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  1. The Problem of The Self-Ascription of Sainthood.Gorazd Andrejč - forthcoming - In Tyler McNabb & Victoria S. Harrison (eds.), Philosophy and the Spiritual Life. Oxford, UK:
    The main idea of this essay stems from a grammatical peculiarity of ‘being a saint’ in the Christian context, which can be described as follows: the term ‘saint’ seems to be ascribable only to others but not to oneself. This is because claiming for oneself that one is a saint is considered morally and spiritually inappropriate, indeed self-defeating. Does this mean that sainthood is not a real property? Not all Christians are convinced that the problem with the self-ascriptions of sainthood (...)
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  2. Norming COVID‐19: The Urgency of a Non‐Humanist Holism.Jeffrey P. Bishop & Martin J. Fitzgerald - forthcoming - Heythrop Journal.
  3. Can a Worship-Worthy Agent Command Others to Worship It?Frederick Choo - forthcoming - Religious Studies.
    This article examines two arguments that a worship-worthy agent cannot command worship. The first argument is based on the idea that any agent who commands worship is egotistical, and hence not worship-worthy. The second argument is based on Campbell Brown and Yujin Nagasawa's (2005) idea that people cannot comply with the command to worship because if people are offering genuine worship, they cannot be motivated by a command to do so. One might then argue that a worship-worthy agent would have (...)
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  4. Rawls Goes to Church.Bob Fischer - forthcoming - Theologica.
    Many mainline Protestant communities want to be welcoming while preserving their identities; they want to be shaped by the central claims of the faith while making room for those who doubt. And crucially, they want to do this in a way that leads to vibrant, growing communities, where more and more people gather to worship, encourage one another, and live out the Gospel. How should the Episcopal Church—and other mainline Protestant denominations, insofar as they’re similar—try to achieve these goals? I (...)
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  5. Responses to Divine Communication.Octavian Gabor - forthcoming - Philosophy and Theology.
    Sophocles’s Oedipus Tyrannus shows that humans' problems do not appear when they listen to the gods, but when they listen to themselves imagining that they follow the gods. Instead of placing themselves in the service of the god, as Socrates does in Plato’s Apology, they only think that they follow the divinity, while they actually act according to their own understanding. If Sophocles’s play is a synopsis of this danger, Plato’s dialogue proposes a different attitude before divinity: instead of interpreting (...)
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  6. The Cinematic Gaze as ‘A Long Loving Look at the Real’: Andrei Tarkovsky and Walter Burghardt’s Theology of Contemplation.James Lorenz - forthcoming - Heythrop Journal.
  7. Philosophy and the Spiritual Life.Tyler McNabb & Victoria S. Harrison - forthcoming - Oxford, UK: Routledge.
    Spirituality has become a focus of academic interest within a range of disciplines, including theology, religious studies, psychology and anthropology. Philosophers of religion have, however, typically given the topic of spirituality scant attention. This volume fills this important gap in the field. The volume consists of three main parts: Spiritual practice and philosophical understanding; The spiritual life and being; and Philosophical problems with the spiritual life. The first part contains chapters that are united by discussion of whether or not the (...)
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  8. The Multidimensional Unity of Life, Theology, Ecology, and COVID-19.Derek A. Michaud - forthcoming - In Alexander J. B. Hampton (ed.), Pandemic, Ecology and Theology Perspectives on COVID-19. Routledge.
  9. Faith Without Hope is Dead: Moral Arguments and the Theological Virtues.Rory Lawrence Phillips - forthcoming - Religious Studies.
    It is well-known that Kant defends a conception of God and the final end of our moral striving, called the highest good. In this article, I outline Kant's argument for why we ought to have faith in God and hope for the highest good, and argue that the Kantian argument can be extended in such a way as to show the unity of the theological virtues. This feature of the Kantian account can then have ramifications in further questions regarding the (...)
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  10. Schizophrenia or Possession? A Reply to Kemal Irmak and Nuray Karanci.Anastasia Philippa Scrutton - forthcoming - Journal of Religion and Health.
    A recent paper in this journal argues that some cases of schizophrenia should be seen as cases of demon possession and treated by faith healers. A reply, also published in this journal, responds by raising concerns about the intellectual credibility and potentially harmful practical implications of demon possession beliefs. My paper contributes to the discussion, arguing that a critique of demon possession beliefs in the context of schizophrenia is needed, but suggesting an alternative basis for it. It also reflects on (...)
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  11. The T&T Clark Handbook of Analytic Theology.James Arcadi & James T. Turner Jr (eds.) - 2021 - T&T Clark/Bloomsbury.
