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  1. Stephen Asma (2005). The Gods Drink Whiskey: Stumbling Toward Enlightenment in the Land of the Tattered Buddha. Harper Collins.
    Asma, a professor of Buddhism at Columbia College in Chicago and the author of Stuffed Animals and Pickled Heads (2001), recounts his intense and revelatory Cambodian adventures while teaching at Phnom Penh's Buddhist Institute. In an electrifying and frank mix of hair-raising anecdotes and expert analysis, he explicates the vast difference between text-based Buddhist teachings and daily life in a poor and politically volatile Buddhist society. Amid tales of massage parlors, marijuana-spiced pizza, and bloodshed, he cogently explains how Theravada Buddhism, (...)
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  2. Piotr Augustyniak (2011). Bóg Mistrza Eckharta wobec Nietzscheańskiej krytyki chrześcijaństwa. Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 1 (2):211-224.
    English title: Master Eckhart’s God Confronted with Nietzschean Critique of Christianity. Author tries to demonstrate that the way of thinking about Christian God developed in the late Middle Ages by Master Eckhart goes beyond the interpretation which underlies Nietzsche’s criticism of Christianity as a religion of the other world. In the paper, Author first presents the said criticism, followed by the vision of God outlined by Eckhart. He demonstrates that Christianity, criticized by Nietzsche, uses a commonsense vision of God’s transcendence (...)
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  3. Brian Besong (2015). Reappraising the Manual Tradition. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 89 (4):557-584.
    Following the Second Vatican Council, the predominant trend in Catholic moral theology has been decidedly antagonistic toward the tradition that dominated moral theology before the Council, namely the use and formulation of ecclesiastically-approved “manuals” or “handbooks” of moral theology, the contents of which chiefly involved general precepts of morally good and bad behavior as well as the extension of those precepts to particular cases. In this paper, I will oppose the dominant anti-manual trend. More particularly, I will first sketch what (...)
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  4. A. Brunneis (2015). The Boulevards of Extinction. Wipf & Stock.
    In over 600 aphorisms, essays, parables, and dialogues, the author attempts to engage the long tradition of modern literary philosophy. Though richly represented by a host of notable figures—Montaigne, Pascal, Voltaire, the Jena Circle, Kierkegaard, Emerson, Nietzsche, and Cioran, to name a few—this style of thinking has fallen into abeyance since the mid-twentieth century. It is hoped that this book will play a small role in helping to reinvigorate the genre. Inspired by the work of Joshua Foa Dienstag, the author (...)
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  5. Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug (2005). Escaping Hell: Divine Motivation and the Problem of Hell. Religious Studies 41 (1):39-54.
    We argue that it is most rational for God, given God's character and policies, to adopt an open-door policy towards those in hell – making it possible for those in hell to escape. We argue that such a policy towards the residents of hell should issue from God's character and motivational states. In particular, God's parental love ought to motivate God to extend the provision for reconciliation with Him for an infinite amount of time.
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  6. Subhasis Chattopadhyay (2009 (?)). On St. Ignatius of Loyola and the Clinical Condition of Depression From a Hindu Perspective. Dissertation, For Formative Spirituality
    This is a Hindu reading of St. Ignatius of Loyola's Spiritual Exercises for passing an examination. This is not the final dissertation but only a draft which underwent many changes. It is unpublished.
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  7. Jäger Christoph (2016). Glaube, Wissen und rationales Hoffen. In Geschichte - Gesellschaft - Geltung: XXIII Deutscher Kongress für Philosophie, 28. September -- 2. Oktober 2014 an der Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Kolloquienbeiträge, ed. Michael Quante, Hamburg, Felix Meiner: 2016. pp. 501-517.
    Discussing two accounts of rational religious faith suggested by Peter Rohs and Volker Gerhardt, the paper critically explores the relation between (i) faith and knowledge and (ii) faith and hope. It argues that, if faith essentially involves some form of eschatological hope, then an account of rational faith ought to incorporate an analysis of rational hope.
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  8. Fred Dallmayr (2012). A Secular Age? Reflections on Taylor and Panikkar. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 71 (3):189-204.
