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  1. Descartes's Method of Doubt.Leslie Allan - manuscript
    Enlightenment philosopher, René Descartes, set out to establish what could be known with certainty, untainted by a deceiving demon. With his method of doubt, he rejected all previous beliefs, allowing only those that survived rigorous scrutiny. In this essay, Leslie Allan examines whether Descartes's program of skeptical enquiry was successful in laying a firm foundation for our manifold beliefs. He subjects Descartes's conclusions to Descartes's own uncompromising methodology to determine whether Descartes escaped from a self-imposed radical skepticism.
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  2. Moving Cartesian Bodies.Tyler Doggett - manuscript
    Argues that Descartes's commitment to mind-body causation leads to a commitment to body-body causation.
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  3. Descartes and the Crazy Argument.Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    In Meditation I, Descartes dismisses the possibility that he might be insane as a ground for doubting that the senses are a source of knowledge of the external world. In this paper, I argue that Descartes was justified in so doing, and draw some general epistemological conclusions from this result.
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  4. Descartes' Refutation of Atheism: A Defense.Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    Descartes argues that, apart from the existence of a veracious God, we can have no reason to believe that we possess reliable cognitive faculties, with the result that, if atheism is true, not even our seemingly most certain beliefs can count as knowledge for us. Since the atheist denies the existence of God, he or she will be precisely in this position. I argue that Descartes' argument is sound, and that atheism is therefore self-refuting.
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  5. Why Does Descartes Say That He is Not His Body in the Second Meditation?Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This paper contests a standard interpretation of how Descartes comes to the conclusion that he is not his body in the second meditation. I propose an alternative interpretation in its place.
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  6. Locke on Descartes on Unavoidable Thoughts.Michael Jacovides - manuscript
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  7. The Problem of Descartes's First Meditation and its Solution.Charles Raff - manuscript
    Descartes’s First Meditation imposes a pressing, currently neglected problem of reconciling its sound central argument that concludes that all the meditator’s current and currently prospective results are doubtful with subsequent Meditations’ results that are not at all doubtful. The problem cannot be addressed by received interpretations that fail to credit the First Meditation with a sound extended central argument; it cannot be solved by interpretations reliant on standard translations that obscure the Second Meditation’s opening argument. This study credits the First (...)
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  8. God, the Demon, and the Cogito.William J. Rapaport - manuscript
    The purpose of this essay is to exhibit in detail the setting for the version of the Cogito Argument that appears in Descartes’s Meditations. I believe that a close reading of the text can shed new light on the nature and role of the “evil demon”, on the nature of God as he appears in the first few Meditations, and on the place of the Cogito Argument in Descartes’s overall scheme.
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  9. A Question Concerning Descartes: The Method of Doubt and The Mind/Body Problem.Christopher P. Satoor - manuscript
  10. Is Descartes 'Dualism Descartes' Error?Kamuran Gödelek - unknown - Yeditepe'de Felsefe (Philosophy at Yeditepe) 7.
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  11. Descartes And Ibn-Sina On The Soul.Fadlollah Khaliqiyan - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 18.
    This article is to analize the doctrines of two great philosophers, Descarets and Ibn-Sina on the soul.As he himself said, Descartes, while doubting on anything, was sure that " cogito ergo sum".He found this an unquestionable fact, therefore he took it as the first principle.After Descartes, some objections have been posed against his doctrine; for example the objection, posed by Ibn-Sina. Ibn-Sina believed that thinking is among the soul's acts, and the soul cannot be affirmed through one of its own (...)
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  12. Descartes On The Divine Eternal Truths.Andrew Pessin - unknown - Yeditepe'de Felsefe (Philosophy at Yeditepe) 5.
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  13. La thérapeutique de Descartes dans Les "remedia et vires medicamentorum".Vincent Aucante - forthcoming - Les Etudes Philosophiques.
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  14. Espacio Matemático y Tecnologías de la Imagen: De Descartes a Oteiza, Barceló y Bavcar.Ignacio Ayestarán Uriz - forthcoming - Enrahonar: Quaderns de Filosofía.
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  15. Descartes as Catholic Philosopher and Natural Philosopher in Advance.Steven Baldner - forthcoming - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association.
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  16. Descartes Et la Fortune.Jean-Christophe Bardout - forthcoming - Les Etudes Philosophiques.
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  17. La portée anti-cartésienne du fragment des trois ordres.Hélène Bouchilloux - forthcoming - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
    Cet article vise à souligner la centrante de Laf.308, Br.793 au sein des Pensées, tout en déterminant sa portée anti-cartésienne. Une confrontation avec d'autres fragments connexes permet de préciser ce que Pascal met sous le deuxième ordre : une science relayée par la pensée, non la métaphysique cartésienne. Il devient alors possible de discuter l'interprétation de Jean-Luc Marion et de montrer que, loin d'opérer une simple destitution de la métaphysique cartésienne au nom de la charité chrétienne, Laf.308, Br.793 résume bien (...)