  12. Happiness and Mental Illness: Virtue Ethics in Dialogue with Psychology.Shane Clifton & Bruce Stevens - 2021 - Heythrop Journal 62 (3):546-559.
  13. Mysticism Without Concepts.Sebastian Gäb - 2021 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 89:1-14.
    It has often been claimed, e.g. by William James or Aldous Huxley, that mystical experiences across times and cultures exhibit a striking similarity. Even though the words and images we use to describe them are different, underneath the surface we find a common experiential core. Others have rejected this claim and argued that all experiences are intrinsically shaped by the mystics’ pre-existing religious concepts. Against these constructivist objections, I defend the idea of a common core by arguing that even if (...)
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  14. Thomas Macho: Das Leben nehmen – Suizid in der Moderne, Berlin: Suhrkamp Verlag 2017, 531 S.Martin Arndt - 2020 - Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 72 (2):231-233.
  15. The Failure of the Sacraments in Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner.Joshua Avery - 2020 - Renascence 72 (2):87-98.
    This essay argues that Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner represents in its imagery a tension within Coleridge prior to his conversion to Anglicanism. Specifically, the poem’s treatment of institutional sacraments argues for their apparent inefficacy, at least from the Mariner’s vantage point. The sacramental idea upheld by a High Church view would suggest that particular earthly institutions, such as Holy Communion or matrimony, could function as actual and not merely symbolic vehicles of divine grace. The Rime, however, displays a (...)
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  16. It is Not Inevitable: The Future Funding of Faith-Based Schools After Ruddock.Renae Barker - 2020 - The Australasian Catholic Record 97 (2):144.
    The current public debate about the role and place of religion in Australia's education system feels very much like deja vu. The Religious Freedom Review2 may be new, but we've been here before. Religious schools have regularly been at the forefront of the evolving relationship between the state and religion in Australia, from the creation and collapse of the Church and Schools Corporation in the 1830s, and the implementation of the dual board system in the 1840s, to the removal of (...)
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  17. Review of T.J. Mawson's Monotheism and the Meaning of LIfe. [REVIEW]Brian C. Barnett - 2020 - Religious Studies Review 46 (2):215.
    This review provides a brief summary and analysis of T.J. Mawson's monograph, Monotheism and the Meaning of Life (part of the Cambridge Elements series, edited by Chad Meister and Paul Moser).
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  18. From Good News to Gospel: What Did the First Christians Say About Jesus? By David Wenham. Pp. Xx, 124, Grand Rapids, Eerdmans, 2018, $16.00. [REVIEW]Michael Bradley - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (4):701-702.
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  19. Reaching Across The ‘Deepest Divide’: Moral Acquaintanceship, Religion, And Bioethics.Abram Brummett - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (4):677-688.
  20. God’s Spies: Michelangelo, Shakespeare and Other Poets of Vision. By Paul Murray O.P. Pp. Ix, 178, London, T&T Clark, 2019, £30.91. [REVIEW]Francesca Bugliani Knox - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):556-557.
  21. Personhood and Creation in an Age of Robots and Ai: Can We Say “You” to Artifacts?Michael S. Burdett - 2020 - Zygon 55 (2):347-360.
    This article explores the extent to which the I‐You relation should be applied to domains other than the human and the divine focusing particularly on artifacts and technology. Drawing first on the work of Martin Buber, Gabriel Marcel, and Martin Heidegger, I contend that the I‐You tradition has maintained I‐You relations with objects are possible even when these same figures level strong critiques of the I‐It relation. I extend these discussions and argue that some kind of You‐speaking for artifacts is (...)
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  22. Narrative philosophy of religion: apologetic and pluralistic orientations.Mikel Burley - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (1):5-21.
    Recent decades have witnessed a growing interest in narrative both in certain areas of philosophy and in the study of religion. The philosophy of religion has not itself been at the forefront of this narrative turn, but exceptions exist—most notably Eleonore Stump’s work on biblical stories and the problem of suffering. Characterizing Stump’s approach as an apologetic orientation, this article contrasts it with pluralistic orientations that, rather than seeking to defend religious faith, are concerned with doing conceptual justice to the (...)
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  23. How the Classics Made Shakespeare. By Jonathan Bate. Pp. Xiv, 361, Princeton University Press, 2019, $24.95.Andrea Campana - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):532-535.
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  24. Shakespeare and the Fall of the Roman Empire: Selfhood, Stoicism and Civil War. By Patrick Gray. Pp. Xii, 308, Edinburgh, Edinburgh University Press, 2019, £80.00. [REVIEW]Andrea Campana - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):546-546.
  25. Shakespeare’s Library: Unlocking the Greatest Mystery in Literature. By Stuart Kells. Pp. 322, Counterpoint, 2018, $26.00. [REVIEW]Andrea Campana - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):536-536.
