This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:
241 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 241
Material to categorize
  1. Phillip Abbott (1982). On Gutmann, "Moral Philosophy and Political Problems". Political Theory 10 (4):606-609.
  2. Joseph Agassi, Rights and Reason.
    is an unusual phenomenon. The concern with rights different citizens have in different societies is legal rather than philosophical. It is frequently somewhat a technical matter for jurisprudence to decide exactly what rights a citizen has in a given situation and how he might best exercise his rights. Often, to be sure, the legal technicalities involve matters of principle, and if so these should be made explicit. For this, too, there is a need less for philosophy and more for jurisprudence, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Heather Alexander & Jonathan Simon (2014). 'Unable to Return' in the 1951 Refugee Convention: Stateless Refugees and Climate Change. Florida Journal of International Law 26 (3):531-574.
    Argues that it is not only a point of literal construction, but also inherent in the object and purpose of the 1951 Refugee Convention, that displaced stateless persons unable to return to their countries of former habitual residence may be eligible for refugee status even if unpersecuted. 'Unable to return' as it occurs in the clause following the semi-colon of 1(A)2 of the 1951 Refugee Convention must be understood as a term of art subject to appropriate canons of construction in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Altman Andrew & Heath Wellman Christopher (2008). The Deontological Defense of Democracy: An Argument From Group Rights. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 89 (3):279-293.
    Abstract: Democracy is regularly heralded as the only form of government that treats political subjects as free and equal citizens. On closer examination, however, it becomes apparent that democracy unavoidably restricts individual freedom, and it is not the only way to treat all citizens equally. In light of these observations, we argue that the non-instrumental reasons to support democratic governance stem, not from considerations of individual freedom or equality, but instead from the importance of respecting group self-determination. If this is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Richard J. Arneson (2001). Against Rights. Philosophical Issues 11 (1):172-201.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Alcott Arthur (1985). ROBOTS, RIFs, and Rights. Journal of Business Ethics 4 (3):197 - 203.
    The increasing use of technological advances in business operations very often leads to the displacement of the employee whose skills become obsolete in light of such advances. There is no doubt that the interests of both company and employee are significantly affected by the implementation of laborsaving devices. Given that those interests are pursued in an environment which is usually, if not essentially, competitive, then there arises the serious question of what rights should be accorded the employee and the company (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Robert B. Ashmore (1987). Utility and Rights. Edited by R. G. Frey. Modern Schoolman 64 (2):122-124.
  8. Robert Audi (2005). Wrongs Within Rights. Philosophical Issues 15 (1):121–139.
  9. Christiane Bailey (2013). Book Symposium/Tribune du livreZoopolis, by Sue Donaldson and Will Kymlicka Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012 Zoopolis: A Political Renewal of Animal Rights Theories. Dialogue 52 (4):1-13.
  10. William Anthony Barbieri (1992). Citizenship and Group Rights: "Guestworkers" in the Federal Republic of Germany. Dissertation, Yale University
    This dissertation explores a foundational question of political theory and social ethics: Who is to be included in a political community, and on what terms? This question is approached through an examination of the case of foreign workers and their families in Germany who, although they have become permanent residents and enjoy a number of social and economic rights, remain effectively excluded from the German polity. The roots of this exclusion are traced through an examination of the interrelated processes that (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Martin W. Barr (1898). Defective Children: Their Needs and Their Rights. International Journal of Ethics 8 (4):481-490.
  12. Anna Flávia Arruda Lanna Barreto (2014). Violated Rights, Censured Memories: Histories of Violated Human Rights in Brazil and in the Southern Cone. Philosophy Study 4 (2).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Jon Barwise & Jerry Seligman (1994). The Rights and Wrongs of Natural Regularity. Philosophical Perspectives 8:331-364.
  14. Michael Baurmann & Hartmut Kliemt (1993). Volksabstimmungen, Verhandlungen Und der Schleier der Insignifikanz. Kommentar Zu Bruno S. Frey / Gebhard Kirchgässners "Diskursethik, Politische Ökonomie Und Volksabstimmungen". Analyse & Kritik 15 (2):150-167.
