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Subcategories:History/traditions: Reproductive Ethics

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  1. New Zealand Policy on Frozen Embryo Disputes.Carolyn Mason - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (1):121-131.
    Disputes between separated couples over whether frozen embryos can be used in an attempt to create a child create a moral dilemma for public policy. When a couple create embryos intending to parent any resulting children, New Zealand’s current policy requires the consent of both people at every stage of the ART process. New Zealand’s Advisory Committee on Assisted Reproductive Technology has proposed a policy change that would give ex-partners involved in an embryo dispute twelve months to come to an (...)
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  2. Do Mothers of Extremely Preterm Babies Have a Duty to Express Breastmilk?Fiona Woollard - forthcoming - Acta Paediatrica 1 (00).
    Infant feeding decisions are highly emotionally charged. I argue elsewhere that many problems surrounding infant feeding decisions result from a moralized context created by mistakes in our assumptions about maternal duties including the mistaken assumption that mothers have a defeasible moral duty to breastfeed. Mothers have a reason, but not a moral duty to breastfeed. Even those who are convinced by my argument in the case of full-term babies, might find it harder to accept in the case of premature babies. (...)
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  3. Genetic Selective Abortion: Still a Matter of Choice.Bruce P. Blackshaw - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-11.
    Jeremy Williams has argued that if we are committed to a liberal pro-choice stance with regard to selective abortion for disability, we will be unable to justify the prohibition of sex selective abortion. Here, I apply his reasoning to selective abortion based on other traits pregnant women may decide are undesirable. These include susceptibility to disease, level of intelligence, physical appearance, sexual orientation, religious belief and criminality—in fact any traits attributable to some degree to a genetic component. Firstly, I review (...)
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  4. Legal Punishment, Abortion and the Substance View.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - The New Bioethics:1-3.
    A response to Henrik Friberg-Fernros' commentary on ‘The Ethics of Killing: Strengthening the Substance View with Time-relative Interests’.
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  5. From Dusk Till Dawn: Bioethical Insights Into the Beginning and the End of Life.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2019 - Berlin, Germany: Logos Verlag.
    From Dawn till Dusk embraces the conceptual challenges often associated with Bioethics by taking the reader on a journey that embodies the circle of life and what it means to be human. The beginning and the end of life have always been an impossible riddle to humans. Bioethics does not aspire to unveil utter truths regarding the purpose of our existence; on the contrary, its task is to settle controversial issues that arise within this finite, very fragile and vulnerable life, (...)
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  6. Eugenics Undefended.Robert A. Wilson - 2019 - Monash Bioethics Review 37 (1-2):68-75.
    This is a critical response to "Defending Eugenics", published in MBR in 2018.
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  7. Double Effect & Ectopic Pregnancy – Some Problems.Michal Pruski - 2019 - Catholic Medical Quarterly 69 (2):17-20.
    This paper looks at the Catholic justification of medical interventions in ectopic pregnancies. The paper first shows that the way how Double Effect Reasoning is often applied to ectopic pregnancies is not consistent with the way Aquinas introduces this mode of reasoning. The paper then shows certain problems in common defences of the use of salpingectomies. The paper then re-evaluates the medical interventions used in the management of ectopic pregnancies, with both a focus on the aim of the treatment and (...)
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  8. The Relationship of Gametes to Those Who Procreate and Its Impact on Artificially Generated Gamete Technologies.Michal Pruski - 2017 - Ethics and Medicine 33 (1):27-41.
    Current developments in reproductive technology forecast that in the foreseeable future artificially generated gametes might be presented as a possible fertility treatment for infertile couples and for homosexual couples desiring to have children genetically originating from both partners. It is important to evaluate the ethical issues connected to this technology before its emergence. This article first reviews the meaning that gametes (sperm and eggs) might have to those who procreate, as well as their ontology. From this, suggestions are made as (...)
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  9. Genetic Parenthood and Causation: An Objection to Douglas and Devolder’s Modified Direct Proportionate Genetic Descent Account.César Palacios‐González - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (9):1085-1090.
    In a recent publication Tom Douglas and Katrien Devolder have proposed a new account of genetic parenthood, building on the work of Heidi Mertes. Douglas and Devolder’s account aims to solve, among other things, the question of who are the genetic parents of an individual created through somatic cell nuclear transfer (i.e. cloning): (a) the nuclear DNA provider or (b) the progenitors of the nuclear DNA provider. Such a question cannot be answered by simply appealing to the folk account of (...)
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  10. Conscience in Reproductive Health Care: Prioritizing Patient Interests.Carolyn McLeod - 2020 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Conscience in Reproductive Health Care responds to the growing worldwide trend of health care professionals conscientiously refusing to provide abortions and similar reproductive health services in countries where these services are legal and professionally accepted. Carolyn McLeod argues that conscientious objectors in health care should prioritize the interests of patients in receiving care over their own interest in acting on their conscience. She defends this "prioritizing approach" to conscientious objection over the more popular "compromise approach" without downplaying the importance of (...)