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  26. Shakespeare on the Record: Researching an Early Modern Life. Edited by Hannah Leah Crummé. Pp. 264, The Arden Shakespeare, 2019, $110 Hardback; EPUB Ebook, $99; PDF Ebook, $99. [REVIEW]Andrea Campana - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):541-543.
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  27. The English People at War in the Age of Henry VIII. By Steven Gunn. Pp. 304, Oxford University Press, 2018 (Hardcover), $47.95. [REVIEW]Andrea Campana - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):546-547.
  28. God in Himself: Scripture, Metaphysics, and the Task of Christian Theology by Steven J.Duby (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press Academic, 2019), Xviii + 334 Pp. [REVIEW]Anne M. Carpenter - 2020 - Modern Theology 36 (3):684-686.
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  29. The Sovereignty of the World: Towards a Political Theology of Modernity (After Blumenberg).Kirill Chepurin & Joseph Albernaz - 2020 - In Agata Bielik-Robson & Daniel Whistler (eds.), Interrogating Modernity: Debates with Hans Blumenberg. London: pp. 83-107.
    Reading with and against Blumenberg’s The Legitimacy of the Modern Age, and following his own account of the epochal shift from the Middle Ages to modernity, this chapter takes up the genealogy and the political theology of Blumenbergian modernity so as to reanimate its relevance for contemporary theory. Beginning with the shared opposition to Gnosticism found in both Christianity and modernity, we trace the emergence of modernity as creating a “counterworld” of possibility in the face of the alienation engendered by (...)
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  30. Inner Animalities: Theology and the End of the Human by Eric DarylMeyer (New York, NY: Fordham University Press, 2018), + 228 Pp. [REVIEW]David L. Clough - 2020 - Modern Theology 36 (3):682-684.
  31. Personal and Non-Personal Worship.Joshua Cockayne - 2020 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 12 (1):1.
    Is it possible to worship a non-personal God? According to some, the answer is no: worship necessarily involves addressing the object of one’s worship. Since non-personal gods cannot acknowledge or respond to address, it must be conceptually inappropriate to worship such gods. I object to this argument on two fronts. First, I show that the concept of worship used is too narrow, excluding many cases that obviously count as instances of worship. And, secondly, drawing on recent work on the philosophy (...)
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  32. Suffering and the Christian Life, Edited by KarenKilby and RachelDavies (London: T&T Clark, 2020), 212 Pp. [REVIEW]Niamh Colbrook - 2020 - Modern Theology 36 (4):910-913.
  33. The Curious Case of the Priest Who Had Lost His Faculties.John Ormerod Collins - 2020 - The Australasian Catholic Record 97 (2):206.
    With greater sensitivity to the issues around sexual abuse, and keen to minimise potential pastoral damage and legal exposure, the church is finding an increasing number of ordained men unable to operate in pastoral ministry, on leave or with suspended faculties. However, the problem is not restricted to just criminal matters. The continuing shortage of vocations to the priesthood has led to an increasing willingness to overlook other personality issues that are serious impediments to the ability of newly ordained priests (...)
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  34. Shakespeare’s Ovid and the Spectre of the Medieval. By Lindsay Ann Reid. Pp. Xiii, 267, Cambridge, D.S. Brewer, 2018, £60.00. [REVIEW]Michael J. Collins - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):531-532.
  35. Do the Interactions Between Astronomy and Religion, Beginning in Prehistory, Form a Distinct Religious Tradition? Cometan - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Central Lancashire
    Astronomy and religion have long been intertwined with their interactions resembling a symbiotic relationship since prehistoric times. Building on existing archaeological research, this study asks: do the interactions between astronomy and religion, beginning from prehistory, form a distinct religious tradition? Prior research exploring the prehistoric origins of religion has unearthed evidence suggesting the influence of star worship and night sky observation in the development of religious sects, beliefs and practices. However, there does not yet exist a historiography dedicated to outlining (...)
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  36. Editor's Page.John E. Curran - 2020 - Renascence 72 (2):65-65.
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  37. Of Danger and Difficulty: Rowan Williams and ‘The Tragic Imagination’.Khegan Delport - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):505-520.
  38. Politics of Shame in Turkey: Public Shaming and Mourning.Zeynep Direk - 2020 - Sophia 59 (1):39-56.
    The politics of shame makes part of the politics of affects. It is becoming a prominent form of politics in the age of social media. Social media, insofar as it presents a plurality of perspectives, can be a milieu for public deliberation. Acknowledging that politics of shame can be of different types, this essay considers two different experiences of politics of shame in social media. It compares public shaming as an activist strategy of moral reform in contemporary feminist politics with (...)
