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4641 found
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  1. Descartes's Method of Doubt.Leslie Allan - manuscript
    Enlightenment philosopher, René Descartes, set out to establish what could be known with certainty, untainted by a deceiving demon. With his method of doubt, he rejected all previous beliefs, allowing only those that survived rigorous scrutiny. In this essay, Leslie Allan examines whether Descartes's program of skeptical enquiry was successful in laying a firm foundation for our manifold beliefs. He subjects Descartes's conclusions to Descartes's own uncompromising methodology to determine whether Descartes escaped from a self-imposed radical skepticism.
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  2. Moving Cartesian Bodies.Tyler Doggett - manuscript
    Argues that Descartes's commitment to mind-body causation leads to a commitment to body-body causation.
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  3. Descartes and the Crazy Argument.Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    In Meditation I, Descartes dismisses the possibility that he might be insane as a ground for doubting that the senses are a source of knowledge of the external world. In this paper, I argue that Descartes was justified in so doing, and draw some general epistemological conclusions from this result.
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  4. Descartes' Refutation of Atheism: A Defense.Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    Descartes argues that, apart from the existence of a veracious God, we can have no reason to believe that we possess reliable cognitive faculties, with the result that, if atheism is true, not even our seemingly most certain beliefs can count as knowledge for us. Since the atheist denies the existence of God, he or she will be precisely in this position. I argue that Descartes' argument is sound, and that atheism is therefore self-refuting.
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  5. The Problem of the Poor King, From Descartes and Rousseau.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    In this paper, I present the problem of the poor king, from combining Descartes and Rousseau.
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  6. Why Does Descartes Say That He is Not His Body in the Second Meditation?Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This paper contests a standard interpretation of how Descartes comes to the conclusion that he is not his body in the second meditation. I propose an alternative interpretation in its place.
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  7. Locke on Descartes on Unavoidable Thoughts.Michael Jacovides - manuscript
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  8. Descartes on What "Truly Belongs" to Us.Saja Parvizian - manuscript
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  9. The Problem of Descartes's First Meditation and its Solution.Charles Raff - manuscript
    Descartes’s First Meditation imposes a pressing, currently neglected problem of reconciling its sound central argument that concludes that all the meditator’s current and currently prospective results are doubtful with subsequent Meditations’ results that are not at all doubtful. The problem cannot be addressed by received interpretations that fail to credit the First Meditation with a sound extended central argument; it cannot be solved by interpretations reliant on standard translations that obscure the Second Meditation’s opening argument. This study credits the First (...)
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  10. God, the Demon, and the Cogito.William J. Rapaport - manuscript
    The purpose of this essay is to exhibit in detail the setting for the version of the Cogito Argument that appears in Descartes’s Meditations. I believe that a close reading of the text can shed new light on the nature and role of the “evil demon”, on the nature of God as he appears in the first few Meditations, and on the place of the Cogito Argument in Descartes’s overall scheme.
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  11. A Question Concerning Descartes: The Method of Doubt and The Mind/Body Problem.Christopher P. Satoor - manuscript
  12. The Early Modern Rationalists and the Substantial Form: From Natural Philosophy to Metaphysics.Valtteri Viljanen - manuscript
    This paper argues that, contrary to what one might think, early modern rationalism displays an increasing and well-grounded sensitivity to certain metaphysical questions the substantial form was designed to answer – despite the fact that the notion itself was in such disrepute, and emphatically banished from natural philosophy. This main thesis is established by examining the thought of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz through the framework constituted by what have been designated as the two aspects, metaphysical and physical, of the substantial (...)
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  13. Against Passionate Epistemology: Defending Pure Thought in the Meditations.Saja Parvizian -
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  14. Is Descartes 'Dualism Descartes' Error?Kamuran Gödelek - unknown - Yeditepe'de Felsefe (Philosophy at Yeditepe) 7.
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  15. Descartes And Ibn-Sina On The Soul.Fadlollah Khaliqiyan - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 18.
