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  1. Review Essay of Contingent Future Persons, Jan C. Heller and Nick Fotion, Eds. [REVIEW]Stuart Rachels - - 1999 - Bioethics 13:160-167.
    This essay critically comments on Contingent Future Persons (1997), an anthology of thirteen papers on the same topic as Obligations to Future Generations (1978), namely, the morality of decisions affecting the existence, number and identity of future persons. In my discussion, I identify the basic point of dispute between R. M. Hare and Michael Lockwood on potentiality; I criticize Nick Fotion's thesis that the Repugnant Conclusion is too far-fetched to be philosophically valuable; I object to Clark Wolf's "Impure Consequentialist Theory (...)
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  2. The Moral Significance of the Genetic Relation.Edmund Abegg - 1984 - Journal of Medical Humanities 5 (2):127-144.
    Our ordinary moral attitudes give a prominent place to the principle that each person ought specially to care for any child who is his or her genetic offspring. From this principle of genetic-parental responsibility and other plausible premises, we can derive the principle that each person has the right to control the genetic use of his or her own genes. But there are competing principles of parental responsibility that require consideration. Principles of nurture are among the important competitors. Also, the (...)
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  3. A Stalemate on Test‐Tube Baby Research.Susan Abramowitz - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (1):5-9.
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  4. Response: The Commodification of Women's Bodies in Trafficking for Prostitution and Egg Donation.Liliana Acero - 2009 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (1):25 - 32.
  5. The Commodification of Women's Bodies in Trafficking for Prostitution and Egg Donation.Liliana Acero - 2009 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (1):25-32.
  6. The Dilemma of Revealing Sensitive Information on Paternity Status in Arabian Social and Cultural Contexts.Abdallah A. Adlan & Henk Amj ten Have - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (4):403-409.
    Telling the truth is one of the most respected virtues in medical history and one of the most emphasized in the code of medical ethics. Health care providers are frequently confronted with the dilemma as to whether or not to tell the truth. This dilemma deepens when both choices are critically vicious: The choice is no longer between “right and right” or “right and wrong,” it is between “wrong and wrong.” In the case presented and discussed in this paper, a (...)
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  7. What Motivates Women to Take Part in Clinical and Basic Science Endometriosis Research?Sanjay K. Agarwal, Sylvia Estrada, Warren G. Foster, L. Lewis Wall, Doug Brown, Elaine S. Revis & Suzanne Rodriguez - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (5):263–269.
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  8. The Harm Argument Against Surrogacy Revisited: Two Versions Not to Forget.Marcus Agnafors - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (3):357-363.
    It has been a common claim that surrogacy is morally problematic since it involves harm to the child or the surrogate—the harm argument. Due to a growing body of empirical research, the harm argument has seen a decrease in popularity, as there seems to be little evidence of harmful consequences of surrogacy. In this article, two revised versions of the harm argument are developed. It is argued that the two suggested versions of the harm argument survive the current criticism against (...)
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  9. Do Motives Matter in Male Circumcision? 'Conscientious Objection' Against the Circumcision of a Muslim Child with a Blood Disorder.Ayesha Ahmad - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (2):67-75.
    Whilst there have been serious attempts to locate the practice of male circumcision for religious motives in the context of the (respective) religion's narrative and community, the debate, when referring to a clinical context, is often more nuanced. This article will contribute further to the debate by contextualising the Islamic practice of male circumcision within the clinical setting typical of a contemporary hospital. It specifically develops an additional complication; namely, the child has a pre-existing blood disorder. As an approach to (...)
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  10. On Being Genetically "Irresponsible".Judith Andre, Leonard M. Fleck & Thomas Tomlinson - 2000 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (2):129-146.
    : New genetic technologies continue to emerge that allow us to control the genetic endowment of future children. Increasingly the claim is made that it is morally "irresponsible" for parents to fail to use such technologies when they know their possible children are at risk for a serious genetic disorder. We believe such charges are often unwarranted. Our goal in this article is to offer a careful conceptual analysis of the language of irresponsibility in an effort to encourage more care (...)
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  11. The Ethical Challenges of the Clinical Introduction of Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques.John B. Appleby - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (4):501-514.
