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Subcategories:History/traditions: Reproductive Ethics

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  1. In Vitro Gametogenesis: The End of Egg Donation?Sarah Carter‐Walshaw - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (1):60-67.
    This paper explores whether egg donation could still be ethically justified if in vitro gametogenesis (IVG) became reliable and safe. In order to do this, issues and concerns that might inform a patient’s reasoning in choosing to use donor eggs instead of IVG are explored and assessed. It is concluded that egg donation would only be ethically justified in a narrow range of special cases given the (hypothetical) availability of IVG treatment and, further, that egg donation could itself be replaced (...)
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  2. The Need for Donor Consent in Mitochondrial Replacement.G. Owen Schaefer - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (12):825-829.
    Mitochondrial replacement therapy requires oocytes of women whose mitochondrial DNA will be transmitted to resultant children. These techniques are scientifically, ethically and socially controversial; it is likely that some women who donate their oocytes for general in vitro fertilisation usage would nevertheless oppose their genetic material being used in MRT. The possibility of oocytes being used in MRT is therefore relevant to oocyte donation and should be included in the consent process when applicable. In present circumstances, specific consent should be (...)
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  3. Justicia Intergeneracional: ensayos desde el pensamiento de Lukas H. Meyer.Santiago Truccone Borgogno (ed.) - 2017 - Córdoba, Cordoba, Argentina: Editorial Universidad Nacional de Cordoba.
    Hasta hace no mucho tiempo, la mayor parte de nuestras discusiones sobre derechos y obligaciones giraba en relación a lo que le debemos a nuestros contemporáneos, sean estos conciudadanos o habitantes de otras partes del mundo. Este libro intenta adentrarse en el estudio de la cuestión intergeneracional e incluye, por un lado, las discusiones referidas a nuestras obligaciones para con las personas futuras; y, por el otro, a aquellas derivadas de la comisión de actos de injusticia por parte de determinados (...)
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  4. ‘Women-Protective’ Language as a Tool of Exclusion: Debates on Oocyte Donation in Latvia.Signe Mezinska & Ilze Mileiko - 2018 - European Journal of Women's Studies:1-14.
    ‘Women-protective’ language is broadly used as a frame in political discussions on women’s reproductive healthcare and labour rights. This article addresses the use of ‘women-protective’ language in online news articles in the Latvian media about the proposed prohibition of oocyte donation for nulliparous women. The main focus of the recent Latvian debate has not been on the technology itself, but rather on the female body and women’s rationality and decision-making capacity. The results of the analysis show that use of the (...)
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  5. Review of Challenging Nature: The Clash of Science and Spirituality at the New Frontiers of Life by Lee M. Silver. [REVIEW]W. Malcolm Byrnes - 2007 - Worldviews: Environment, Culture, Religion 11:248-253.
  6. Why Governance? A Challenge to Good Governance of Biobanks.Katharine Browne - 2015 - Monash Bioethics Review 33 (4):295-300.
    In this commentary on Karla Stroud and Kieran O’Doherty’s ‘Ethically Sustainable Governance in the Biobanking of Eggs and Embryos for Research’ (2015) I call into question the need for good governance to overcome the challenges facing biobanking of eggs and embryos. I argue that the principles of good governance for biobanking that Stroud and O’Doherty outline come up short in providing concrete normative guidance to resolve the challenges associated with a biobank for eggs and embryos.
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  7. The Quest for Human Dignity in the Ethics of Pregnancy Termination.Tom J. Obengo - 2016 - Eugene, Oregon, USA: Wipf & Stock.
    This study describes and analyses the problem of termination of pregnancy, with special attention to its prevalence in Kenya, where more than seven hundred abortions are performed daily on girls between fifteen and seventeen years of age. Although pregnancy termination is illegal in Kenya, its practice goes on in the rural villages, in homes, in urban streets and in private clinics. The book focuses on the ethical quest for human dignity in the context of the church’s response to the challenge (...)
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  8. A Defense of Abortion. [REVIEW]Rob Lovering - 2003 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 20:214-17.
    This is a review of David Boonin's A Defense of Abortion (Cambridge University Press, 2002).
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  9. Rethinking Reprogenetics: Enhancing Ethical Analyses of Reprogenetic Technologies.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2017 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Reprogenetic technologies, which combine the power of reproductive techniques with the tools of genetic science and technology, promise prospective parents a remarkable degree of control to pick and choose the likely characteristics of their offspring. Not only can they select embryos with or without particular genetically-related diseases and disabilities but also choose embryos with non-disease related traits such as sex. -/- Prominent authors such as Agar, Buchanan, DeGrazia, Green, Harris, Robertson, Savulescu, and Silver have flocked to the banner of reprogenetics. (...)