    This article is to analize the doctrines of two great philosophers, Descarets and Ibn-Sina on the soul.As he himself said, Descartes, while doubting on anything, was sure that " cogito ergo sum".He found this an unquestionable fact, therefore he took it as the first principle.After Descartes, some objections have been posed against his doctrine; for example the objection, posed by Ibn-Sina. Ibn-Sina believed that thinking is among the soul's acts, and the soul cannot be affirmed through one of its own (...)
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  16. Descartes On The Divine Eternal Truths.Andrew Pessin - unknown - Yeditepe'de Felsefe (Philosophy at Yeditepe) 5.
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  17. La thérapeutique de Descartes dans Les "remedia et vires medicamentorum".Vincent Aucante - forthcoming - Les Etudes Philosophiques.
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  18. Espacio Matemático y Tecnologías de la Imagen: De Descartes a Oteiza, Barceló y Bavcar.Ignacio Ayestarán Uriz - forthcoming - Enrahonar: Quaderns de Filosofía.
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  19. Descartes as Catholic Philosopher and Natural Philosopher in Advance.Steven Baldner - forthcoming - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association.
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  20. Descartes Et la Fortune.Jean-Christophe Bardout - forthcoming - Les Etudes Philosophiques.
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  21. La portée anti-cartésienne du fragment des trois ordres.Hélène Bouchilloux - forthcoming - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
    Cet article vise à souligner la centrante de Laf.308, Br.793 au sein des Pensées, tout en déterminant sa portée anti-cartésienne. Une confrontation avec d'autres fragments connexes permet de préciser ce que Pascal met sous le deuxième ordre : une science relayée par la pensée, non la métaphysique cartésienne. Il devient alors possible de discuter l'interprétation de Jean-Luc Marion et de montrer que, loin d'opérer une simple destitution de la métaphysique cartésienne au nom de la charité chrétienne, Laf.308, Br.793 résume bien (...)
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  22. Oxford Handbook of Early Modern Philosophy.Desmonde Clarke Catherine Wilson (ed.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
  23. Not a Sailor in His Ship: Descartes on Bodily Awareness.Colin Chamberlain - forthcoming - In Routledge Handbook of Bodily Awareness.
    Despite his reputation for neglecting the body, Descartes develops a systematic account of bodily awareness. He holds that in bodily awareness each of us feels intimately connected to our body. We experience this body as inescapable, as infused with bodily sensations and volitions, and as a special object of concern. This multifaceted experience plays an ambivalent role in Descartes’s philosophy. Bodily awareness is epistemically dangerous. It tempts us to falsely judge that we cannot exist apart from our bodies. But bodily (...)
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  24. Descartes on the Passions of the Soul and Internal Emotions: Two Challenges for Interoception Research in Emotions.Helena De Preester & John Dorsch - forthcoming - Danish Yearbook of Philosophy.
    On the basis of Descartes’s account of the passions of the soul, we argue that current interoception-based theories of emotions cannot account for the hallmark of a passion of the soul, i.e., that its effects are felt as being in the soul itself. We also pay attention to the epistemic functions of the passions and to Descartes’s category of emotions that are caused and occur in the soul alone. Certain passions of the soul and certain internal (or intellectual) emotions are (...)
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  25. Cartesianism and its Feminist Promise and Limits: The Case of Mary Astell.Karen Detlefsen - forthcoming - In Catherine Wilson & Stephen Gaukroger (eds.), Descartes and Cartesianism: Essays in Honour of Desmond Clarke. Oxford University Press.
    In this paper, I consider Mary Astell's contributions to the history of feminism, noting her grounding in and departure from Cartesianism and its relation to women.
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  26. Du Châtelet and Descartes on the Role of Hypothesis and Metaphysics in Science.Karen Detlefsen - forthcoming - In Eileen O'Neill & Marcy Lascano (eds.), Feminism and the History of Philosophy. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    In this chapter, I examine similarities and divergences between Du Châtelet and Descartes on their endorsement of the use of hypotheses in science, using the work of Condillac to locate them in his scheme of systematizers. I conclude that, while Du Châtelet is still clearly a natural philosopher, as opposed to modern scientist, her conception of hypotheses is considerably more modern than is Descartes’, a difference that finds its roots in their divergence on the nature of first principles.