    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diseases are a group of neuromuscular diseases that often cause suffering and premature death. New mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRTs) may offer women with mtDNA diseases the opportunity to have healthy offspring to whom they are genetically related. MRTs will likely be ready to license for clinical use in the near future and a discussion of the ethics of the clinical introduction ofMRTs is needed. This paper begins by evaluating three concerns about the safety of MRTs for clinical (...)
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  12. The 'Healthy' Embryo: Social, Biomedical, Legal and Philosophical Perspectives.Adrienne Asch & David Wasserman - 2010
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  13. Reproblematising Relations of Agency and Coercion: Surrogacy.S. Ashenden - 2013 - In Sumi Madhok, Anne Phillips & Kalpana Wilson (eds.), Gender, Agency, and Coercion. Palgrave-Macmillan.
  14. Philosophical Reflections on Medical Ethics.Nafsika Athanassoulis (ed.) - 2005 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This collection brings together original essays demonstrating the cutting edge of philosophical research in medical ethics. With contributions from a range of established and up-and-coming authors, it examines topics at the forefront of medical technology, such as ethical issues raised by developments in how we research stem cells and genetic engineering, as well as new questions raised by methodological changes in how we approach medical ethics.
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  15. Medical Ethics in the Age of Technology.Tom L. Beauchamp - 1987 - In Hans Mark & W. Lawson Taitte (eds.), Traditional Moral Values in the Age of Technology. the University of Texas Press.
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  16. Reproductive and Parental Autonomy: An Argument for Compulsory Parental Education.Lisa Bortolotti & Daniela Cutas - 2009 - Reproductive Biomedicine Online 19 (ethics suppl.):5-14.
    In this paper we argue that society should make available reliable information about parenting to everybody from an early age. The reason why parental education is important (when offered in a comprehensive and systematic way) is that it can help young people understand better the responsibilities associated with reproduction, and the skills required for parenting. This would allow them to make more informed life-choices about reproduction and parenting, and exercise their autonomy with respect to these choices. We do not believe (...)
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  17. Disability, Enhancement and the Harm -Benefit Continuum.Lisa Bortolotti & John Harris - 2006 - In John R. Spencer & Antje Du Bois-Pedain (eds.), Freedom and Responsibility in Reproductive Choice. Hart Publishers.
    Suppose that you are soon to be a parent and you learn that there are some simple measures that you can take to make sure that your child will be healthy. In particular, suppose that by following the doctor’s advice, you can prevent your child from having a disability, you can make your child immune from a number of dangerous diseases and you can even enhance its future intelligence. All that is required for this to happen is that you (or (...)
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  18. Reproductive Cloning in Humans and Therapeutic Cloning in Primates: Is the Ethical Debate Catching Up with the Recent Scientific Advances?S. Camporesi & L. Bortolotti - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e15-e15.
    After years of failure, in November 2007 primate embryonic stem cells were derived by somatic cellular nuclear transfer, also known as therapeutic cloning. The first embryo transfer for human reproductive cloning purposes was also attempted in 2006, albeit with negative results. These two events force us to think carefully about the possibility of human cloning which is now much closer to becoming a reality. In this paper we tackle this issue from two sides, first summarising what scientists have achieved so (...)
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  19. Conscientious Objection and Emergency Contraception.Robert F. Card - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):8 – 14.
    This article argues that practitioners have a professional ethical obligation to dispense emergency contraception, even given conscientious objection to this treatment. This recent controversy affects all medical professionals, including physicians as well as pharmacists. This article begins by analyzing the option of referring the patient to another willing provider. Objecting professionals may conscientiously refuse because they consider emergency contraception to be equivalent to abortion or because they believe contraception itself is immoral. This article critically evaluates these reasons and concludes that (...)
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  20. Life, Technology, and Law: Second Forum for Transnational and Comparative Legal Dialogue, Levico Terme, Italy, June 9-10, 2006: Proceedings. [REVIEW]Carlo Casonato (ed.) - 2007 - Cedam.
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  21. A Avaliação de Crianças Para Adoção; Children Evaluation for Adoption.Verônica Petersen Chaves - 2001 - Aletheia 13:27-42.