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  11. Meeting the Epicurean Challenge: A Reply to Christensen.Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (7):478-479.
    In ’Abortion and deprivation: a reply to Marquis’, Anna Christensen contends that Don Marquis’ influential ’future like ours’ argument for the immorality of abortion faces a significant challenge from the Epicurean claim that human beings cannot be harmed by their death. If deprivation requires a subject, then abortion cannot deprive a fetus of a future of value, as no individual exists to be deprived once death has occurred. However, the Epicurean account also implies that the wrongness of murder is also (...)
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  12. The Subjects of Ectogenesis: Are “Gestatelings” Fetuses, Newborns, or Neither?Nick Colgrove - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (11):723-726.
    Subjects of ectogenesis—human beings that are developing in artificial wombs (AWs)—share the same moral status as newborns. To demonstrate this, I defend two claims. First, subjects of partial ectogenesis—those that develop in utero for a time before being transferred to AWs—are newborns (in the full sense of the word). Second, subjects of complete ectogenesis—those who develop in AWs entirely—share the same moral status as newborns. To defend the first claim, I rely on Elizabeth Chloe Romanis’s distinctions between fetuses, newborns and (...)
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  13. Looking Into the Shadow: The Eugenics Argument in Debates on Reproductive Technologies and Practices.Giulia Cavaliere - 2018 - Monash Bioethics Review 36 (1-4):1-22.
    Eugenics is often referred to in debates on the ethics of reproductive technologies and practices, in relation to the creation of moral boundaries between acceptable and unacceptable technologies, and acceptable and unacceptable uses of these technologies. Historians have argued that twentieth century eugenics cannot be reduced to a uniform set of practices, and that no simple lessons can be drawn from this complex history. Some authors stress the similarities between past eugenics and present reproductive technologies and practices (what I define (...)
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  14. Direct and Indirect Abortion in the Roman Catholic Tradition: A Review of the Phoenix Case. [REVIEW]Gerald D. Coleman S. S. - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (2):127-143.
    In Roman Catholic Moral Theology, a direct abortion is never permitted. An indirect abortion, in which a life threatening pathology is treated, and the treatment inadvertently leads to the death of the fetus, may be permissible in proportionately grave situations. In situations in which a mother’s life is endangered by the pregnancy before the fetus is viable, there is some debate about whether the termination of the pregnancy is a direct or indirect abortion. In this essay a recent case from (...)
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  15. Das Verhältnis von Abtreibung Und Transplantation Fetalen Hirngewebes: Eine Mittel-Zweck-Beziehung?The Relation Between Abortion and Transplantation of Fetal Tissue: A Means to an End?Matthias Kliegel - 1999 - Ethik in der Medizin 11 (3):162-168.
    Definition of the Problem: One of the main ethical arguments against the therapeutic transplantation of fetal tissue in severe cases of Parkinson’s disease is the allegation that the relationship between the abortion and the transplantation is a (bad)-means-to-a-(good)-end-relation.Arguments: This paper differentiates between the actual experimental single-case treatment and a potential mass treatment. In the former case, ethical guidelines seem to guarantee that abortion and transplantation are two distinct actions and therefore abortion is not a means to the end transplantation on (...)
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  16. Abortion Practice in Britain and the United States. By Francome. Colin £18·00 , £7·95.Peter Diggory - 1987 - Journal of Biosocial Science 19 (2):251-251.
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  17. Nonideal Theory, Self-Respect, and Preimplantation Genetic Technologies.Clair Morrissey & Elena Neale - 2019 - In E. Sills & Gianpiero Palermo (eds.), Human Embryos and Preimplantation Genetic Technologies. pp. 67-74.
    We suggest a fuller understanding of the obligation to respect patient autonomy can be gained by recognizing patients as historically and socially situated agents, whose values are developed, challenged, and changed, rather than merely applied, in their decision-making about their use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis or preimplantation genetic screening (PGD/PGS). We ground this discussion in empirical research on the patients experiences with PGD/PGS, and conclude by suggesting that promoting patients’ self-respect is a useful ethical standard for providers and practices to (...)
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  18. Educational Inequalities in Repeat Abortion: A Longitudinal Register Study in Finland 1975–2010.Heini Väisänen - 2016 - Journal of Biosocial Science 48 (6):820-832.
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  19. Gradualistische Konzepte Und Alternativen in der Embryonendebatte *Gradualistic Concepts and Their Alternatives in the Debate on Embryos.Katja Wagner-Westerhausen - 2008 - Ethik in der Medizin 20 (1):6-16.