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  10. Motherhood in the Context of Normative Discourse: Birth Stories of Mothers of Children with Down Syndrome.Susan L. Gabel & Kathy Kotel - 2018 - Journal of Medical Humanities 39 (2):179-193.
    Using birth stories as our object of inquiry, this article examines the ways in which normative discourses about gender, disability and Down syndrome construct the birth stories of three mothers of children with Down syndrome. Their stories are composed of the mothers’ recollections of the first hours after birth as a time when their infants are separated from them and their postpartum needs are ignored. Together, their stories illustrate socio-cultural tropes that position Down syndrome as a dangerous form of the (...)
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  11. At Law: Punishing Mothers.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28 (1):31.
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  12. Capital Report: Doing Things with Embryos.Joseph Palca - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (1):5.
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  13. At Law: Webster and the Politics of Abortion.George J. Annas - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (2):36.
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  14. My Mother Wasn't.Shirley Geok-Lin Lim - 1996 - Feminist Studies 22 (3):553.
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  15. Between Parents.Joan Cusack Handler - 1994 - Feminist Studies 20 (1):86.
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  16. Research with Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Ethical Considerations.Geron Ethics Advisory Board - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (2):31.
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  17. At Law: Too Many Parents.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28 (5):22.
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  18. Chimeras and Odysseys Toward Understanding the Technology-Dependent Child.Arthur F. Kohrman - 1994 - Hastings Center Report 24 (5):S4.
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  19. Case Studies: Maternal Rights, Fetal Harms.Carson Strong & Kathy Kinlaw - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (3):21.
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  20. At Law: A French Homunculus in a Tennessee Court.George J. Annas - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (6):20.
  21. Mother's Shoes.Shirley Geok-Lin Lim - 1996 - Feminist Studies 22 (3):552.
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  22. The Mother of the Bride.Jane Jacobson - 1996 - Feminist Studies 22 (3):659.
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  23. Having a Child Together in Lesbian Families: Combining Gestation and Genetics.Guido Pennings - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (4):253-255.
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  24. Métaphysique et éthique de la reproduction.Lynda Gaudemard - 2017 - Dialogue 56 (1):1-19.
    In this article, I examine the standard assumption that ethical disagreements on abortion and human embryonic stem cells research are grounded on metaphysical claims that underlie these ethical issues. Contrary to what some philosophers have claimed, I argue that, although the bioethical positions about the human embryo’s moral status are partly grounded on metaphysical claims, incorporating metaphysical arguments in the debates about the ethics of reproduction will not resolve this issue.
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  25. Apostrophe, Animation, and Abortion.Barbara Johnson - 1986 - Diacritics 16 (1):28.
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  26. Cell Churches and Stem Cell Marketing in South Korea and the United States.Douglas Sipp - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics 17 (3):167-172.
    The commercial provision of putative stem cell-based medical interventions in the absence of conclusive evidence of safety and efficacy has formed the basis of an unregulated industry for more than a decade. Many clinics offering such supposed stem cell treatments include statements about the ‘ethical’ nature of somatic stem cells, in specific contrast to human embryonic stem cells, which have been the subject of intensive political, legal, and religious controversy since their first derivation in 1998. Christian groups—both Roman Catholic and (...)
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  27. The Italian Way to Stem Cell Research: Rethinking the Role of Catholic Religion in Shaping Italian Stem Cell Research Regulations.Lorenzo Beltrame - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics 17 (3):157-166.
    Stem cell research regulations are highly variable across nations, notwithstanding shared and common ethical concerns. Dominant in political debates has been the so-called embryo question. However, the permissibility of human embryonic stem cell research varies among national regulatory frameworks. Scholars have explained differences by resorting to notions of political culture, traditions of ethical reasoning, discursive strategies and political manoeuvring of involved actors. Explanations based on the role of religion or other cultural structural variables are also employed. This paper analyses the (...)
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  28. From Ethical Exceptionalism to Ethical Exceptions: The Rule and Exception Model and the Changing Meaning of Ethics In German Bioregulation.Kathrin Braun - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics 17 (3):146-156.