    During the last few years two major volumes have been published, both greatly revised versions of earlier Gifford Lectures: Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age ( 2007 ) and Raimon Panikkar’s The Rhythm of Being ( 2010 ). The two volumes are similar in some respects and very dissimilar in others. Both thinkers complain about the glaring blemishes of the modern, especially the contemporary age; both deplore above all a certain deficit of religiosity. The two authors differ, however, both in the (...)
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  9. Raf De Clercq & Paul Cortois (2002). Autographic and Allographic Aspects of Ritual. Philosophia 29 (1-4):133-147.
    This paper continues Israel Scheffler's investigation of rituals as autographic/allographic. It concludes that the autographic/allographic distinction is more fruitfully applied to rituals as a gradual distinction, distinguishing rituals in terms of their autographic/allographic elements or aspects.
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  10. John Dewey (1893). The Superstition of Necessity. The Monist 3 (3):362-379.
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  11. Kenneth J. Doka (2008). Religious and Spiritual Perspectives on Life-Threatening Illness, Dying, and Death. In James L. Werth & Dean Blevins (eds.), Decision Making Near the End of Life: Issues, Development, and Future Directions. Brunner-Routledge.
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  12. Einar Duenger Bohn (forthcoming). The Logic of the Trinity. Sophia.
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  13. Eduardo Duque (2014). Mudanças Culturais, Mudanças Religiosas. Humus.
    O fenómeno religioso tem sido, ao longo dos tempos, objecto de particular atenção. Foi sendo redefinido perante as suas circunstâncias históricas e socioculturais. Parece ter sobrevivido aos diversos anúncios do seu desaparecimento, anunciados tanto pela via da alienação intelectual (Comte) e antropológica (Feuerbach), como psíquica (Freud) e socioeconómica (Marx). Todavia, é inegável que a modernidade, com a sua consequente individualização social, deixou e continua a deixar marcas de uma progressiva secularização da sociedade. Tal facto conduz a um progressivo desgaste dos (...)
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  14. William V. Dych (1998). Karl Rahner's Theology of Eucharist. Philosophy and Theology 11 (1):125-146.
    The first part of this paper presents the mystery of Eucharist as the symbol or sacrament of, and hence as identical with, the central mystery of Christian faith: the paschal mystery of the life, death and resurrection of Jesus. It also situates Rahner’s theology of Eucharist within the larger context of his theology as a whole, particularly his Christology. The humanity of Jesus as the real symbol or sacrament of the Logos provides the prime analogate for understanding Eucharist as sacrament, (...)
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  15. Shawn Floyd (2006). Achieving a Science of Sacred Doctrine. Heythrop Journal 47 (1):1–15.
    Aquinas claims that sacred doctrine is a science, or scientia. All scientiae involve demonstrations containing principles which yield conclusions that are necessary and certain. The principles leading to sacred scientia are the articles of faith. Those articles are contained in Scripture and constitute the premises of demonstrations the conclusions of which form sacred doctrine's content. Because of those articles' divine origin, we can expect them to yield conclusions the truth of which is guaranteed. According to William Abraham, however, Aquinas must (...)
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  16. Vacariu Gabriel, (2015) God Cannot Even Exist.
    We have to change our oldest paradigm of thinking about the existence of the “world” and God. In our books and articles, we have showed that the “world”/”universe” does not exist but “epistemologically different worlds” (EDWs) exist/are. Within the EDWs, God cannot exist because of this reason: God cannot exist in all EDWs since one EW does not exist for all EDWs. If God were present in all EDWs, then there would be a strong ontological contradiction: any part of God (...)
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  17. Jaco Gericke (2012). The Hebrew Bible and Philosophy of Religion. Society of Biblical Literature.
    This study pioneers the use of philosophy of religion in the study of the Hebrew Bible. After identifying the need for a legitimate philosophical approach to Israelite religion, the volume traces the history of interdisciplinary relations and shows how descriptive varieties of philosophy of religion can aid the clarification of the Hebrew Bible’s own metaphysical, epistemological, and moral assumptions. Two new interpretative methodologies are developed and subsequently applied through an introduction to what the biblical texts took for granted about the (...)