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  18. Oxford Handbook of Early Modern Philosophy.Desmonde Clarke Catherine Wilson (ed.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
  19. Le bon usage de l'imagination: Malebranche lecteur des Regulae ad directionem ingenii.Frédéric de Buzon - forthcoming - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia.
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  20. Du Châtelet and Descartes on the Role of Hypothesis and Metaphysics in Science.Karen Detlefsen - forthcoming - In Eileen O'Neill & Marcy Lascano (eds.), Feminism and the History of Philosophy. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    In this chapter, I examine similarities and divergences between Du Châtelet and Descartes on their endorsement of the use of hypotheses in science, using the work of Condillac to locate them in his scheme of systematizers. I conclude that, while Du Châtelet is still clearly a natural philosopher, as opposed to modern scientist, her conception of hypotheses is considerably more modern than is Descartes’, a difference that finds its roots in their divergence on the nature of first principles.
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  21. Cartesianism and its Feminist Promise and Limits: The Case of Mary Astell.Karen Detlefsen - forthcoming - In Catherine Wilson & Stephen Gaukroger (eds.), Descartes and Cartesianism: Essays in Honour of Desmond Clarke. Oxford University Press.
    In this paper, I consider Mary Astell's contributions to the history of feminism, noting her grounding in and departure from Cartesianism and its relation to women.
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  22. Andrea Strazzoni. Dutch Cartesianism and the Birth of Philosophy of Science: From Regius to ’s Gravesande. [REVIEW]Mihnea Dobre - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
  23. Descartes' Mathematics.Mary Domski - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  24. Cartesian Passions in Advance.Abel B. Franco - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophical Research.
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  25. Ego Cogito.M. Garrido - forthcoming - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy.
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  26. The Epistemic Role of Imagination in Descartes's First Meditation.Lynda Gaudemard - forthcoming - The European Legacy.
    While imagination was a major concern for Descartes throughout his work, Cartesian scholars have paid little attention to this faculty, especially regarding to the Meditations of First Philosophy. This article highlights the epistemic role of imagination in the First Meditation. I argue that the way Descartes’s conception of imagination is elaborated in the First Meditation helps question our interpretation of his dualism, and enables us to formulate the hypothesis that imagination belongs to the essence of the mind. It results that (...)
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  27. Bohemia Revisited.Karen Gaylord - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  28. Descartes on the Eternal Truths and Essences of Mathematics: An Alternative Reading.Helen Hattab - forthcoming - New Content is Available for Vivarium.
    _ Source: _Page Count 46 René Descartes is neither a Conceptualist nor a Platonist when it comes to the ontological status of the eternal truths and essences of mathematics but articulates a view derived from Proclus. There are several advantages to interpreting Descartes’ texts in light of Proclus’ view of universals and philosophy of mathematics. Key passages that, on standard readings, are in conflict are reconciled if we read Descartes as appropriating Proclus’ threefold distinction among universals. Specifically, passages that appear (...)
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  29. Descartes on Other Minds.Donald Henze - forthcoming - American Philosophical Quarterly.
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  30. Cogito ergo sum, comme inférence et comme performance.Jaakko Hintikka - forthcoming - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
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  31. The Analytical Method in Descartes' Geometrie.Giorgio Israel - forthcoming - Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science.
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  32. Is Descartes' Conception of the Soul Orthodox ?Zbigniew Janowski - forthcoming - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
    In the Letter to the Faculty of Theology of the Sorbonne, Descartes makes a reference to Leo's X's encyclical Apostolici Regiminis (1513), which supports the Aristotelian-Scholastic conception of the soul as anima corporis forma According to Descartes' doctrine of the eternal truths, God's power is absolutely unlimited. One of the consequences of this doctrine is that God could join a rational (human) soul to any body, which implies that the union of soul and the body in the Cartesian system is (...)
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  33. Descartes and Nietzsche on the Soul of Man and Life-Everlasting in Advance.David Kaye - forthcoming - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy.
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  34. Un Ram Eau Oublié du Cartésianism.Christopher Kirwan - forthcoming - Revue Thomiste.
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  35. Descartes' "Dioptrics" and Descartes' Optics.Jeffrey K. McDonough - forthcoming - In Larry Nolan (ed.), The Cambridge Descartes Lexicon. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    The Dioptrique, often translated as the Optics or, more literally, as the Dioptrics is one of Descartes’ earliest works. Likely begun in the mid to late 1620’s, Descartes refers to it by name in a letter to Mersenne of 25 November 1630 III, 29). Its subject matter partially overlaps with Descartes’ more foundational project The World or Treatise on Light in which he offers a general mechanistic account of the universe including the formation, transmission, and reception of light. Although Galileo’s (...)
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  36. The Problematic Nature of the Cogito.Michel Meyer - forthcoming - Acta Philosophica Fennica: Language, Knowledge, and Intentionality.
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  37. Christian Platonism in Early Modernity.Derek A. Michaud - forthcoming - In Alexander J. B. Hampton & John P. Kenney (eds.), Christian Platonism: A History. Cambridge University Press.