    To combine some views of 'Diskursethik' and Constitutional Political Economy seems to be promising. In our comments on Frey's and Kirchgässner's attempt to join the forces of Discourse theory and Political Economy in defending the wider spread use of referenda we direct attention to three points. Firstly, the normative basis of both concepts is unsettled. Secondly, an economic approach contrary to the supposition of Frey and Kirchgässner provides substantial insights into the processes which precede collective decisions. Thirdly, the 'veil of (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. David S. Berry (1998). Interpreting Rights and Culture: Extendinglaw's Empire. Res Publica 4 (1):3-28.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. William Berry (2003). Miranda Rights and Cyberspace Realities: Risks to "the Right to Remain Silent". Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (3):230-249.
    This article is a critical and interpretive examination of moral and ethical issues that have emerged as the Internet and other digital information forms have evolved. It considers individual expectations of privacy for one's cyberspace communications against the greater public good for unencumbered access, by government and other organizations, to information that may be harmful to others. I argue for the need to find a reasonable balance between the individual's "right" not to disclose information that might be self-incriminating, as codified (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Mario Biagioli (2006). Patent Republic: Representing Inventions, Constructing Rights and Authors. Social Research: An International Quarterly 73 (4):1129-1172.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18. Stephen Biggs (2012). Liberalism, Feminism, and Group Rights. The Monist 95 (1):72-85.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Omer Biran (2013). Strategic Collusion in Auctions with Externalities. Theory and Decision 75 (1):117-136.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Michael Blake (2010). Equality Without Documents: Political Justice and the Right to Amnesty. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (sup1):99-122.
  21. Kevin W. Bowyer (2010). The 2010 Schubmehl-Prein Essay Competition: What Should Individual Privacy Rights Be with Respect to Services Such as Street View? Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 40 (4):54-54.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. David Braybrooke (1980). Our Natural Bodies, Our Social Rights: Comments on Wheeler. Noûs 14 (2):195-202.
  23. Samantha Brennan (1999). Reconciling Feminist Politics and Feminist Ethics on the Issue of Rights. Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (2):260–275.
    Should feminist ethical theories include rights as a component? There is a tension between feminist politics and the endorsement of the language of “women’s rights,” and feminist ethics and its critique of rights.1 In this paper I begin the project of reconciling moral theories that include rights as a component with feminist criticisms of rights. There are two parts to this project. First, I must respond to the criticisms feminists have made against rights theories in order to show that it (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24. Samantha Brennan & Hillel Steiner (1996). An Essay on Rights. Philosophical Review 105 (4):557.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. C. Brettschneider (2011). Free and Equal Citizenship and Non-Profit Status: A Reply to Spinner-Halev. Political Theory 39 (6):785-792.
  26. Save the Children Fund Britain) (1993). Spotlight on Children's Rights and the Environment. Education Unit, Save the Children.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Edmund F. Byrne (1993). The Compensatory Rights of Emerging Interests. Social Philosophy Today 8:397-416.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. George C. Christie (2011). Philosopher Kings?: The Adjudication of Conflicting Human Rights and Social Values. Oxford University Press USA.
    Philosopher Kings? The Adjudication of Conflicting Human Rights and Social Values, by George C. Christie, examines the attempts by courts to sort out conflicts involving freedom of expression, including religious expression, on the one hand, and rights to privacy and other important social values on the other. It approaches the subject from a comparative perspective, using principally cases decided by European and United States courts. A significant part of this book analyzes conflicts between freedom of expression and the right to (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Kenneth Campbell (2001). Real Rights. Carl Wellman. Mind 110 (439):881-888.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Kenneth Campbell (1979). The Concept of Rights. Dissertation, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. ;The thesis is an examination of the concept of rights. Its aims are analytical and descriptive. No attempt is made to justify any particular possession or denial of rights. It is, however, a theory about rights in general, and not just about either legal or moral rights. This reflects the writer's belief that conceptual problems about the nature of rights can be satisfactorily tackled only if a unified approach (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. James W. Ceaser (2012). Progressivism and the Doctrine of Natural Rights. Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (2):177-195.
    Research Articles James W. Ceaser, Social Philosophy and Policy, FirstView Article.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Simone Chambers (1993). Talking About Rights: Discourse Ethics and the Protection of Rights. Journal of Political Philosophy 1 (3):229–249.
  33. Yu-Lin Chang (2007). Who Should Own Access Rights? A Game-Theoretical Approach to Striking the Optimal Balance in the Debate Over Digital Rights Management. Artificial Intelligence and Law 15 (4):323-356.