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  22. Natural Versus Assisted Reproduction. In Search of Fairness.Daniela Cutas & Lisa Bortolotti - 2010 - Studies in Ethics, Law and Technology 4 (1).
    Whilst the choice of becoming a parent in the natural way is unregulated all over Europe (and proposals of regulation raise vehement objections), most European countries have (either legal or professional) regulations imposing criteria that people must satisfy if they wish to gain access to assisted reproduction and parenting. These criteria may include relationship status, age, sexual orientation, financial stability, health, and willingness to attend parenting classes. The existence of regulations in this area is largely accepted, and the objections raised (...)
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  23. Families – Beyond the Nuclear Ideal.Daniela Cutas & Sarah Chan - 2012 - Bloomsbury Academic.
    This book examines, through a multi-disciplinary lens, the possibilities offered by relationships and family forms that challenge the nuclear family ideal, and some of the arguments that recommend or disqualify these as legitimate units in our societies. That children should be conceived naturally, born to and raised by their two young, heterosexual, married to each other, genetic parents; that this relationship between parents is also the ideal relationship between romantic or sexual partners; and that romance and sexual intimacy ought to (...)
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  24. When the Milk of Human Kindness Becomes a Luxury (and Untested) Good. A Reply to Harris’ Unconditional Embrace of Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (1):159-165.
    A new reprogenetic technology, mitochondrial replacement, is making its appearance and, unsurprisingly given its promise to wash off our earthly stains --or at least the scourges of sexual reproduction--, John Harris finds only reasons to celebrate this new scientific feat.1 In fact, he finds mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRTs) so “unreservedly welcome” that he believes those who reject them suffer from “a large degree of desperation and not a little callousness.”2 Believing myself to be neither desperate nor callous, but finding myself (...)
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  25. A Parental Duty to Use PGD: More Than We Bargained For?Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (4):14-15.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 4, Page 14-15, April 2012.
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  26. Assisted Reproductive Technology in Spain: Considering Women's Interests.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (3):228.
    It might come as a surprise to many that Spain, a country with a strong Catholic tradition that officially banned contraceptive technologies until 1978, has some of the most liberal regulations in assisted reproduction in the world. Law No. 35/1988 was one of the first and most detailed acts of legislation undertaken on the subject of assisted-conception procedures. Indeed, not only did the law permit research on nonviable embryos, it made assisted reproductive technologies available to any woman, whether married or (...)
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  27. On Our Obligation to Select the Best Children: A Reply to Savulescu.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2004 - Bioethics 18 (1):72–83.
  28. The Right to Life and Abortion Legislation in England and Wales: A Proposal for Change.Jan Deckers - 2010 - Diametros 26:1-22.
    In England and Wales, there is significant controversy on the law related to abortion. Recent discussions have focussed predominantly on the health professional's right to conscientious objection. This article argues for a comprehensive overhaul of the law from the perspective of an author who adopts the view that all unborn human beings should be granted the prima facie right to life. It is argued that, should the law be modified in accordance with this stance, it need not imply that health (...)
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  29. Reproduktionstechnologien und Bionormative Familienkonzeptionen.Ezio Di Nucci - forthcoming - In Handbuch Philosophie der Kindheit.
  30. Contraception and Double Effect.Ezio Di Nucci - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (7):42-43.
  31. Metaphysical and Moral Status of Cryopreserved Embryos.Jason T. Eberl - 2012 - The Linacre Quarterly 79 (3):304-315.
    Those who oppose human embryonic stem cell research argue for a clear position on the metaphysical and moral status of human embryos. This position does not differ whether the embryo is present inside its mother’s reproductive tract or in a cryopreservation tank. It is worth examining, however, whether an embryo in “suspended animation” has the same status as one actively developing in utero. I will explore this question from the perspective of Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysical account of human nature. I conclude (...)
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  32. Neuromaturation of the Human Fetus.Michael J. Flower - 1985 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (3):237-252.
    The fetal human possesses an active central nervous system from at least the eighth week of development. Until mid-gestation the most significant center of activity is the brainstem. By the end of the first trimester, it appears that the brainstem could be acting as a rudimentary modulator of sensory information and motor activity. What importance ought to be attached to such regulatory activity is uncertain. Some argue that it represents a level of integrated activity sufficient to bolster an argument for (...)