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  39. Cicero and the Sermon: Further Reflections on the Art of Preaching.Geoffrey D. Dunn - 2020 - The Australasian Catholic Record 97 (1):45.
    As my time writing scripture reflections for this journal has drawn to an end, it is a good opportunity to reflect more theoretically about the nature of homiletic preaching today. My first peer-reviewed publication was on this topic. Since then I have returned on occasion to investigate preaching in the early Christian centuries both on its own terms qua preaching and as source material for theological expression. It is a matter worthy of fresh reflection, because in the twenty years since (...)
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  40. A Profound Ignorance: Modern Pneumatology and Its Anti‐Modern Redemption by EphraimRadner (Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2019), Ix + 453 Pp. [REVIEW]Amy J. Erickson - 2020 - Modern Theology 36 (4):919-922.
  41. Persons Are the Only Creatures: Non‐Naturalism in the Bible.Mark Glouberman - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (6):951-963.
  42. John-Mark L. Miravalle: God, existence, and fictional objects: the case for meinongian theism: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018, 186 pp, $102.60.Tyron Goldschmidt - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (1):131-134.
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  43. Editorial preface.R. L. Hall - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (1):1-3.
  44. Ricoeur’s Hermeneutics of Religion: Rebirth of the Capable Self by BrianGregor (Lanham, MD: Roman & Littlefield, 2018), Xvi + 240 Pp. [REVIEW]Timo Helenius - 2020 - Modern Theology 36 (3):677-679.
  45. Some Reflections on Clericalism.John Hill - 2020 - The Australasian Catholic Record 97 (2):172.
    I intend, in this article, to outline an argument against the indiscriminate use of the word, 'clericalism'. I do not dispute that something answering to the word does exist, but I argue that it should be used more carefully; that we should aim for a reasonable precision in its use, avoiding confusion between connotation and denotation,1 on the one hand, and between the condition itself and its manifestations, on the other. It is with the last consideration that I begin.
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  46. Euthanasia and the Sacred.Michael Kelly - 2020 - The Australasian Catholic Record 97 (1):74.
    For euthanasia the case is deceptively easy to make. When the suffering of others is ended by death we often feel relief. Commonly we accept that animals must sometimes, as the saying goes, be 'put out of their misery'. And, while most people who advocate euthanasia do not rely simply on our revulsion from suffering as though there were no other considerations, the public appeal of their view probably does rest largely on it.
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  47. Seeing and Not Seeing the Face of God: Overcoming the Law of Contradiction in Biblical Theology.Steven Kepnes - 2020 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 12 (2):133-147.
    This paper attempts to illuminate and interpret the contradictory portrait of God as both seen and unseen in the Torah. Thus Moses is commanded not to look on the face of God yet also praised for having spoken to God “face to face". We seek ways to reconcile the contradictory portraits of God through the use of the term “doubled-mindedness” in the theology of Jerome Gellman, in the logic of “thirdness” in C.S. Peirce’s semiotics, and in the use of both (...)
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  48. Friendship and Synodality: An Ecclesiological Suggestion on the Eve of the Australian Plenary Council 2020.Joseph Lam - 2020 - The Australasian Catholic Record 97 (2):156.
    Since Pope John Paul II's visit to Australia, in 1986, the face of the Australian Catholic Church has changed dramatically. The once celebrated 'comfortableness at calling themselves Catholics', has given way to shame and calamity caused by hundreds of moral and sexual misconduct cases. The Australian Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse not only challenges the church's governance. It also questions certain practical aspects of ecclesiology, for example, the priestly celibacy or the seal of confession that might (...)
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  49. A Priesthood Imprisoned: A Crisis for the Church [Book Review].Richard Lennan - 2020 - The Australasian Catholic Record 97 (2):254.
    Review(s) of: A priesthood imprisoned: A crisis for the church, by John E. Ryan, (Bayswater, VIC, Coventry Press, 2017), pp. 126, $24.95.
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  50. Eloquium Prophetarum. Prophecies and Future Contingents in William of Ockham, Walter Chatton and Richard Kilvington.Roberto Limonta & Riccardo Fedriga - 2020 - In Alessandro Palazzo & Anna Rodolfi (eds.), Micrologus Library. Firenze FI, Italia: pp. 235-255.
    In the historiographical tradition on the medieval theories of future contingents, William of Ockham’s position is considered as the standard view in the fourteenth century debates on prophecies. If it is indisputable that the theory exposed in the Tractatus de predestinatione et de praescientia Dei respectu futurorum contingentium had a pivotal role in the discussions about divine foreknowledge and its relation to human will, the analysis of some positions of the Oxonian context, such as those of Walter Chatton and Richard (...)
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1 — 50 / 227