    Germany is an interesting case with respect to the governance of reprogenetics. It has a strong profile in the technosciences and high aims regarding the global bioeconomy, yet her regulation of human genetics, reproductive medicine and embryo research has for a long time been rather restrictive. German biopolitical exceptionalism has often been explained by reference to Catholicism and the legacy of the Nazi past. The Germans, so goes the common story, have learnt the lessons of history and translated them into (...)
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  29. When the Milk of Human Kindness Becomes a Luxury (and Untested) Good. A Reply to Harris’ Unconditional Embrace of Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (1):159-165.
    A new reprogenetic technology, mitochondrial replacement, is making its appearance and, unsurprisingly given its promise to wash off our earthly stains --or at least the scourges of sexual reproduction--, John Harris finds only reasons to celebrate this new scientific feat.1 In fact, he finds mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRTs) so “unreservedly welcome” that he believes those who reject them suffer from “a large degree of desperation and not a little callousness.”2 Believing myself to be neither desperate nor callous, but finding myself (...)
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  30. The Transfer and Delegation of Responsibilities for Genetic Offspring in Gamete Provision.Reuven Brandt - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (5):665-678.
    In this article I reject the claim that the responsibilities acquired by gamete providers can be transferred to their biological children's intending parents. I defend this position by first showing that arguments in defence of the transferability of responsibilities in gamete provision cases fail to distinguish between the transfer and delegation of responsibility. I then provide an argument against the transferability of responsibilities in gamete provision cases that differs from the ones offered by James Lindemann Nelson and Rivka Weinberg. Though (...)
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  31. Losing Thomas & Ella: A Father’s Story.Marcus B. Weaver-Hightower - 2017 - Journal of Medical Humanities 38 (3):215-230.
    “Losing Thomas & Ella” presents a research comic about one father’s perinatal loss of twins. The comic recounts Paul’s experience of the hospital and the babies’ deaths, and it details the complex grieving process afterward, including themes of anger, distance, relationship stress, self-blame, religious challenges, and resignation. A methodological appendix explains the process of constructing the comic and provides a rationale for the use of comics-based research for illness, death, and grief among practitioners, policy makers, and the bereaved.
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  32. Experience of Non-Breastfeeding Mothers.Jessica Nihlén Fahlquist - 2016 - Nursing Ethics 23 (2):231-241.
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  33. Dogs and Monsters: Moral Status Claims in the Fiction of Dean Koontz.Stephen W. Smith - 2016 - Journal of Medical Humanities 37 (1):35-51.
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  34. Induced Abortions in Pakistan: Expositions, Destinations and Repercussions. A Qualitative Descriptive Study in Rawalpindi District.Zaeema Naveed, Babar Tasneem Shaikh & Muhammad Asif Nawaz - 2016 - Journal of Biosocial Science 48 (5):631-646.
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  35. The Bad Habit of Bearing Children.H. Theixos & S. B. Jamil - 2014 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (1):35-45.
    The decision to procreate—to have, raise, and nurture biological children—is almost never subject to moral scrutiny. In fact, most societies implicitly embrace and advance procreation, a view known as pronatalism: procreation is morally desirable, psychologically “normal,” and generally seen as a laudable life choice. Those who cannot procreate are understood to have suffered a severe loss, and having or desiring to have children is considered an important developmental marker of increasing maturity and progression toward adulthood.However, we argue that prospective parents (...)
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  36. “Harvesting” and Use of Human Stem Cells: An Islamic Evaluation.Anke I. Bouzenita - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):97-108.
    This paper gives insight into the Islamic bioethical discussion on harvesting and using human embryonic and adult stem cells. It describes some of the Islamic legal mechanisms involved in the bioethical discourse among Muslims. As the contemporary Islamic bioethical discourse is very diverse, the paper focuses on the critical discussion of related resolutions of the Saudi-based Islamic Fiqh Academy due to the esteem in which the IFA is held in the Islamic world and the pertinence of their rulings on this (...)
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  37. The Value of Vagueness in the Politics of Authorship.Bart Penders - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):13-15.
  38. Foetal Surgery and Using in Utero Therapies to Reduce the Degree of Disability After Birth. Could It Be Morally Defensible or Even Morally Required?Constantinos Kanaris - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (1):131-146.
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  39. Erratum To: Hard to Believe: Produced by Ken Stone and Irene Silber, 2015, Swoop Films and Stone Soup Productions.Holly Louise Northam - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (4):591-591.
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  40. Composing Disability: Diagnosis, Interrupted.Abby Wilkerson, Joseph Fisher & Wade Fletcher - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (4):473-476.
