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  1. Rescuing Rawls’s Institutionalism and Incentives Inequality.Edward Andrew Greetis - forthcoming - Res Publica:1-20.
    G. A. Cohen argues that Rawls’s difference principle is incompatible with his endorsement of incentives inequality—higher pay for certain professions is just when that pay benefits everyone. Cohen concludes that Rawls must reject both incentives inequality and ‘institutionalism’—the view that egalitarian principles, including the difference principle, apply exclusively to social institutions. I argue that the premises of Cohen’s ‘internal criticism’ of Rawls require rejecting two important parts of his theory: a ‘subjective circumstance of justice’ and a ‘shared conception of justice’. (...)
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  2. Rawls y el pricipio aristótelico. Una aproximación a la idea de bien en A Theory of Justice.Pablo Aguayo Westwood - 2014 - Ideas Y Valores 156 (LVIII):129-143.
    Con la finalidad de fundamentar y reforzar su teoría de los bienes primarios, J. Rawls introduce, en el §65 de Una teoría de la justicia, la idea de “principio aristotélico”. Se discuten las dificultades que implica aceptar dicha noción, así como las limitaciones de la idea de bien que subyace en dicho principio. Se busca mostrar que la concepción de bien que Rawls presenta allí padece de “insuficiencia moral” y se defiende la tesis de que su aproximación a la idea (...)
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  3. Justice as Fairness: A Restatement.T. Metz - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (4):618-620.
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  4. Freedom, Money and Justice as Fairness.Blain Neufeld - 2017 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 16 (1):70-92.
    The first principle of Rawls’s conception of justice secures a set of ‘basic liberties’ equally for all citizens within the constitutional structure of society. The ‘worth’ of citizens’ liberties, however, may vary depending upon their wealth. Against Rawls, Cohen contends that an absence of money often can directly constrain citizens’ freedom and not simply its worth. This is because money often can remove legally enforced constraints on what citizens can do. Cohen’s argument – if modified to apply to citizens’ ‘moral (...)
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  5. Rawls and Walzer on Non-Domestic Justice.Caroline Walsh - 2007 - Contemporary Political Theory 6 (4):419-436.
    This article illuminates the relationship between John Rawls' and Michael Walzer's accounts of non-domestic justice by tracing its connection to their domestic relationship. More precisely, it places the celebrated positional shifts that characterize the latter within the context of the fundamental justificatory tension between their projects which endures: reason vs trust; and then juxtaposes this justificatory tension and their non-domestic political prescriptions. Such contextualization is important to the clarification of the pair's non-domestic relationship since it enables the observation that despite (...)
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  6. Just Democracy: The Rawls-Machiavelli Programme, by Philippe Van Parijs.Simon Thompson - 2013 - Contemporary Political Theory 12 (1):e19-e21.
  7. The Legacy of John Rawls.Thomas Porter - 2009 - Contemporary Political Theory 8 (2):237-239.
  8. John Rawls.Paul Graham - 2008 - Contemporary Political Theory 7 (4):449-451.
  9. Rawls and Left Criticism.Arthur DiQuattro - 1983 - Political Theory 11 (1):53-78.
  10. The Procedural Republic and the Unencumbered Self.Michael J. Sandel - 1984 - Political Theory 12 (1):81-96.
  11. On DiQuattro, “Rawls and Left Criticism”.Lawrence J. Connin - 1985 - Political Theory 13 (1):138-141.
  12. Rawls Versus Hayek.Arthur DiQuattro - 1986 - Political Theory 14 (2):307-310.
  13. The Original Position as Social Practice.Stephen L. Esquith & Richard T. Peterson - 1988 - Political Theory 16 (2):300-334.
  14. Is the Free Market Acceptable to Everyone?Matthew Clayton & David Stevens - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (4):363-382.
    In this paper we take issue with two central claims that John Tomasi makes in Free Market Fairness. The first claim is that Rawls’s difference principle can better be realized by free market institutions than it can be by state interventionist regimes such as property-owning democracy or liberal socialism. We argue that Tomasi’s narrow interpretation of the difference principle, which focuses largely on wealth and income, leaves other goods worryingly unsatisfied. The second claim is that a wide set of economic (...)