  38. Descartes and Spinoza on the Passions.Noa Naaman (ed.) - forthcoming - Cambridge University Press.
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  39. Against Passionate Epistemology: Defending Pure Thought in the Meditations.Saja Parvizian - forthcoming - The European Legacy.
    A revisionary reading of Descartes’ epistemology is beginning to emerge in the literature on Descartes’ ethics. Some commentators have argued that Descartes ascribes to passionate epistemology, which claims that epistemic progress in the Meditations requires moral progress—in particular, the regulation of the passions. I argue that on a plausible understanding of the cognitive nature of the passions— namely, a motivationalist reading—the passions cannot perform any epistemic work in the Meditations. Thus, while the presence of the passions in the Meditations is (...)
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  40. La réalité objective dans les Premières objections aux Méditations métaphysiques : Ockham contre Descartes.Laurence Renault - forthcoming - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
    Cet article se propose de mettre au jour l'influence occamienne de la critique que Caterus adresse, dans les Premières objections, à la notion cartésienne de réalité objective de l'idée. This article intends to point out the ockhamist inspiration of the arguments of Caterus against the cartesian notion of idea's objective reality in the First objections.
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  41. Elisabeth, Princess of Bohemia.Lisa Shapiro - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  42. Replacing Descartes’s “Thinking Thing” With Deely’s “Semiotic Animal” in Advance.Smith Richard Currie - forthcoming - American Journal of Semiotics.
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  43. The Role of Virtue in Descartes' Ethical Theory, Or: Was Descartes a Virtue Ethicist?Frans Svensson - forthcoming - History of Philosophy Quarterly.
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  44. La Mettrie Ou les Morts de Monsieur Machine.Ann Thomson - forthcoming - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia.
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  45. Two Problems in Spinoza's Theory of Mind.James Van Cleve - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Mind.
    My aim in what follows is to expound and (if possible) resolve two problems in Spinoza’s theory of mind. The first problem is how Spinoza can accept a key premise in Descartes’s argument for dualism—that thought and extension are separately conceivable, “one without the help of the other”—without accepting Descartes’s conclusion that no substance is both thinking and extended. Resolving this problem will require us to consider a crucial ambiguity in the notion of conceiving one thing without another, the credentials (...)
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  46. Against the Doctrine of Infallibility.Christopher Willard-Kyle - forthcoming - The Philosophical Quarterly.
    According to the doctrine of infallibility, one is permitted to believe p if one knows that necessarily, one would be right if one believed that p. This plausible principle—made famous in Descartes’ cogito—is false. There are some self-fulfilling, higher-order propositions one can’t be wrong about but shouldn’t believe anyway: believing them would immediately make one’s overall doxastic state worse.
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  47. “Man-Machines and Embodiment: From Cartesian Physiology to Claude Bernard’s ‘Living Machine’”.Charles T. Wolfe & Philippe Huneman - forthcoming - In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), Embodiment, Oxford Philosophical Concepts. Oxford University Press.
    A common and enduring early modern intuition is that materialists reduce organisms in general and human beings in particular to automata. Wasn’t a famous book of the time entitled L’Homme-Machine? In fact, the machine is employed as an analogy, and there was a specifically materialist form of embodiment, in which the body is not reduced to an inanimate machine, but is conceived as an affective, flesh-and-blood entity. We discuss how mechanist and vitalist models of organism exist in a more complementary (...)
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  48. Of Dreams, Demons, and Whirlpools: Doubt, Skepticism, and Suspension of Judgment in Descartes's Meditations.Jan Forsman - 2021 - Dissertation, Tampere University
    I offer a novel reading in this dissertation of René Descartes’s (1596–1650) skepticism in his work Meditations on First Philosophy (1641–1642). I specifically aim to answer the following problem: How is Descartes’s skepticism to be read in accordance with the rest of his philosophy? This problem can be divided into two more general questions in Descartes scholarship: How is skepticism utilized in the Meditations, and what are its intentions and relation to the preceding philosophical tradition? -/- I approach the topic (...)
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  49. Rethinking Descartes’s Substance Dualism.Lynda Gaudemard - 2021 - Springer.
    This monograph presents an interpretation of Descartes's dualism, which differs from the standard reading called 'classical separatist dualism' claiming that the mind can exist without the body. It argues that, contrary to what it is commonly claimed, Descartes’s texts suggest an emergent creationist substance dualism, according to which the mind is a nonphysical substance (created and maintained by God), which cannot begin to think without a well-disposed body. According to this interpretation, God’s laws of nature endow each human body with (...)
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  50. Spinoza on Causa Sui.Yitzhak Melamed - 2021 - In Blackwell Companion to Spinoza. Blackwell. pp. 116-125.
    The very first line of Spinoza’s magnum opus, the Ethics, states the following surprising definition: By cause of itself I understand that whose essence involves existence, or that whose nature cannot be conceived except as existing [Per causam sui intelligo id, cujus essentia involvit existentiam, sive id, cujus natura non potest concipi, nisi existens]. As we shall shortly see, for many of Spinoza’s contemporaries and predecessors the very notion of causa sui was utterly absurd, akin to a Baron Munchausen attempting (...)
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1 — 50 / 4389