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  1. Constructing Justice for Existing Practice: Rawls and the Status Quo.J. Aaron - 2006 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 33:281 - 316.
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  2. The Limits of Rawlsian Justice.Roberto Alejandro - 1998 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
    The idea of fairness lies at the heart of the concept of justice proposed by political philosopher John Rawls, a concept that liberals have often invoked to defend the welfare state. In The Limits of Rawlsian Justice political theorist Roberto Alejandro challenges the assumptions that Rawls set out to defend his position. While other opponents of Rawls have attempted to offer an alternative to his concept of justice as fairness, Alejandro instead examines Rawls from within his own writings, testing Rawls's (...)
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  3. The Handbook of Rational and Social Choice.Paul Anand, Prastanta Pattanaik & Clemens Puppe (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The Handbook of Rational and Social Choice provides an overview of issues arising in work on the foundations of decision theory and social choice over the past ...
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  4. Revisiting Rawls:A Theory of Justice in the Light of Levi's Theory of Decision.Erik Angner - 2004 - Theoria 70 (1):3-21.
  5. Introduction to Rawls on Justice and Rawls on Utilitarianism.Richard Arneson - unknown
    According to Rawls, the principles of justice are principles that determine a fair resolution of conflicts of interest among persons in a society. “A set of principles is required for choosing among the various social arrangements which determine this division of advantages and for underwriting an agreement on the proper distributive shares” (p. 4). Different interpretations or conceptions of justice fill out this core concept; a theory of justice seeks a best conception. Justice takes priority over other normative claims—as Rawls (...)
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  6. The Difference Principle and Time.Daniel Attas - 2008 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 7 (2):209-232.
    Rawls's difference principle contains a certain normative ambiguity, so that opposing views, including strong inegalitarian ones, might find a home under it. The element that introduces this indeterminacy is the absence of an explicit reference to time . Thus, a society that agrees on the difference principle as the proper justification of basic political-economic institutions, might nevertheless disagree on whether their specific institutions are justified by that principle. Such disagreement would most often centre on issues of fact: will a more (...)
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  7. Rawls: Politique Et Métaphysique.Catherine Audard (ed.) - 2004 - Presses Universitaire de France.
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  8. Rawls in France.Catherine Audard - 2002 - European Journal of Political Theory 1 (2):215-227.
    The reception of Rawls in France has been an extremely complex story where forces of innovation have been, in the end, overwhelmed by the resistance of `philosophical nationalism'. This is surprising as, in many ways, France was going through tremendous changes and modernization at the time of the translation of A Theory of Justice in 1987. In that context, Rawls's project seemed to have something useful and suggestive to offer: bridging the gap between freedom and equality in a new version (...)
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  9. Rawls, Equality, and Democracy.Baker C. Edwin - 2008 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (3):203-246.
    Part I distinguishes epistemic and choice democracy, attributing the first to the Rawls of A Theory of Justice but arguing that the second is more justifiable. Part II argues that in comparison with the difference principle, three principles — equal participation in choice democracy, no subordinating purpose, and a just wants guarantee — constitute a more rational choice in the original position; and that they better provide all the benefits claimed for the difference principle in its comparison with either average (...)
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  10. Maximin Justice, Sacrifice, and the Reciprocity Argument: A Pragmatic Reassessment of the Rawls/Nozick Debate.Stephen W. Ball - 1993 - Utilitas 5 (2):157.
    Theories of economic justice are characteristically based on abstract ethical concerns often unrelated to practical distributive results. Two decades ago, Rawls's theory of justice began as a reaction against the alleged ‘sacrifices’ condoned by utilitarian theory. One variant of this objection is that utilitarianism permits gross inequalities, severe deprivations of individual liberty, or even the enslavement of society's least well-off individuals. There are, however, more subtle forms of the objection. In Rawls, it is often waged without any claim that utilitarianism (...)
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  11. Choosing Between Choice Models of Ethics: Rawlsian Equality, Utilitarianism, and the Concept of Persons.Stephen W. Ball - 1987 - Theory and Decision 22 (3):209-224.
  12. Social Justice: Defending Rawls' Theory of Justice Against Honneth's Objections.M. Bankovsky - 2011 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (1):95-118.