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  15. Self-Respect or Self-Delusion? Tomasi and Rawls on the Basic Liberties.Richard Penny - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (4):397-411.
    A central feature of John Tomasi’s ‘Free Market Fairness’ is the emphasis it places upon the good of self-respect. Like Rawls, Tomasi believes that accounts of justice ought to offer support for the self-respect of citizens. Indeed, this is a key way in which Tomasi aspires to engage with the ‘high-liberal’ tradition. Unlike Rawls however, Tomasi argues that this support is best provided by our treating a broader set of economic liberties as basic liberties. In this paper I raise two (...)
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  16. The Fair Value of Economic Liberty.Daniel Layman - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (4):413-428.
    In Free Market Fairness, John Tomasi tries to show that ‘thick’ economic liberties, including the right to own productive property, are basic liberties. According to Tomasi, the policy-level consequences of protecting economic liberty as basic are essentially libertarian in character. I argue that if economic liberties are basic, just societies must guarantee their fair value to all citizens. And in order to secure the fair value of economic liberty, states must guarantee that citizens of roughly similar dispositions and talents are (...)
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  17. Dream Capitalism.Chris Pierson - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (4):383-395.
    In my reading of Free Market Fairness, I challenge Tomasi’s key assumption that that we can and should pursue the account of social justice laid down in its essentials by John Rawls, but with this one crucial change, that the ‘economic liberties’ which Rawls excludes from his framework of basic liberties should be included on that list and be appropriately prioritized and protected. I argue that Rawls had very good grounds for excluding the right to own productive capital from his (...)
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  18. Are The Economic Liberties Basic?Alan Patten - 2014 - Critical Review 26 (3-4):362-374.
    ABSTRACTAccording to John Tomasi's Free Market Fairness, there are serious constraints on what a liberal state may do to promote economic justice. Tomasi defends this claim by arguing that important economic liberties ought to be regarded as “basic” and given special priority over other liberal concerns, including those of economic justice. I argue that Tomasi's defense of this claim is unsuccessful. One problem takes the form of a dilemma: depending on how the claim is formulated more precisely, Tomasi's argument seems (...)
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  19. A Preface to Economic Democracy.Robert H. Dahl (ed.) - 1985 - University of California Press.
    Tocqueville pessimistically predicted that liberty and equality would be incompatible ideas. Robert Dahl, author of the classic _A Preface to Democratic Theory,_ explores this alleged conflict, particularly in modern American society where differences in ownership and control of corporate enterprises create inequalities in resources among Americans that in turn generate inequality among them as citizens. Arguing that Americans have misconceived the relation between democracy, private property, and the economic order, the author contends that we can achieve a society of real (...)
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  20. Piketty, Meade and Predistribution.Martin O'Neill - forthcoming - Crooked Timber Book Seminar on Thomas Piketty, Capital in the Twenty-First Century.
    If solutions to the problem of inequality are to be as radical as reality now demands, what is instead required is a reimagining of what would be involved comprehensively to tame capitalism through democratic means. This will involve much further development of the kind of plurality of institutional and policy proposals sketched by Meade, and will involve both the private and public – individual and collective – forms of capital predistribution that Meade advocated. Piketty, like Meade, sees the need for (...)
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  21. Liberal Socialism: An Alternative Social Ideal Grounded in Rawls and Marx.Ian Hunt - 2015 - Lexington Books.
    Liberal Socialism exposes false ideas of justice behind neo-liberal capitalism and combines Rawls's ideas on justice and Marx's views on capitalism to make a plausible case for the alternative social ideal of liberal socialism. A fixed social structure gives equal weight to all competing claims for rights, liberties, and shares of the burdens and benefits of social cooperation, while allowing a democratic majority vote for liberal socialism.
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  22. Why Free Market Rights Are Not Basic Liberties.C. M. Melenovsky & Justin Bernstein - 2015 - Journal of Value Inquiry 49 (1-2):47-67.
    Most liberals agree that governments should protect certain basic liberties, such as freedom of speech, freedom of religion and freedom of the person. Liberals disagree, however, about whether free market rights should also be protected. By “free market rights,” we mean those rights typically associated with laissez-faire economic systems such as freedom of contract, a right to market returns, and claims to privately own the means of production.We do not use the phrase “economic liberties,” as Tomasi does, because it does (...)