    Writing is central both to the medical diagnostic codification of disability and to disabled people’s efforts to interrupt, complicate, or disrupt dominant medical narratives. This Symposium, like the George Washington University conference from which it takes its name, creates space for diverse modes and genres of claiming authority regarding diagnosis and its cultural and material effects. “Queer” and “crip” interrogations of diagnosis illuminate its status as a cultural phenomenon, embracing culturally disavowed embodiments and embodied experiences as tools for diagnosing inegalitarian (...)
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  41. The Ethics of Embryonic Stem Cell Research Katrien Devolder, 2015 Oxford, Oxford University Press 167 Pp., £30. [REVIEW]Jeanne Snelling - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (3):640-642.
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  42. To Lie or Not to Lie? The Influence of Parenting and Theory-of-Mind Understanding on Three-Year-Old Children’s Honesty.Fengling Ma, Angela D. Evans, Ying Liu, Xianming Luo & Fen Xu - 2015 - Journal of Moral Education 44 (2):1-15.
    Prior studies have demonstrated that social-cognitive factors such as children’s false-belief understanding and parenting style are related to children’s lie-telling behaviors. The present study aimed to investigate how earlier forms of theory-of-mind understanding contribute to children’s lie-telling as well as how parenting practices are related to children’s antisocial lie-telling behaviors. Seventy-three three-year-olds from Hangzhou, P. R. China were asked not to peek at a toy in the experimenter’s absence. The majority of children who peeked, lied about it. Children’s lies were (...)
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  43. The Metaphysical Status of the Embryo: Some Arguments Revisited.David Oderberg - unknown
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  44. The Substance View: A Critique (Part 3).Rob Lovering - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (4):305-312.
    In my articles ‘The Substance View: A Critique’ and ‘The Substance View: A Critique,’ I raise objections to the substance view, a theory of intrinsic value and moral standing defended by a number of contemporary moral philosophers, including Robert P. George, Patrick Lee, Christopher Tollefsen, and Francis Beckwith. In part one of my critique of the substance view, I raise reductio-style objections to the substance view's conclusion that the standard human fetus has the same intrinsic value and moral standing as (...)
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  45. Ethics, Sexual Orientation, and Choices About Children by Timothy F. Murphy, 2012 Cambridge, MA: MIT Press 200 Pp, £18.95. [REVIEW]David Archard - 2013 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):187-189.
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  46. Theological Bioethics: Participation, Justice, and Change. [REVIEW]Jason T. Eberl - 2009 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (4):615-618.
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  47. Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques: Who Are the Potential Users and Will They Benefit?Cathy Herbrand - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (1):46-54.
    In February 2015 the UK became the first country to legalise high-profile mitochondrial replacement techniques, which involve the creation of offspring using genetic material from three individuals. The aim of these new cell reconstruction techniques is to prevent the transmission of maternally inherited mitochondrial disorders to biological offspring. During the UK debates, MRTs were often positioned as a straightforward and unique solution for the ‘eradication’ of mitochondrial disorders, enabling hundreds of women to have a healthy, biologically-related child. However, many questions (...)
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  48. Human Nuclear Genome Transfer : Clearing the Underbrush.Françoise Baylis - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (1):7-19.
    In this article, I argue that there is no compelling therapeutic ‘need’ for human nuclear genome transfer to prevent mitochondrial diseases caused by mtDNA mutations. At most there is a strong interest in this technology on the part of some women and couples at risk of having children with mitochondrial disease, and perhaps also a ‘want’ on the part of some researchers who see the technology as a useful precedent – one that provides them with ‘a quiet way station’ in (...)
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  49. Resolving the Debate on Libertarianism and Abortion.Jan Narveson - 2016 - Libertarian Papers 8:267-272.
    I take issue with the view that libertarian theory does not imply any particular stand on abortion. Liberty is the absence of interference with people’s wills—interests, wishes, and desires. Only entities that have such are eligible for the direct rights of libertarian theory. Foetuses do not; and if aborted, there is then no future person whose rights are violated. Hence the “liberal” view of abortion: women (especially) may decide whether to bear the children they have conceived. Birth is a good (...)
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  50. Review of Matthew L. Baum, The Neuroethics of Biomarkers: What the Development of Bioprediction Means for Moral Responsibility, Justice, and the Nature of Mental Disorder1. [REVIEW]Ryan H. Nelson - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):20-22.
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