    This article argues that Honneth’s ‘plural conception of justice’, founded on a theory of recognition, does not succeed in distancing itself from Rawls’ liberal theory of justice. The article develops its argument by evaluating three major objections to Rawls’ liberalism raised by Honneth in his recent articles on justice: namely, first, that the parties responsible for choosing principles of justice are too individualistic and their practical reasoning too instrumentalist; second, that by taking as its ‘object-domain’ the negative liberty of persons, (...)
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  13. John Rawls and the Search for Stability. [REVIEW]Brian Barry - 1995 - Ethics 105 (4):874 - 915.
  14. The Rationality of the "Original Position": A Defense.Joseph Beatty - 1982 - Ethics 93 (3):484-495.
  15. Natural Justice.K. G. Binmore - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Natural Justice is a bold attempt to lay the foundations for a genuine science of morals using the theory of games. Since human morality is no less a product of evolution than any other human characteristic, the book takes the view that we need to explore its origins in the food-sharing social contracts of our prehuman ancestors. It is argued that the deep structure of our current fairness norms continues to reflect the logic of these primeval social contracts, but the (...)
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  16. Radical Liberalism, Rawls and the Welfare State: Justifying the Politics of Basic Income.Simon Birnbaum - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (4):495-516.
  17. The Primary-Goods Indexation Problem in Rawls's Theory of Justice.Douglas H. Blair - 1988 - Theory and Decision 24 (3):239-252.
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  18. John Rawls' Theory of Social Justice.Gene Blocker & Elizabeth Smith (eds.) - 1980 - Ohio University Press.
  19. The Aim of a Theory of Justice.Martijn Boot - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):7-21.
    Amartya Sen argues that for the advancement of justice identification of ‘perfect’ justice is neither necessary nor sufficient. He replaces ‘perfect’ justice with comparative justice. Comparative justice limits itself to comparing social states with respect to degrees of justice. Sen’s central thesis is that identifying ‘perfect’ justice and comparing imperfect social states are ‘analytically disjoined’. This essay refutes Sen’s thesis by demonstrating that to be able to make adequate comparisons we need to identify and integrate criteria of comparison. This is (...)
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  20. Some Comments on Rawls' Theory of Justice.Norman Bowie - 1974 - Social Theory and Practice 3 (1):65-74.
  21. Taking Liberties with the Concept of Rules.David Braybrooke - 1968 - The Monist 52 (3):329-358.
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  22. Rawls's Neglected Childhood: Reflections on the Original Position, Stability, and the Child's Sense of Justice.Samantha Brennan & Robert Noggle - unknown
  23. A Critique of the Laws of Moral Psychology in Rawls' a Theory of Justice.Arthur Brickman - 1980 - World Futures 16 (3):281-300.
    (1980). A critique of the laws of moral psychology in Rawls’ a theory of justice. World Futures: Vol. 16, Nationalism in an Interdependent World II, pp. 281-300.
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  24. Investment Income in Rawls' Theory of Justice.Rupert Buchanan - 1983 - Dialogue 22 (3):539-542.
  25. God's Joust, God's Justice: Law and Religion in the Western Tradition. By John Witte, Jr., Reaping the Whirlwind: Liberal Democracy & The Religious Axis. By John R. Pottenger and A Theology of Public Life. By Charles Matthewes. [REVIEW]John Burk - 2010 - Heythrop Journal 51 (4):690-693.
  26. Economic Liberties and the Constitution. [REVIEW]William Burt - 1982 - Reason Papers 8:101-107.
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  27. Taylor , Robert S. Reconstructing Rawls: The Kantian Foundations of Justice as Fairness . Philadelphia: Pennsylvania University Press, 2011. Pp. 60. $74.95 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Catherine Galko Campbell - 2012 - Ethics 122 (3):632-637.
  28. Rawls and Natural Aristocracy.Matthew Clayton - 2001 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):239-259.
    The author discusses Rawls’s conception of socioeconomic justice, Democratic Equality. He contrasts Rawls’s account, which includes the difference principle constrained by the principle of fair equality of opportunity, with Natural Aristocracy, which constrains the difference principle only by the principle of careers open to talents. According to the author, many of Rawls’s own arguments support NaturalAristocracy over Democratic Equality. In particular, Natural Aristocracy appears well placed to avoid a challenge that naturally arises in consideration of Democratic Equality, with respect to (...)
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  29. Is the Free Market Acceptable to Everyone?Matthew Clayton & David Stevens - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (4):363-382.