    Dem Personbegriff wird als Grundlage zur Bewertung bioethischer Konfliktfälle wie der Frage nach dem moralischen Status menschlicher Embryonen eine Schlüsselfunktion zugewiesen. Zugleich ist seine Verwendungsweise stark umstritten. Ein Konsens ist angesichts der hitzig geführten Debatten nicht in Aussicht. Die Wertepluralität spiegelt sich nicht zuletzt in der uneinheitlichen – und damit unbefriedigenden – deutschen Rechtslage wider. Angesichts der Dringlichkeit, die bioethische Debatte nach dem vorläufigen Scheitern des Personbegriffs intern aufzubrechen, diskutiert der vorliegende Beitrag, in wie fern Argumenttypen, die nicht unmittelbar bei (...)
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  20. Book Review: Feminism & Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction. [REVIEW]Leslie Bender - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (1):58-61.
  21. In Vitro Gametogenesis: The End of Egg Donation?Sarah Carter‐Walshaw - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (1):60-67.
    This paper explores whether egg donation could still be ethically justified if in vitro gametogenesis (IVG) became reliable and safe. In order to do this, issues and concerns that might inform a patient’s reasoning in choosing to use donor eggs instead of IVG are explored and assessed. It is concluded that egg donation would only be ethically justified in a narrow range of special cases given the (hypothetical) availability of IVG treatment and, further, that egg donation could itself be replaced (...)
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  22. The Need for Donor Consent in Mitochondrial Replacement.G. Owen Schaefer - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (12):825-829.
    Mitochondrial replacement therapy requires oocytes of women whose mitochondrial DNA will be transmitted to resultant children. These techniques are scientifically, ethically and socially controversial; it is likely that some women who donate their oocytes for general in vitro fertilisation usage would nevertheless oppose their genetic material being used in MRT. The possibility of oocytes being used in MRT is therefore relevant to oocyte donation and should be included in the consent process when applicable. In present circumstances, specific consent should be (...)
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  23. Justicia Intergeneracional: ensayos desde el pensamiento de Lukas H. Meyer.Santiago Truccone Borgogno (ed.) - 2017 - Córdoba, Cordoba, Argentina: Editorial Universidad Nacional de Cordoba.
    Hasta hace no mucho tiempo, la mayor parte de nuestras discusiones sobre derechos y obligaciones giraba en relación a lo que le debemos a nuestros contemporáneos, sean estos conciudadanos o habitantes de otras partes del mundo. Este libro intenta adentrarse en el estudio de la cuestión intergeneracional e incluye, por un lado, las discusiones referidas a nuestras obligaciones para con las personas futuras; y, por el otro, a aquellas derivadas de la comisión de actos de injusticia por parte de determinados (...)
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  24. ‘Women-Protective’ Language as a Tool of Exclusion: Debates on Oocyte Donation in Latvia.Signe Mezinska & Ilze Mileiko - 2018 - European Journal of Women's Studies:1-14.
    ‘Women-protective’ language is broadly used as a frame in political discussions on women’s reproductive healthcare and labour rights. This article addresses the use of ‘women-protective’ language in online news articles in the Latvian media about the proposed prohibition of oocyte donation for nulliparous women. The main focus of the recent Latvian debate has not been on the technology itself, but rather on the female body and women’s rationality and decision-making capacity. The results of the analysis show that use of the (...)
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  25. Review of Challenging Nature: The Clash of Science and Spirituality at the New Frontiers of Life by Lee M. Silver. [REVIEW]W. Malcolm Byrnes - 2007 - Worldviews: Environment, Culture, Religion 11:248-253.
  26. Why Governance? A Challenge to Good Governance of Biobanks.Katharine Browne - 2015 - Monash Bioethics Review 33 (4):295-300.
    In this commentary on Karla Stroud and Kieran O’Doherty’s ‘Ethically Sustainable Governance in the Biobanking of Eggs and Embryos for Research’ (2015) I call into question the need for good governance to overcome the challenges facing biobanking of eggs and embryos. I argue that the principles of good governance for biobanking that Stroud and O’Doherty outline come up short in providing concrete normative guidance to resolve the challenges associated with a biobank for eggs and embryos.
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  27. The Quest for Human Dignity in the Ethics of Pregnancy Termination.Tom J. Obengo (ed.) - 2016 - Eugene, Oregon, USA: Wipf & Stock.
    This study describes and analyses the problem of termination of pregnancy, with special attention to its prevalence in Kenya, where more than seven hundred abortions are performed daily on girls between fifteen and seventeen years of age. Although pregnancy termination is illegal in Kenya, its practice goes on in the rural villages, in homes, in urban streets and in private clinics. The book focuses on the ethical quest for human dignity in the context of the church’s response to the challenge (...)