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  33. Review of Christine Overall, Why Have Children? The Ethical Debate. [REVIEW]Rachel Fredericks - 2013 - Hypatia Reviews Online.
  34. Ms.Stephanie Gagnon - manuscript
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  35. Problems and Solutions for a Hypothetical Right Not to Exist.Manolito Gallegos - 2011 - Logoi -- Heidelberger Graduiertenjournal für Geisteswissenschaften 1 (1):N/A.
    In this paper I will describe and attempt to resolve one of the main problems of David Benatar’s text "Better Never To Have Been: The Harm of Coming Into Existence": whether it is possible for a right not to exist to be posited without there ever being a person in existence to hold such a right. I will conclude that this is indeed possible given an experience oriented view of personhood that I shall outline, and what other conclusions might be (...)
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  36. 27 External Human Fertilization: An Evaluation of Policy.Clifford Grobstein, Michael Flower & John Mendeloff - forthcoming - Bioethics: Basic Writings on the Key Ethical Questions That Surround the Major, Modern Biological Possibilities and Problems.
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  37. The Gift of the Other: Levinas and the Politics of Reproduction.Lisa Guenther - 2006 - SUNY Press.
    The Gift of the Other brings together a philosophical analysis of time, embodiment, and ethical responsibility with a feminist critique of the way women’s reproductive capacity has been theorized and represented in Western culture. Author Lisa Guenther develops the ethical and temporal implications of understanding birth as the gift of the Other, a gift which makes existence possible, and already orients this existence toward a radical responsibility for Others. Through an engagement with the work of Levinas, Beauvoir, Arendt, Irigaray, and (...)
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  38. Unborn Mothers: The Old Rhetoric of New Reproductive Technologies.Lisa Guenther - 2005 - Radical Philosophy 130.
    In 2003, The Guardian newspapers ran an article with the headline, “Prospect of babies from unborn mothers.” A team of Israeli researchers had been attempting to grow viable eggs from the ovarian tissue of aborted fetuses for use in fertility treatments such as IVF. The rhetoric of “unborn mothers” poses new challenges to the liberal feminist discourse of personhood. How do we articulate the ethical issues involved in harvesting eggs from an aborted fetus, without resurrecting the debate over whether this (...)
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  39. Human Dignity and Reproductive Technology.Patrick Guinan, Francis Cardinal George, Jean Bethke Elshtain, John M. Haas, Steven Bozza, Daniel P. Toma, Patrick Lee, William E. May, Richard M. Doerflinger & Gerard V. Bradley - 2003 - Upa.
    The March 2002 symposium Human Dignity and Reproductive Technology brought together philosophers, theologians, scientists, lawyers, and scholars from across the United States. The essays of this book are the contributions of the symposium's participants.
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  40. Culpability and Blame After Pregnancy Loss.Benjamin Hale - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (1):24-27.
    The problem of feeling guilty about a pregnancy loss is suggested to be primarily a moral matter and not a medical or psychological one. Two standard approaches to women who blame themselves for a loss are first introduced, characterised as either psychologistic or deterministic. Both these approaches are shown to underdetermine the autonomy of the mother by depending on the notion that the mother is not culpable for the loss if she "could not have acted otherwise". The inability to act (...)
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  41. Continental Approaches in Bioethics.Melinda C. Hall - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (3):161-172.
    Bioethics influences public policy, scientific research, and clinical practice. Thinkers in Continental traditions have increasingly contributed scholarship to this field, and their approaches allow new insights and alternative normative guidance. In this essay, examples of the following Continental approaches in bioethics are presented and considered: phenomenology and existentialism; deconstruction; Foucauldian methodologies; and biopolitical analyses. Also highlighted are Continental feminisms and the philosophy of disability. Continental approaches are importantly diverse, but those I focus upon here reveal embedded models of individualized autonomy (...)
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  42. Antinatalism, Asymmetry, and an Ethic of Prima Facie Duties.Gerald K. Harrison - 2012 - South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):94-103.