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  18. Daniel Howard-Snyder (2015). Panmetaphoricism. Religious Studies:1-25.
    Panmetaphoricism is the view that our speech about God can only be metaphorical. In this essay, I do not assess the reasons that have been given for the view. Rather, I assess the view itself. My aim is to develop the most plausible version of panmetaphoricism in order to gain a clear view of the God it offers for our consideration.
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  19. Daniel Howard-Snyder (2008). The Puzzle of Prayers of Thanksgiving and Praise. In Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    in eds. Yujin Nagasawa and Erik Wielenberg, New Waves in Philosophy of Religion (Palgrave MacMillan 2008).
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  20. Daniel Howard-Snyder & Frances Howard-Snyder (2010). The Puzzle of Petitionary Prayer. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 2 (2):43-68.
    The fact that our asking God to do something can make a difference to what he does underwrites the point of petitionary prayer. Here, however, a puzzle arises: Either doing what we ask is the best God can do or it is not. If it is, then our asking won’t make any difference to whether he does it. If it is not, then our asking won’t make any difference to whether he does it. So, our asking won’t make any difference (...)
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  21. Lester Hunt & Noel Carroll (eds.) (2008). The Twilight Zone and Philosophy. Blackwell.
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  22. D'Oleo-Ochoa Isaias (2016). N.T. Wright and the Body-Soul Predicament: The Presumption of Duality in Ontological Holism. Stromata 58 (1):111-136.
    N.T. Wright has offered Christian philosophers a proposal where it is apparently possible to hold the belief in the intermediate state-resurrection of the body and an ontological holism in the same sense at the same time. I argue that this not only creates a basic contradiction in Wright’s ontological paradigm, but also it is not a coherent and tenable proposal despite the fact one might eventually find a potential solution to such a quandary.
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  23. Roomet Jakapi (2007). Christian Mysteries and Berkeley's Alleged Non-Cognitivism. In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Reexamining Berkeley's Philosophy.
  24. Greg Janzen (2013). Consciousness and the Nonexistence of God. Journal of Philosophical Research 38:1-25.
    According to the Judeo-Christian-Islamic theological tradition, or "classical theism," disembodiment (or non-physicality) and psychologicality are two of God’s necessary or essential attributes. This paper mounts a case for the thesis that these attributes are incompatible. More exactly, it provides compelling evidentiary support for the claim that, given the basic structure of consciousness, it is impossible for a psychological being to be disembodied (and vice versa). But if it is impossible for a psychological being to be disembodied (and vice versa), then, (...)
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  25. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Phenomenology, Naturalism, and Religious Experience. In Alasdair Coles & Fraser Watts (eds.), Religion and Neurology. Cambridge University Press.
    Contemporary philosophical debates about the competing merits of neurological and phenomenological approaches to understanding both psychiatric illness and religious experience—and, indeed, the relationship, if any, between psychiatric illness and religious experience. In this chapter, I propose that both psychiatric illness and religious experiences - at least in some of their diverse forms - are best understood phenomenologically in terms of radical changes in a person's 'existential feelings', in the sense articulated by Matthew Ratcliffe. If so, explanatory priority should be assigned (...)
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  26. Ian James Kidd & Guy Bennett-Hunter (eds.) (2012). Mystery and Humility. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    This guest-edited special section explores the related themes of mystery, humility, and religious practice from both the Western and East Asian philosophical traditions. The contributors are David E. Cooper, John Cottingham, Mark Wynn, Graham Parkes, and Ian James Kidd.
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  27. Jonathan Kvanvig, Heaven and Hell.
    Philosophical reflection concerning heaven and hell has focused on the place of such doctrines in the great monotheistic religions emanating from the religion of the ancient people of Israel--Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. The philosophical issues that arise concerning these doctrines is not limited to such traditions, however. Consider, for example, the doctrine of hell. Any religion promises certain benefits to its adherents, and these benefits require some contrast that befalls, or might befall, those who fail to adhere to the religion (...)
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  28. J. Linehan (1959). Modern Science and the Proof From Motion of the Existence of a Theistic God. Franciscan Studies 19 (1-2):128-141.