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  27. Andrea Strazzoni. Dutch Cartesianism and the Birth of Philosophy of Science: From Regius to ’s Gravesande. [REVIEW]Mihnea Dobre - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
  28. Descartes' Mathematics.Mary Domski - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  29. Cartesian Passions in Advance.Abel B. Franco - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophical Research.
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  30. Ego Cogito.M. Garrido - forthcoming - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy.
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  31. Bohemia Revisited.Karen Gaylord - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
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  32. Descartes on the Eternal Truths and Essences of Mathematics: An Alternative Reading.Helen Hattab - forthcoming - New Content is Available for Vivarium.
    _ Source: _Page Count 46 René Descartes is neither a Conceptualist nor a Platonist when it comes to the ontological status of the eternal truths and essences of mathematics but articulates a view derived from Proclus. There are several advantages to interpreting Descartes’ texts in light of Proclus’ view of universals and philosophy of mathematics. Key passages that, on standard readings, are in conflict are reconciled if we read Descartes as appropriating Proclus’ threefold distinction among universals. Specifically, passages that appear (...)
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  33. Descartes on Other Minds.Donald Henze - forthcoming - American Philosophical Quarterly.
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  34. Cogito ergo sum, comme inférence et comme performance.Jaakko Hintikka - forthcoming - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
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  35. The Analytical Method in Descartes' Geometrie.Giorgio Israel - forthcoming - Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science.
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  36. Is Descartes' Conception of the Soul Orthodox ?Zbigniew Janowski - forthcoming - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
    In the Letter to the Faculty of Theology of the Sorbonne, Descartes makes a reference to Leo's X's encyclical Apostolici Regiminis (1513), which supports the Aristotelian-Scholastic conception of the soul as anima corporis forma According to Descartes' doctrine of the eternal truths, God's power is absolutely unlimited. One of the consequences of this doctrine is that God could join a rational (human) soul to any body, which implies that the union of soul and the body in the Cartesian system is (...)
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  37. Descartes and Nietzsche on the Soul of Man and Life-Everlasting in Advance.David Kaye - forthcoming - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy.
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  38. Un Ram Eau Oublié du Cartésianism.Christopher Kirwan - forthcoming - Revue Thomiste.
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  39. Descartes’ Foundation and Borges’ Ruins: How to Doubt the Cogito.Uri D. Leibowitz - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    Descartes claimed that the Cogito is ‘so firm and sure that all the most extravagant suppositions of the sceptics were incapable of shaking it’. This paper aims to demonstrate that this claim is false by presenting a sceptical scenario for the Cogito. It is argued that the story ‘The Circular Ruins’ by J. L. Borges illustrates that one can doubt one’s own existence and that pace Descartes (and many others) the claim ‘I am, I exist, is necessarily true whenever it (...)
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  40. Descartes' "Dioptrics" and Descartes' Optics.Jeffrey K. McDonough - forthcoming - In Larry Nolan (ed.), The Cambridge Descartes Lexicon. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    The Dioptrique, often translated as the Optics or, more literally, as the Dioptrics is one of Descartes’ earliest works. Likely begun in the mid to late 1620’s, Descartes refers to it by name in a letter to Mersenne of 25 November 1630 III, 29). Its subject matter partially overlaps with Descartes’ more foundational project The World or Treatise on Light in which he offers a general mechanistic account of the universe including the formation, transmission, and reception of light. Although Galileo’s (...)
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  41. The Problematic Nature of the Cogito.Michel Meyer - forthcoming - Acta Philosophica Fennica: Language, Knowledge, and Intentionality.
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  42. Descartes and Spinoza on the Passions.Noa Naaman (ed.) - forthcoming - Cambridge University Press.
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  43. Descartes on the Unity of the Virtues.Saja Parvizian - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophical Research.
