert D. Cooter.Robert D. Cooter - 1989 - Economics and Philosophy 5 (1):47-54.
    Basic liberty, according to Rawls's first principle of justice, is not to be sacrificed for other values such as wealth. And, according to his second principle of justice, the material well-being of the worst-off members of society is not to be sacrificed to benefit better-off members of society. These trade-offs would be unjust, according to Rawls, no matter how small the sacrifice or how large the offsetting benefit. A decision-maker conforming to Rawls's theory, who is unwilling to sacrifice some values (...)
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  16. Who Owns What? An Egalitarian Interpretation of John Rawls's Idea of a Property‐Owning Democracy.Thad Williamson - 2009 - Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (3):434-453.
  17. Justice for the Disabled: A Contractualist Approach.Christie Hartley - 2009 - Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (1):17-36.
  18. Maximin Justice, Sacrifice, and the Reciprocity Argument: A Pragmatic Reassessment of the Rawls/Nozick Debate: Stephen W. Ball.Stephen W. Ball - 1993 - Utilitas 5 (2):157-184.
    Theories of economic justice are characteristically based on abstract ethical concerns often unrelated to practical distributive results. Two decades ago, Rawls's theory of justice began as a reaction against the alleged ‘sacrifices’ condoned by utilitarian theory. One variant of this objection is that utilitarianism permits gross inequalities, severe deprivations of individual liberty, or even the enslavement of society's least well-off individuals. There are, however, more subtle forms of the objection. In Rawls, it is often waged without any claim that utilitarianism (...)
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  19. Justice in Context: Assessing Contextualism as an Approach to Justice.Buckley Michael - 2012 - Ethics and Global Politics 5 (2):71-94.
    Moral and political philosophers are increasingly using empirical data to inform their normative theories. This has sparked renewed interest into questions concerning the relationship between facts and principles. A recent attempt to frame these questions within a broader approach to normative theory comes from David Miller, who has on several occasions defended ‘contextualism’ as the best approach to justice. Miller argues that the context of distribution itself brings one or another political principle into play. This paper examines this claim. It (...)
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  20. Rawls, Equality, and Democracy.C. Baker - 2008 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (3):203-246.
    Part I distinguishes epistemic and choice democracy, attributing the first to the Rawls of A Theory of Justice but arguing that the second is more justifiable. Part II argues that in comparison with the difference principle, three principles — equal participation in choice democracy, no subordinating purpose, and a just wants guarantee — constitute a more rational choice in the original position; and that they better provide all the benefits claimed for the difference principle in its comparison with either average (...)
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  21. Understanding Rawls: A Reconstruction and Critique of a Theory of Justice.Barry R. Gross - 1977 - Ethics 89 (1):115-120.
  22. A Puzzle About Economic Justice in Rawls’ Theory.Jan Narveson - 1976 - Social Theory and Practice 4 (1):1-27.
  23. Some Comments on Rawls’ Theory of Justice.Norman Bowie - 1974 - Social Theory and Practice 3 (1):65-74.
  24. Utilitarianism Versus Rawls: Defending Teleological Moral Theory.Timothy D. Roche - 1982 - Social Theory and Practice 8 (2):189-212.
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  25. Understanding Rawls; a Reconstruction and Critique of a Theory of Justice. [REVIEW]G. W. - 1977 - Review of Metaphysics 30 (4):778-778.
    According to Wolff, Rawls’ thinking developed through three stages, represented respectively by his article "Justice as Fairness," which appeared in 1958; a second article, "Distributive Justice," published nine years later; and the 1971 book A Theory of Justice. Wolff proceeds, in his "reconstruction and critique," by setting forth his understanding of "the central idea, or key, of Rawls’ work", then tracing the development of the idea from Rawls’ article of 1958 through the "final baroque complexity" of the 1971 book, continuing (...)
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  26. Can Justice as Fairness Accommodate Diversity? An Examination of the Representation of Minorities and Women in A Theory of Justice.Lara M. Trout - 1994 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (3):39-45.
    The purpose of this paper is to expose a problem of application in John Rawls’ theory of justice. An examination of his treatment of the application of his principles in A Theory of Justice reveals an insensitivity toward the proper representation of minorities and women. This problem, which is rooted in Rawls’ conception of the relevant social position is not properly addressed by him, yet is grounded in inconsistencies which undermine the just practical implementation of his theory. A provisional solution (...)