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  23. Putting Incentives in Context: A Reply to Penny.Harrison P. Frye - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (1):93-98.
    Richard Penny argues that Rawls’s commitment to self-respect puts him at odds with his endorsement of unequalizing incentives. Penny draws on G.A. Cohen’s distinction between ‘lax’ and ‘strict’ readings of the difference principle to make this point. Given this, Penny concludes that Rawls faces a dilemma: either Rawls weakens his endorsement of unequalizing incentives or weakens his commitment to self-respect. By taking the difference principle in isolation, Penny creates a false dilemma. I will argue that once we place the difference (...)
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  24. Rawls' Theory of Justice and 'Market Socialism'.Carl G. Hedman - 1981 - Radical Philosophy 28:23.
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  25. Intergenerational Altruism and the Irrelevance of Redistribution in Rawls' Original Position.F. Woolley - 1989 - Taxation, Incentives and the Distribution of Income Programme.
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  26. Economic Liberties and the Constitution. [REVIEW]William Burt - 1982 - Reason Papers 8:101-107.
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  27. Book Review: Free Market Fairness, Written by John Tomasi. [REVIEW]Keith Hankins - 2014 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (6):769-772.
  28. Book Review: Rawls Explained: From Fairness to Utopia. [REVIEW]Rajesh Sampath - 2014 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (6):843-847.
  29. Gallican Liberties and the Catholic League.Sophie Nicholls - 2014 - History of European Ideas 40 (7):940-964.
    Theorists of Gallican liberty took as their premise the idea that France had an exceptional status amongst the national Christian churches. However, as contemporaries had noted, the precise definition of Gallican liberties remained at stake; Antoine Hotman noted in his treatise on the subject that ‘it is a strange phenomenon that everyone talks of the liberties of the Gallican Church and, most of the time, very few people know what they are and cannot account for their origins or for their (...)
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  30. Rawls, Property‐Owning Democracy, and Democratic Socialism.Tom Malleson - 2014 - Journal of Social Philosophy 45 (2):228-251.
  31. Sen on Rawls's “Transcendental Institutionalism”: An Analysis and Critique.Alan Thomas - 2014 - European Journal of Political Theory 13 (3):241-263.
    This paper evaluates Amartya Sen’s criticisms of Rawls’s theory of justice, in particular his critique of the ideal versus nonideal distinction in Rawls, and corrects what I take to be various misconceptions that underpin this critique. I will then move on to the more general issue of how we are to understand the role of the ideal versus nonideal distinction (and how we ought not to understand it) before going on to consider one focused application of Sen’s ideas. I will (...)
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  32. Rawls' Rechtvaardigheidstheorie.Percy Lehning - 1989 - Krisis 36:58-68.
  33. Towards a More Adequate Rawlsian Theory of Social Justice.Rodney G. Peffer - 1994 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 75 (3-4):251-271.
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  34. Liberty and Liberties.Philip Pettit - 2008 - In Matthew Kramer, Claire Grant, Ben Colburn & Antony Hatzistavrou (eds.), The Legacy of H.L.A. Hart: Legal, Political and Moral Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  35. Just Democracy: The Rawls-Machiavelli Programme, Van Parijs, Philippe Colchester: ECPR Press, 2011 ISBN 978-1-907301-14-8. [REVIEW]Manfred J. Holler - 2012 - Revue de Philosophie Économique 13 (2):187.
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  36. Handbook of Rational and Social Choice.Paul Anand, Prasanta Pattanaik & Clemens Puppe (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume provides an overview of issues arising in work on the foundations of decision theory and social choice. The collection will be of particular value to researchers in economics with interests in utility or welfare, but also to any social scientist or philosopher interested in theories of rationality or group decision-making.
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  37. Rawls, Equality, and Democracy.C. . . Edwin Baker - 2008 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (3):203-246.
    Part I distinguishes epistemic and choice democracy, attributing the first to the Rawls of A Theory of Justice but arguing that the second is more justifiable. Part II argues that in comparison with the difference principle, three principles — equal participation in choice democracy, no subordinating purpose, and a just wants guarantee — constitute a more rational choice in the original position; and that they better provide all the benefits claimed for the difference principle in its comparison with either average (...)