    Benatar’s central argument for antinatalism develops an asymmetry between the pain and pleasure in a potential life. I am going to present an alternative route to the antinatalist conclusion. I argue that duties require victims and that as a result there is no duty to create the pleasures contained within a prospective life but a duty not to create any of its sufferings. My argument can supplement Benatar’s, but it also enjoys some advantages: it achieves a better fit with our (...)
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  43. Better Not to Have Children.Gerald K. Harrison & Julia Tanner - 2011 - Think, 10(27), 113-121 (27):113-121.
    Most people take it for granted that it's morally permissible to have children. They may raise questions about the number of children it's responsible to have or whether it's permissible to reproduce when there's a strong risk of serious disability. But in general, having children is considered a good thing to do, something that's morally permissible in most cases (perhaps even obligatory).
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  44. Retter-Kinder, Instrumentalisierung und Kants Zweckformel.Tim Henning - 2014 - Ethik in der Medizin 26 (3):195-209.
    Definition of the problem The creation and selection of children as tissue donors is ethically controversial. Critics often appeal to Kant’s Formula of Humanity, i.e. the requirement that people be treated not merely as means but as ends in themselves. As many defenders of the procedure point out, these appeals usually do not explain the sense of the requirement and hence remain obscure. Arguments This article proposes an interpretation of Kant’s principle, and it proposes that two different instrumental stances be (...)
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  45. Feminist Perspectives in Medical Ethics.Helen B. Holmes & Laura Purdy (eds.) - 1992 - Indiana University Press.
    The fields of medical ethics, bioethics, and women's studies have experienced unprecedented growth in the last forty years. Along with the rapid pace of development in medicine and biology, and changes in social expectations, moral quandaries about the body and social practices involving it have multiplied. Philosophers are uniquely situated to attempt to clarify and resolves these questions. Yet the subdiscipline of bioethics still in large part reflects mainstream scholars' lack of interest in gender as a category of analysis. This (...)
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  46. Breeders: A Subclass of Women?Breeders: A Subclass of Women? Directed by Jennifer Lahl and Matthew Eppinette. San Ramon, CA: Center for Bioethics and Culture Network, 2014.L. Syd M. Johnson - 2014 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (2):248-253.
  47. Reconsidering the Donohue-Levitt Hypothesis.Samuel Kahn - 2016 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 90 (4):583-620.
    According to the Donohue-Levitt hypothesis, the legalization of abor- tion in the United States in the 1970s explains some of the decrease in crime in the 1990s. In this paper, I challenge this hypothesis. First, I argue against the intermediate mechanisms whereby abortion in the 1970s is supposed to cause a decrease in crime in the 1990s. Second, I argue against the correlations that sup- port this causal relationship.
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  48. Ethics in Reproductive Medicine in the German Democratic Republic.Hannelore Koerner - 1989 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (3):335-341.
    The paper discusses the practice of genetic counseling and elective abortion in the German Democratic Republic. Keywords: elective abortion, embryo transfer, in vitro fertilization, protection of human life, reproductive ethics, German Democratic Republic, bioethics CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this?
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  49. Inter-Species Embryos and Human Clones: Issues of Free Movement and Gestation.Jacqueline A. Laing - 2008 - European Journal of Health Law 15: 421-431.
    The United Kingdom's Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill, introduced into Parliament on the 8th of November 2007 contains a number of controversial proposals inter alia expressly permitting the creation of inter-species embryos for research and destruction and increasing the scope for human cloning also for destructive research. It is supposed that there ought not to be a blanket ban on the creation of human clones, hybrids, cybrids and chimeras because these embryos are valuable for research purposes. The prohibition on the (...)
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  50. Artificial Reproduction, the 'Welfare Principle', and the Common Good.Jacqueline A. Laing - 2005 - Medical Law Review 13:328-356.
    This article challenges the view most recently expounded by Emily Jackson that ‘decisional privacy’ ought to be respected in the realm of artificial reproduction (AR). On this view, it is considered an unjust infringement of individual liberty for the state to interfere with individual or group freedom artificially to produce a child. It is our contention that a proper evaluation of AR and of the relevance of welfare will be sensitive not only to the rights of ‘commissioning parties’ to AR (...)
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