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  27. John Rawls’ Theory of Social Justice: An Introduction. [REVIEW]John T. Wilcox - 1985 - International Studies in Philosophy 17 (3):85-86.
  28. ‘Perhaps the Most Important Primary Good’: Self-Respect and Rawls’s Principles of Justice.Nir Eyal - 2005 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 4 (2):195-219.
    The article begins by reconstructing the just distribution of the social bases of self-respect, a principle of justice that is covert in Rawls’s writing. I argue that, for Rawls, justice mandates that each social basis for self-respect be equalized. Curiously, for Rawls, that principle ranks higher than Rawls’s two more famous principles of justice - equal liberty and the difference principle. I then recall Rawls’s well-known confusion between self-respect and another form of self-appraisal, namely, confidence in one’s determinate plans and (...)
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  29. Rawls and Walzer on Non-Domestic Justice.Caroline Walsh - 2007 - Contemporary Political Theory 6 (4):419-436.
    This article illuminates the relationship between John Rawls' and Michael Walzer's accounts of non-domestic justice by tracing its connection to their domestic relationship. More precisely, it places the celebrated positional shifts that characterize the latter within the context of the fundamental justificatory tension between their projects which endures: reason vs trust; and then juxtaposes this justificatory tension and their non-domestic political prescriptions. Such contextualization is important to the clarification of the pair's non-domestic relationship since it enables the observation that despite (...)
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  30. Just Democracy: The Rawls-Machiavelli Programme, by Philippe Van Parijs.Simon Thompson - 2013 - Contemporary Political Theory 12 (1):e19-e21.
  31. The Legacy of John Rawls.Thomas Porter - 2009 - Contemporary Political Theory 8 (2):237-239.
  32. John Rawls.Paul Graham - 2008 - Contemporary Political Theory 7 (4):449-451.
  33. Rawls and Left Criticism.Arthur DiQuattro - 1983 - Political Theory 11 (1):53-78.
  34. The Procedural Republic and the Unencumbered Self.Michael J. Sandel - 1984 - Political Theory 12 (1):81-96.
  35. On DiQuattro, “Rawls and Left Criticism”.Lawrence J. Connin - 1985 - Political Theory 13 (1):138-141.
  36. Rawls Versus Hayek.Arthur DiQuattro - 1986 - Political Theory 14 (2):307-310.
  37. The Original Position as Social Practice.Stephen L. Esquith & Richard T. Peterson - 1988 - Political Theory 16 (2):300-334.
  38. Is the Free Market Acceptable to Everyone?Matthew Clayton & David Stevens - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (4):363-382.
    In this paper we take issue with two central claims that John Tomasi makes in Free Market Fairness. The first claim is that Rawls’s difference principle can better be realized by free market institutions than it can be by state interventionist regimes such as property-owning democracy or liberal socialism. We argue that Tomasi’s narrow interpretation of the difference principle, which focuses largely on wealth and income, leaves other goods worryingly unsatisfied. The second claim is that a wide set of economic (...)
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  39. Self-Respect or Self-Delusion? Tomasi and Rawls on the Basic Liberties.Richard Penny - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (4):397-411.
    A central feature of John Tomasi’s ‘Free Market Fairness’ is the emphasis it places upon the good of self-respect. Like Rawls, Tomasi believes that accounts of justice ought to offer support for the self-respect of citizens. Indeed, this is a key way in which Tomasi aspires to engage with the ‘high-liberal’ tradition. Unlike Rawls however, Tomasi argues that this support is best provided by our treating a broader set of economic liberties as basic liberties. In this paper I raise two (...)
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  40. The Fair Value of Economic Liberty.Daniel Layman - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (4):413-428.
    In Free Market Fairness, John Tomasi tries to show that ‘thick’ economic liberties, including the right to own productive property, are basic liberties. According to Tomasi, the policy-level consequences of protecting economic liberty as basic are essentially libertarian in character. I argue that if economic liberties are basic, just societies must guarantee their fair value to all citizens. And in order to secure the fair value of economic liberty, states must guarantee that citizens of roughly similar dispositions and talents are (...)