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  29. Jacqueline Mariña (2010). Holiness. In Charles Taliaferro, Paul Draper & Phil Quinn (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Religion. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This essay analyzes the category of “the holy” as developed by Rudolf Otto, examining his division of the holy into rational and non-rational elements. While rational elements of the holy are closely tied to ethics, another aspect of the holy can only be apprehended through sui generis feelings irreducible to other mental states. But how do non-rational elements relate to rational, ethical categories? I trace the distinction between rational and non-rational elements in Otto’s analysis to Kant’s two faculty psychology: the (...)
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  30. Jacqueline Marina (2005). Introduction. In Jacqueline Mariña (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Friedrich Schleiermacher. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    This is my introduction as editor to The Cambridge Companion to Schleiermacher.
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  31. Michael N. Marsh (2010). Out-of-Body and Near-Death Experiences: Brain-State Phenomena or Glimpses of Immortality? Oxford University Press.
    Discrediting 'mystical' or 'psychical' interpretations of out-of-body and near-death experiences, Michael Marsh demonstrates how these phenomena are explicable in terms of brain neurophysiology and its neuropathological disturbances, and discusses the theological and philosophical implications of his hypotheses.
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  32. John McAteer (2009). Review of Matthew C. Halteman's Compassionate Eating as Care of Creation (Humane Society of the United States, 2008). [REVIEW] Between the Species 13 (9):9.
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  33. Daniel J. McKaughan (2015). Religious Violence. In Graham Oppy (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Philosophy of Religion,. Routledge.
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  34. Daniel J. McKaughan (2015). Hope. In Robert Audi (ed.), The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 3rd ed. Cambridge University Press.
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  35. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). God’s Role in a Meaningful Life: New Reflections From Tim Mawson. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 10.
    A critical notice of Tim Mawson's _God and the Meaning of Life_ (Bloomsbury 2016), with a reply from the author.
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  36. Derek Michaud (2013). Personal Identity and Resurrection: How Do We Survive Our Death? Edited by Georg Gasser . Pp. Xvi, 277, Farnham, Ashgate, 2010, £55.00/$99.95. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (2):330-331.
    Book review of Georg Gasser, ed. “Personal Identity: How do we Survive Our Death?” (Ashgate, 2010).
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  37. Derek Michaud (2003). Chaos and Tehomophobia. Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory 4 (3):115-117.
    Review of Catherine Keller’s the Face of the Deep (Routledge, 2002).
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  38. Christian Miller (2016). On Shermer On Morality. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences:63-68.
    This paper is part of a six paper exchange with Michael Shermer. This is my critical commentary on Michael Shermer's paper “Morality is real, objective, and natural.” Shermer and I agree that morality is both real and objective. Here I raise serious reservations about both Shermer's account of where morality comes from and his account of what morality tells us to do. His approach to the foundations of morality would allow some very disturbing behaviors to count as moral, and his (...)
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  39. Christian Miller (2016). Morality is Real, Objective, and Supernatural. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences:74-82.
    This paper is part of a six paper exchange with Michael Shermer. Section one explains how “God” is meant to be understood. Section two then introduces the position that morality depends in some way upon God. Section three turns to some of the leading arguments for this view. Finally, we will conclude with the most powerful challenge to this approach, namely what has come to be called the Euthyphro Dilemma.
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  40. Christian Miller (2012). Atheism and the Benefits of Theistic Belief. In Jonathan Kvanvig (ed.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. pp. 97-125.
    Most atheists are error theorists about theists; they claim that theists have genuine beliefs about the existence and nature of a divine being, but as a matter of fact no such divine being exists. Thus on their view the relevant theistic beliefs are mistaken. As error theorists, then, atheists need to arrive at some answer to the question of what practical course of action the atheist should adopt towards the theistic beliefs held by committed theists. The most natural answer and (...)
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  41. Christian Miller (2009). Divine Desire Theory and Obligation. In Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 105--24.