    In this paper we take issue with two central claims that John Tomasi makes in Free Market Fairness. The first claim is that Rawls’s difference principle can better be realized by free market institutions than it can be by state interventionist regimes such as property-owning democracy or liberal socialism. We argue that Tomasi’s narrow interpretation of the difference principle, which focuses largely on wealth and income, leaves other goods worryingly unsatisfied. The second claim is that a wide set of economic (...)
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  30. On DiQuattro, “Rawls and Left Criticism”.L. J. Connin - 1985 - Political Theory 13 (1):138-141.
  31. Rawls's Lexical Orderings Are Good Economics.Robert D. Cooter - 1989 - Economics and Philosophy 5 (1):47.
    Basic liberty, according to Rawls's first principle of justice, is not to be sacrificed for other values such as wealth. And, according to his second principle of justice, the material well-being of the worst-off members of society is not to be sacrificed to benefit better-off members of society. These trade-offs would be unjust, according to Rawls, no matter how small the sacrifice or how large the offsetting benefit. A decision-maker conforming to Rawls's theory, who is unwilling to sacrifice some values (...)
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  32. Justice as Fairness, Civic Identity, and Patriotic Education.M. Victoria Costa - 2009 - Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (2):95-114.
    The ideal model of a just society defended by John Rawls entails the existence of certain institutions—those that form the basic structure of society—that guarantee citizens' basic rights and liberties, equality of opportunity, and access to material resources. Such a model also presupposes a certain account of reasonable citizenship. In particular, reasonable citizens will have a set of moral capacities and dispositions and will voluntarily support just institutions. According to Rawls, the need for such citizens is related to the following (...)
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  33. Politieke Orde En Rawlsiaanse Rechtvaardigheid [Political Order and Rawlsian Justice].Bernard Cullen - 1990 - Irish Philosophical Journal 7 (1/2):200-202.
  34. A Preface to Economic Democracy.Robert H. Dahl (ed.) - 1985 - University of California Press.
    Tocqueville pessimistically predicted that liberty and equality would be incompatible ideas. Robert Dahl, author of the classic _A Preface to Democratic Theory,_ explores this alleged conflict, particularly in modern American society where differences in ownership and control of corporate enterprises create inequalities in resources among Americans that in turn generate inequality among them as citizens. Arguing that Americans have misconceived the relation between democracy, private property, and the economic order, the author contends that we can achieve a society of real (...)
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  35. On Liberty and Inequality in Rawls.Norman Daniels - 1974 - Social Theory and Practice 3 (2):149-159.
  36. On Some Problems Arising From Professor Rawls' Conception of Distributive Justice.Partha Dasgupta - 1974 - Theory and Decision 4 (3-4):325-344.
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  37. Moral Agents and Political Spectators. On Some Virtues and Vices of Rawls’s Liberalism.Giovanni De Grandis - 2007 - Politics and Ethics Review 2 (3):217-235.
    The paper defends the theoretical strength and consistency of Rawls's constructivism, showing its ability to articulate and convincingly weave together several key ethical ideas; yet it questions the political relevance of this admirable normative architecture. After having illustrated Rawls's conception of moral agency and practical reason, the paper tackles two criticisms raised by Scheffler. First the allegation of naturalism based on Rawls's disdain of common sense ideas on desert is rebutted. It is then shown that, contrary to Scheffler's contention, Rawls (...)
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  38. La Giustizia E Il Bene.Giovanni De Grandis - 2003 - Teoria Politica (2-3):341-369.
    In this article an attempt is made of presenting the deontological feature of A Theory of Justice under a new light. Through an exploration of the meaning of the priority of the good over the right and of the significance and function of the argument of the congruence between justice and individual good, the differences between teleology and deontology are displayed. Deontology seems to have several advantages: a) it allows for pluralism of values and a richer and deeper understanding of (...)
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  39. Un maquillage molto leggero. Considerazioni sulla riformulazione della giustizia come equita’ di John Rawls. [REVIEW]Giovanni De Grandis - 2002 - Etica E Politica 4 (1).
    In this review of Rawls’ last publication two aims are pursued. First, an attempt is made to clarify how this new work makes the deep structure of the theory emerge, thus indicating the way the different arguments, assumptions and conceptions are strictly intertwined. The main point is to show that the overlapping consensus does not bear a foundational role, since justification rests on the combined work of reflective equilibrium and of the original position. The possibility of an overlapping consensus simply (...)