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  38. Who Owns What? An Egalitarian Interpretation of John Rawls's Idea of a Property-Owning Democracy.Thad Williamson - 2009 - Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (3):434-453.
  39. Rights and Liberties.Kalyan Sen Gupta - 1989 - In Krishna Roy & Chhanda Gupta (eds.), Essays in Social and Political Philosophy. Indian Council of Philosophical Research in Association with Allied Publishers.
  40. The Legacy of John Rawls.Michael Walzer - 2009 - Contemporary Political Theory 8 (2):237-239.
  41. A Chronological Bibliography of Works On John Rawls' Theory of Justice.Robert K. Fullinwider - 1977 - Political Theory 5 (4):561-570.
  42. Books in Review : Understanding Rawls: A Reconstruction and Critique of a Theory of Justice by Robert Paul Wolff. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1977. Pp. X, 224. $3.95 , $13.50. [REVIEW]David Miller - 1977 - Political Theory 5 (4):541-544.
  43. The “Mirage” of Social Justice: Hayek Against (and For) Rawls.Andrew Lister - 2013 - Critical Review 25 (3-4):409-444.
    There is an odd proximity between Hayek, hero of the libertarian right, and Rawls, theorist of social justice, because, at the level of principle, Hayek was in some important respects a Rawlsian. Although Hayek said that the idea of social justice was nonsense, he argued against only a particular principle of social justice, one that Rawls too rejected, namely distribution according to individual merit. Any attempt to make reward and merit coincide, Hayek argued, would undermine the market's price system, leaving (...)
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  44. Book Review: Rawls and Habermas: Reason, Pluralism and the Claims of Political Philosophy. [REVIEW]Jørgen Pedersen - 2013 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (4):569-575.
  45. Robert S. Taylor, Reconstructing Rawls: The Kantian Foundations of Justice as Fairness (University Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2011), 360 Pp. ISBN: 978-0271037714. $74.95 (Hbk.). [REVIEW]Paul Voice - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (6):799-801.
  46. A Satisfactory Minimum Conception of Justice: Reconsidering Rawls's Maximin Argument.Alexander Kaufman - 2013 - Economics and Philosophy 29 (3):349-369.
    John Rawls argues that it is possible to describe a suitably defined initial situation from which to form reliable judgements about justice. In this initial situation, rational persons are deprived of information that is . It is rational, Rawls argues, for persons choosing principles of justice from this standpoint to be guided by the maximin rule. Critics, however, argue that (i) the maximin rule is not the appropriate decision rule for Rawls's choice position; (ii) the maximin argument relies upon an (...)
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  47. Radical Liberalism, Rawls and the Welfare State: Justifying the Politics of Basic Income.Simon Birnbaum - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (4):495-516.
  48. Justice as Fairness, Civic Identity, and Patriotic Education.M. Victoria Costa - 2009 - Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (2):95-114.
    The ideal model of a just society defended by John Rawls entails the existence of certain institutions—those that form the basic structure of society—that guarantee citizens' basic rights and liberties, equality of opportunity, and access to material resources. Such a model also presupposes a certain account of reasonable citizenship. In particular, reasonable citizens will have a set of moral capacities and dispositions and will voluntarily support just institutions. According to Rawls, the need for such citizens is related to the following (...)
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  49. Are Economic Liberties Basic Rights?J. V. Platz - 2014 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 13 (1):23-44.
    In this essay I discuss a powerful challenge to high-liberalism: the challenge presented by neoclassical liberals that the high-liberal assumptions and values imply that the full range of economic liberties are basic rights. If the claim is true, then the high-liberal road from ideals of democracy and democratic citizenship to left-liberal institutions is blocked. Indeed, in that case the high-liberal is committed to an institutional scheme more along the lines of laissez-faire capitalism than property-owning democracy. To present and discuss this (...)
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  50. Rawls in France.Catherine Audard - 2002 - European Journal of Political Theory 1 (2):215-227.
    The reception of Rawls in France has been an extremely complex story where forces of innovation have been, in the end, overwhelmed by the resistance of `philosophical nationalism'. This is surprising as, in many ways, France was going through tremendous changes and modernization at the time of the translation of A Theory of Justice in 1987. In that context, Rawls's project seemed to have something useful and suggestive to offer: bridging the gap between freedom and equality in a new version (...)
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