    Thanks largely to the work of Robert Adams and Philip Quinn, the second half of the twentieth century witnessed a resurgence of interest in divine command theory as a viable position in normative theory and meta-ethics. More recently, however, there has been some dissatisfaction with divine command theory even among those philosophers who claim that normative properties are grounded in God, and as a result alternative views have begun to emerge, most notably divine intention theory (Murphy, Quinn) and divine motivation (...)
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  42. Christian Miller (2009). Divine Will Theory: Desires or Intentions? In Jonathan Kvanvig (ed.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press.
    Due largely to the work of Mark Murphy and Philip Quinn, divine will theory has emerged as a legitimate alternative to divine command theory in recent years. As an initial characterization, divine will theory is a view of deontological properties according to which, for instance, an agent S‟s obligation to perform action A in circumstances C is grounded in God‟s will that S A in C. Characterized this abstractly, divine will theory does not specify which kind of mental state is (...)
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  43. Adam Omelianchuk (2011). Ontologically Grounded Subordination: A Reply to Steven B. Cowan. Philosophia Christi 13 (1):169-80.
    In a recent article Steven Cowan defended the claim that female subordination and male authority are merely functional differences. Drawing insights from Natural Law, I argue that complementarianism typically speaks of these as proper functions of male and female designs, thus making men and women metaphysically unequal in being. Furthermore, I maintain that the function "serving as a means to an end" is less valuable than the function "having the authority to direct the end." Hence, Cowan fails to defeat the (...)
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  44. Graham Oppy (2011). New Atheism' Versus 'Christian Nationalism. In Paolo Bubbio & Philip Quadrio (eds.), The Relationship of Philosophy to Religion Today. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 118-53.
    A discussion of the recent prominence of 'new atheism' and 'Christian nationalism' in the United States.
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  45. Graham Oppy (2011). Perfection, Near-Perfection, Maximality, and Anselmian Theism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (2):119-138.
    Anselmian theists claim (a) that there is a being than which none greater can be conceived; and (b) that it is knowable on purely—solely, entirely—a priori grounds that there is a being than which none greater can be conceived. In this paper, I argue that Anselmian Theism gains traction by conflating different interpretations of the key description ‘being than which no greater can be conceived’. In particular, I insist that it is very important to distinguish between ideal excellence and maximal (...)
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  46. Richard Oxenberg, For Gabriel, on Holiness (a Passover Letter to My 7-Year-Old Son).
    I was inspired to write this letter by something my 7-year old said about the meaning of holiness. In it I reflect on this meaning, in language and terms a 7-year-old might understand and appreciate.
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  47. Richard Oxenberg, Love and Death in the First Epistle of John: A Phenomenological Reflection.
    “Whoever does not love abides in death,” writes John in his first epistle (1Jn 3:10). This statement presents us with a paradox. Death, so we suppose, is precisely that in which one cannot 'abide.' Our first thought is to interpret this as metaphor. John is saying that a life devoid of love is a life somehow like death. But, having never died, how do we know what death is like? My paper explores these questions with the aid of two philosophical (...)
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  48. Timothy Pawl (2016). Brian Hebblethwaite's Arguments Against Multiple Incarnations. Religious Studies 52 (1):117-130.
    In this article I present two arguments from Brian Hebblethwaite for the conclusion that multiple incarnations are impossible, as well as the analyses of those arguments provided by three other thinkers: Oliver Crisp, Peter Kevern, and Robin Le Poidevin. I argue that both of Hebblethwaite's arguments are unsound.
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  49. Brian Ribeiro (2009). Montaigne on Witches and the Authority of Religion in the Public Sphere. Philosophy and Literature 33 (2):pp. 235-251.
    While contemporary readers may find what appear to be appealing streaks of liberalism in Montaigne's 'Essays', I argue that a more careful analysis suggests that Montaigne's overall stance is quietistic and conservative. To help support this claim I offer a close reading of 'Essays' III.11 ("Of Cripples"), where Montaigne offers his famous critique of the witch trials of early modern Europe. Once Montaigne's objections to the witch trials are properly understood, we see that Montaigne did not seriously or consistently dispute (...)
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  50. James F. Ross (1961). Analogy as a Rule of Meaning for Religious Language. International Philosophical Quarterly 1 (3):468-502.
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