    Commentators have neglected a tension in Descartes’ virtue theory. In some texts, Descartes seems to argue that there are distinct virtues. In other texts, Descartes seems to argue that there is only a single virtue–the firm and constant resolution to use the will well. In this paper, I reconcile this tension. I argue that Descartes endorses a specific version of the unity of the virtues thesis, namely, the identity of the virtues. Nonetheless, Descartes has the resources to draw conceptual distinctions (...)
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  44. Context and Self-Related Reflection: : Elisabeth of Bohemia’s Way to Address the Moral Objectiveness – Forthcoming/Last Draft.Katarina Peixoto - forthcoming - In Women in the History of Philosophy and Sciences.
    In this work I intend to explore the textual and conceptual roots of the moral view in the Early Modern Rationalism of Cartesian spectrum as detected by Elisabeth of Bohemia. To this intent, I will drive my analysis, first, to the remark Descartes adds to his own provisional morality of the Discourse in the Letter of August 4th, 1645 to Elisabeth. Second, I will approach the two aspects of her reply to Descartes, both in her Letter of September 13th 1645, (...)
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  45. What Did Elisabeth Ask Descartes? A Reading Proposal of the First Letter of the Correspondence.Katarina Peixoto - forthcoming - Revista Seiscentos.
    In May 1643 Elisabeth of Bohemia addressed a question to Descartes which inaugurated a six-year Correspondence, until his death. He dedicates his mature metaphysical work to the Princess (Principles of First Philosophy, 1644) and writes Passions of the Soul (1649) as one of the results of the dialogue with the philosopher of Bohemia. The silencing of the last hundred years of historiography on Elisabeth of Bohemia's legacy in this epistolary exchange caused distortions and, in some cases, underpinned the bias as (...)
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  46. Una ciencia admirable: filosofía y admiración en Descartes.Vicente Raga-Rosaleny - forthcoming - Filosofia Unisinos:1-12.
    Aunque Descartes pretende hablar de cuestiones morales en general, y de las pasiones en particular, como si nadie hubiera escrito antes sobre ellas, lo cierto es que, en el caso de la admiración, es clara su referencia al mundo antiguo. En concreto, en este caso el pensador francés se sitúa críticamente en contra de la postura aristotélica, que entiende la admiración como el inicio de la filosofía. Frente a la propuesta clásica, que convierte dicha emoción en el motor permanente de (...)
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  47. La réalité objective dans les Premières objections aux Méditations métaphysiques : Ockham contre Descartes.Laurence Renault - forthcoming - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
    Cet article se propose de mettre au jour l'influence occamienne de la critique que Caterus adresse, dans les Premières objections, à la notion cartésienne de réalité objective de l'idée. This article intends to point out the ockhamist inspiration of the arguments of Caterus against the cartesian notion of idea's objective reality in the First objections.
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  48. Descartes on Necessity and the Laws of Nature.Nathan Rockwood - forthcoming - Journal of Analytic Theology.
    This paper is on Descartes’ account of modality and, in particular, his account of the necessity of the laws of nature. He famously argues that the necessity of the “eternal truths” of logic and mathematics depends on God’s will. Here I suggest he has the same view about the necessity of the laws of nature. Further, I argue, this is a plausible theory of laws. For philosophers often talk about something being physically necessary because of the laws of nature, but (...)
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  49. The Networked Origins of Cartesian Philosophy and Science.Paolo Rossini - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science:000-000.
    Most studies of René Descartes’s legacy have focused on the novelty of his ideas, but little has been done to uncover the conditions that allowed these ideas to spread. Seventeenth-century Europe was already a small world—it presented a high degree of connectedness with a few brokers bridging otherwise disparate regions. A communication network known as the Republic of Letters enabled scholars to trade ideas—including Descartes’s—by means of correspondence. This article offers an analysis—both qualitative and quantitative—of a corpus of letters written (...)
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  50. Elisabeth, Princess of Bohemia.Lisa Shapiro - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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