    The development of access rights as, perhaps, a replacement for copyright in digital rights management (DRM) systems, draws our attention to the importance of ‚the balance problem’ between information industries and the individual user. The nature of just what this ‚balance’ is, is often mentioned in copyright writings and judgments, but is rarely discussed. In this paper I focus upon elucidating the idea of balance in intellectual property and propose that the balance concept is not only the most feasible way (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. J. W. Child (1990). A. I. Melden, "Rights in Moral Lives". [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 40 (58):112.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Stephen R. L. Clark (1978). Animal Wrongs. Analysis 38 (3):147 - 149.
  36. Joshua Cohen (1997). The Arc of the Moral Universe. Philosophy and Public Affairs 26 (2):91-134.
  37. J. L. Cohenova (2001). Democracy, Differences and the Right of Privacy. Filosoficky Casopis 49 (2):273-307.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Roger Crisp (ed.) (2014). Griffin on Human Rights. Oxford University Press.
    This volume presents responses to the work of James Griffin, one of the most significant contributors to the contemporary debate over human rights. Leading moral and political philosophers engage with Griffin's views--according to which human rights are best understood as protections of our agency and personhood--and Griffin offers his own reply.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. G. Crowder (2009). Thunder Versus Enlightenment: A Response to Thunder. Political Theory 37 (1):161-166.
  40. John H. Crowley (1993). The Advertising Industry's Defense of its First Amendment Rights. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 8 (1):5 – 16.
    Advertising spokespersons have been defending their industry against tobacco and alcohol advertising bans by claiming the bans will do no good. In mature categories, they say advertising does not attract new users, but merely causes people to switch brands. This article contends that such an argument is based on legal pragmatism and will eventually fail because the public does not believe it. It suggests an ethical defense based on the public's right to know.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Eleanor Curran (2002). Hobbes's Theory of Rights – a Modern Interest Theory. Journal of Ethics 6 (1):63-86.
    The received view in Thomas Hobbes scholarship is that theindividual rights described by Hobbes in his political writings andspecifically in Leviathan are simple freedoms or libertyrights, that is, rights that are not correlated with duties orobligations on the part of others. In other words, it is usually arguedthat there are no claim rights for individuals in Hobbes''s politicaltheory. This paper argues, against that view, that Hobbes does describeclaim rights, that they come into being when individuals conform to thesecond law of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Peter P. Cvek (1991). A Re-Examination of John Locke’s Theory of Natural Law and Natural Rights. Social Philosophy Today 5:41-61.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Paulo Ferreira da Cunha (2001). O Ponto de Arquimedes Natureza Humana, Direito Natural, Direitos Humanos.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Norman Daniels (1984). Understanding Physician Power: A Review of the Social Transformation of American Medicine. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Public Affairs 13 (4):347-357.
  45. Derrick Darby, Book Review: An Introduction to Rights. [REVIEW]
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Derrick Darby (2003). Grounding Rights in Social Practices: A Defence. Res Publica 9 (1):1-18.
    This paper defends a social practiceconception of moral rights possession againstwhat many of its critics take to be a decisiveobjection, namely that such a conceptionprevents us from using moral rights forcritical purposes.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47. Stephen Darwall (2006). Contractualism, Root and Branch: A Review Essay. Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (2):193–214.
  48. Julia O'Connell Davidson (2002). The Rights and Wrongs of Prostitution. Hypatia 17 (2):84-98.
    : This essay critically explores contemporary Euro-American feminist debate on prostitution. It argues that to develop analyses relevant to the experience of more than just a small minority of "First World" women, those who are concerned with prostitution as a form of work need to look beyond liberal discourse on property and contractual consent for ways of conceptualizing the rights and wrongs of "sex work.".
    Remove from this list   Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  49. Mark A. Davidson (2011). No Conscience to Shock. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):131-149.
    Over the last thirty years, personal debt loads have increased dramatically. Lower income earners borrow money to purchase basic goods and services, so their debt is frequently non-discretionary. The impact of non-discretionary personal debt on debtors can be as, if not more, harmful than government regulations that have been declared unconstitutional. In this regard, the impact of personal debt is tantamount to the impact of a civil rights violation. What separates the impact of unconstitutional state action from that of personal (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Davis Andrew (2001). Do Children Have Privacy Rights in the Classroom? Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):245-254.
    Arguing that everyone has a right to privacy as control overaccess to `intimate' aspects of one's life, this author draws on thework of Julie Inness to discuss children's rights to privacy inclassrooms. Even if it is agreed that pupils should exercise this right,a central point is that there may be moral or other value considerationsthat justify setting the right aside. Among selected complexities, animportant extension is the right to psychological processes throughwhich learners acquire new knowledge.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 241