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  28. The Ethics of Embryonic Stem Cell Research Katrien Devolder, 2015 Oxford, Oxford University Press 167 Pp., £30. [REVIEW]Jeanne Snelling - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (3):640-642.
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  29. The Ethics of Embryonic Stem Cell Research Katrien Devolder, 2015 Oxford, Oxford University Press 167 Pp., £30. [REVIEW]Jeanne Snelling - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (3):640-642.
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  30. A Defense of Abortion. [REVIEW]Rob Lovering - 2003 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 20:214-17.
    This is a review of David Boonin's A Defense of Abortion (Cambridge University Press, 2002).
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  31. Rethinking Reprogenetics: Enhancing Ethical Analyses of Reprogenetic Technologies.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2017 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Reprogenetic technologies, which combine the power of reproductive techniques with the tools of genetic science and technology, promise prospective parents a remarkable degree of control to pick and choose the likely characteristics of their offspring. Not only can they select embryos with or without particular genetically-related diseases and disabilities but also choose embryos with non-disease related traits such as sex. -/- Prominent authors such as Agar, Buchanan, DeGrazia, Green, Harris, Robertson, Savulescu, and Silver have flocked to the banner of reprogenetics. (...)
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  32. Motherhood in the Context of Normative Discourse: Birth Stories of Mothers of Children with Down Syndrome.Susan L. Gabel & Kathy Kotel - 2018 - Journal of Medical Humanities 39 (2):179-193.
    Using birth stories as our object of inquiry, this article examines the ways in which normative discourses about gender, disability and Down syndrome construct the birth stories of three mothers of children with Down syndrome. Their stories are composed of the mothers’ recollections of the first hours after birth as a time when their infants are separated from them and their postpartum needs are ignored. Together, their stories illustrate socio-cultural tropes that position Down syndrome as a dangerous form of the (...)
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  33. Reconceiving Abortion: Medical Practice, Women's Access, and Feminist Politics Before and After "Roe V. Wade"When Abortion Was a Crime: Women, Medicine, and the Law in the United States, 1867-1973The Abortionist: A Woman Against the LawThe Story of Jane: The Legendary Underground Feminist Abortion ServiceDoctors of Conscience: The Struggle to Provide Abortion Before and After "Roe V. Wade."Abortion Wars: A Half-Century of Struggle, 1950-2000Beyond Pro-Life and Pro-Choice: Moral Diversity in the Abortion Debate. [REVIEW]Johanna Schoen, Leslie J. Reagan, Rickie Solinger, Laura Kaplan, Carol Joffe & Kathy Rudy - 2000 - Feminist Studies 26 (2):349.
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  34. At Law: Punishing Mothers.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28 (1):31.
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  35. Capital Report: Doing Things with Embryos.Joseph Palca - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (1):5.
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  36. At Law: Grandma? No, I'm the Mother!Alexander Morgan Capron - 1994 - Hastings Center Report 24 (2):24.
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  37. At Law: Crazy Making: Embryos and Gestational Mothers.George J. Annas - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (1):35.
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  38. At Law: Outrageous Fortune: Selling Other People's Cells.George J. Annas - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (6):36.
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  39. At Law: Webster and the Politics of Abortion.George J. Annas - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (2):36.
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  40. Case Studies: 'My Husband Won't Tell the Children!'.Nancy Neveloff Dubler & Lawrence J. Schneiderman - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (4):26.
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  41. Law and the Life Sciences: Redefining Parenthood and Protecting Embryos: Why We Need New Laws.George J. Annas - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (5):50.
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  42. Law and the Life Sciences: Surrogate Embryo Transfer: The Perils of Patenting.George J. Annas - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (3):25.
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  43. Law and the Life Sciences: 'Transfer Trauma' & the Right to a Hearing.George J. Annas - 1980 - Hastings Center Report 10 (6):23.
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  44. Law and the Life Sciences: The Supreme Court and Abortion: The Irrelevance of Medical Judgment.George J. Annas - 1980 - Hastings Center Report 10 (5):23.
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  45. Having Children. [REVIEW]Margaret O'Brien Steinfels - 1979 - Hastings Center Report 9 (2):29.
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  46. Technology and the 'Good Old Docs'. [REVIEW]Robert S. Morison - 1978 - Hastings Center Report 8 (4):44.
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  47. Law and the Life Sciences: Abortion and the Supreme Court: Round Two.George J. Annas - 1976 - Hastings Center Report 6 (5):15.
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  48. Case Studies in Bioethics: Baby Making and the Public Interest.Theodore Tsukahara & Seymour Siegel - 1976 - Hastings Center Report 6 (4):13.
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  49. My Mother Wasn't.Shirley Geok-Lin Lim - 1996 - Feminist Studies 22 (3):553.
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  50. Between Parents.Joan Cusack Handler - 1994 - Feminist Studies 20 (1):86.
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