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  41. Dream Capitalism.Chris Pierson - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (4):383-395.
    In my reading of Free Market Fairness, I challenge Tomasi’s key assumption that that we can and should pursue the account of social justice laid down in its essentials by John Rawls, but with this one crucial change, that the ‘economic liberties’ which Rawls excludes from his framework of basic liberties should be included on that list and be appropriately prioritized and protected. I argue that Rawls had very good grounds for excluding the right to own productive capital from his (...)
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  42. Are The Economic Liberties Basic?Alan Patten - 2014 - Critical Review 26 (3-4):362-374.
    ABSTRACTAccording to John Tomasi's Free Market Fairness, there are serious constraints on what a liberal state may do to promote economic justice. Tomasi defends this claim by arguing that important economic liberties ought to be regarded as “basic” and given special priority over other liberal concerns, including those of economic justice. I argue that Tomasi's defense of this claim is unsuccessful. One problem takes the form of a dilemma: depending on how the claim is formulated more precisely, Tomasi's argument seems (...)
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  43. A Preface to Economic Democracy.Robert H. Dahl (ed.) - 1985 - University of California Press.
    Tocqueville pessimistically predicted that liberty and equality would be incompatible ideas. Robert Dahl, author of the classic _A Preface to Democratic Theory,_ explores this alleged conflict, particularly in modern American society where differences in ownership and control of corporate enterprises create inequalities in resources among Americans that in turn generate inequality among them as citizens. Arguing that Americans have misconceived the relation between democracy, private property, and the economic order, the author contends that we can achieve a society of real (...)
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  44. Piketty, Meade and Predistribution.Martin O'Neill - forthcoming - Crooked Timber Book Seminar on Thomas Piketty, Capital in the Twenty-First Century.
    If solutions to the problem of inequality are to be as radical as reality now demands, what is instead required is a reimagining of what would be involved comprehensively to tame capitalism through democratic means. This will involve much further development of the kind of plurality of institutional and policy proposals sketched by Meade, and will involve both the private and public – individual and collective – forms of capital predistribution that Meade advocated. Piketty, like Meade, sees the need for (...)
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  45. Liberal Socialism: An Alternative Social Ideal Grounded in Rawls and Marx.Ian Hunt - 2015 - Lexington Books.
    Liberal Socialism exposes false ideas of justice behind neo-liberal capitalism and combines Rawls's ideas on justice and Marx's views on capitalism to make a plausible case for the alternative social ideal of liberal socialism. A fixed social structure gives equal weight to all competing claims for rights, liberties, and shares of the burdens and benefits of social cooperation, while allowing a democratic majority vote for liberal socialism.
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  46. Why Free Market Rights Are Not Basic Liberties.C. M. Melenovsky & Justin Bernstein - 2015 - Journal of Value Inquiry 49 (1-2):47-67.
    Most liberals agree that governments should protect certain basic liberties, such as freedom of speech, freedom of religion and freedom of the person. Liberals disagree, however, about whether free market rights should also be protected. By “free market rights,” we mean those rights typically associated with laissez-faire economic systems such as freedom of contract, a right to market returns, and claims to privately own the means of production.We do not use the phrase “economic liberties,” as Tomasi does, because it does (...)
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  47. Putting Incentives in Context: A Reply to Penny.Harrison P. Frye - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (1):93-98.
    Richard Penny argues that Rawls’s commitment to self-respect puts him at odds with his endorsement of unequalizing incentives. Penny draws on G.A. Cohen’s distinction between ‘lax’ and ‘strict’ readings of the difference principle to make this point. Given this, Penny concludes that Rawls faces a dilemma: either Rawls weakens his endorsement of unequalizing incentives or weakens his commitment to self-respect. By taking the difference principle in isolation, Penny creates a false dilemma. I will argue that once we place the difference (...)
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  48. Rawls' Theory of Justice and 'Market Socialism'.Carl G. Hedman - 1981 - Radical Philosophy 28:23.
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  49. Intergenerational Altruism and the Irrelevance of Redistribution in Rawls' Original Position.F. Woolley - 1989 - Taxation, Incentives and the Distribution of Income Programme.
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  50. Economic Liberties and the Constitution. [REVIEW]William Burt - 1982 - Reason Papers 8:101-107.
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