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  40. Making Sense of A Theory of Justice.Giovanni de Grandis - 2001 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):283-306.
    The primary aim of this interpretive essay is to reconstruct some of the most important features of Rawls’s theory of justice, and to offer a hypothesis about how its assumptions and arguments are tied together in a highly structured construction. An almost philological approach is adopted to highlight Rawlsian ideas. First, I consider in what sense Rawls is an individualist and in what sense he is not. Fromthis I conclude that he ought not be charged of psychological egoism or atomism. (...)
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  41. Rawls Versus Hayek.A. DiQuattro - 1986 - Political Theory 14 (2):307-310.
  42. Rawls and Left Criticism.A. DiQuattro - 1983 - Political Theory 11 (1):53-78.
  43. The Place of Self-Respect in a Theory of Justice.Gerald Doppelt - 2009 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 52 (2):127 – 154.
    This essay provides a critical examination of Rawls' (and Rawlsians') conception of self-respect, the social bases of self-respect, and the normative justification of equality in the social bases of self-respect. I defend a rival account of these notions and the normative ideals at stake in political liberalism and a theory of social justice. I make the following arguments: (1) I argue that it is unreasonable to take self-respect to be a primary social good, as Rawls and his interpreters characterize it; (...)
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  44. Rawlsian Justice and Non-Human Animals.Robert Elliot - 1984 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (1):95-106.
    In his book, A Theory of Justice, John Rawls argues against the inclusion of non-human animals within the scope of the principles of justice developed therein. However, the reasons Rawls, and certain commentators, have advanced in support of this view do not adequately support it. Against Rawls' view that 'we are not required to give strict justice' to creatures lacking the capacity for a sense of justice, it is initially argued that (i) de facto inclusion should be accorded non-human animals (...)
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  45. The Original Position as Social Practice.S. L. Esquith & R. T. Peterson - 1988 - Political Theory 16 (2):300-334.
  46. The Survival of Egalitarian Justice in John Rawls's Political Liberalism.David Estlund - 1996 - Journal of Political Philosophy 4 (1):68–78.
  47. ‘Perhaps the Most Important Primary Good’: Self-Respect and Rawls’s Principles of Justice.Nir Eyal - 2005 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 4 (2):195-219.
    The article begins by reconstructing the just distribution of the social bases of self-respect, a principle of justice that is covert in Rawls’s writing. I argue that, for Rawls, justice mandates that each social basis for self-respect be equalized (and, as a second priority, maximized). Curiously, for Rawls, that principle ranks higher than Rawls’s two more famous principles of justice - equal liberty and the difference principle. I then recall Rawls’s well-known confusion between self-respect and another form of self-appraisal, namely, (...)
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  48. Dualism, Incentives and the Demands of Rawlsian Justice.Colin Farrelly - unknown
    In “Institutions and the Demands of Justice,” Liam Murphy ~1999! makes a distinction between two approaches to normative political theory. He labels these two positions “dualism” and “monism.” The former maintains that “the two practical problems of institutional design and personal conduct require, at the fundamental level, two different kinds of practical principle” ~1999: 254!. The most influential proponent of dualism is John Rawls. In A Theory of Justice Rawls defends his theory of “justice as fairness,” which recognizes a division (...)
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  49. The Liberal Grounding of the Right to Health Care: An Egalitarian Critique.Dani Filc - 2007 - Theoria 54 (112):51-72.
    The language of rights is increasingly used to regulate access to health care and allocation of resources in the health care field. The right to health has been grounded on different theories of justice. Scholars within the liberal tradition have grounded the right to health care on Rawls's two principles of justice. Thus, the right to health care has been justified as being one of the basic liberties, as enabling equality of opportunity, or as being justified by the maximin principle. (...)
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  50. The Virtues of Eclecticism.Samuel Fleischacker - 2011 - Process Studies 40 (2):232-252.
    Rawls and others have held that political agents in a liberal democracy should argue for their positions without adverting to religious grounds. I suggest here that this is because moral claims in general should not be grounded in religious views. Morality, I argue, consists in norms and ideals that can be defendedfrom many different comprehensive views of the good life, not from any single one (whether that single view be religious or not). It follows that politics, even insofaras it is (...)
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