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  1. Animism, Aristotelianism, and the Legacy of William Gilbert’s De Magnete.Jeff Kochan - 2021 - Perspectives on Science 29 (2):157-188.
    William Gilbert’s 1600 book, De magnete, greatly influenced early modern natural philosophy. The book describes an impressive array of physical experiments, but it also advances a metaphysical view at odds with the soon to emerge mechanical philosophy. That view was animism. I distinguish two kinds of animism – Aristotelian and Platonic – and argue that Gilbert was an Aristotelian animist. Taking Robert Boyle as an example, I then show that early modern arguments against animism were often effective only against Platonic (...)
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  2. Locke on Scientific Methodology.Huaping Lu-Adler - 2021 - In Jessica Gordon-Roth & Shelley Weinberg (eds.), The Lockean Mind. pp. 277-89.
    This chapter brings some much-needed conceptual clarity to the debate about Locke’s scientific methodology. Instead of having to choose between the method of hypothesis and that of natural history (as most interpreters have thought), he would resist prescribing a single method for natural sciences in general. Following Francis Bacon and Robert Boyle, Locke separates medicine and natural philosophy (physics), so that they call for completely different methods. While a natural philosopher relies on “speculative” (causal-theoretical) hypotheses together with natural-history making to (...)
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  3. Experiment, Speculation, and Religion in Early Modern Philosophy Ed. By Alberto Vanzo and Peter R. Anstey.Marcus P. Adams - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (4):817-818.
    This edited volume will be of interest to specialists in the history of early modern philosophy and in the history and philosophy of science. It contains ten chapters related to the themes of experimental philosophy, speculative philosophy, and the relationships of both to religion. Most of the book considers these themes in the thought of six early modern philosophers, with a chapter for each of the following: Bacon, Boyle, Cavendish, Hobbes, Locke, and Newton. The remaining chapters focus upon these themes (...)
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  4. The Chemical Philosophy of Robert Boyle: Mechanicism, Chymical Atoms, and Emergence.Marina P. Banchetti - 2020 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    This book examines the way in which Robert Boyle seeks to accommodate his complex chemical philosophy within the framework of a mechanistic theory of matter. More specifically, the book proposes that Boyle regards chemical qualities as properties that emerged from the mechanistic structure of chymical atoms. Within Boyle’s chemical ontology, chymical atoms are structured concretions of particles that Boyle regards as chemically elementary entities, that is, as chemical wholes that resist experimental analysis. Although this interpretation of Boyle’s chemical philosophy has (...)
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  5. Boyle, Spinoza and Glauber: On the Philosophical Redintegration of Saltpeter—a Reply to Antonio Clericuzio.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2020 - Foundations of Chemistry 22 (1):59-76.
    The so-called ‘redintegration experiment’ is traditionally at the center of the comments on the supposed Boyle/Spinoza controversy. A. Clericuzio influentially argued in his publications that, in De nitro, Boyle accounted for the ‘redintegration’ of saltpeter on the grounds of the chemical properties of corpuscles and “did not make any attempt to deduce them from mechanical principles”. By way of contrast, this paper argues that with his De nitro Boyle wanted to illustrate and promote his new corpuscular or mechanical philosophy, and (...)
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  6. Cavendish and Boyle on Colour and Experimental Philosophy.Keith Allen - 2019 - In Alberto Vanzo & Peter R. Anstey (eds.), Experiment, Speculation and Religion in Early Modern Philosophy. New York: Routledge.
    Margaret Cavendish was a contemporary critic of the mechanistic theories of matter that came to dominate seventeenth-century thought and the proponent of a distinctive form of non-mechanistic materialism. Colour was a central issue both to the mechanistic theories of matter that Cavendish opposed and to the non-mechanistic alternative that she defended. This chapter considers the form of colour realism that Cavendish developed to complement her non-mechanistic materialism, and uses her criticisms of contemporary views of colour to try to better understand (...)
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  7. Robert Boyle and the Intelligibility of the Corpuscular Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey - 2019 - In Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo (eds.), Experiment, Speculation and Religion in Early Modern Philosophy. New York: Routledge.
    Early modern experimental philosophers were opposed to speculation, and yet many endorsed speculative theories. This chapter gives a partial explanation of why this is so, using Robert Boyle’s acceptance and promotion of the corpuscular philosophy as a case study. It argues that, in addition to furnishing experimental evidence for the corpuscular hypothesis in his Forms and Qualities, Boyle attempted to establish its epistemic superiority over other speculative theories on the grounds that it is founded upon superior principles. In his ‘Excellency (...)
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  8. Plant and Soil Chemistry in Seventeenth-Century England: Worsley, Boyle and Coxe.Antonio Clericuzio - 2018 - Early Science and Medicine 23 (5-6):550-583.
    In seventeenth-century England agriculturalists, projectors and natural philosophers devoted special attention to the chemical investigation of plants, of soil composition and of fertilizers. Hugh Plat’s and Francis Bacon’s works became particularly influential in the mid-seventeenth century, and inspired much of the Hartlib Circle’s schemes and research for improving agriculture. The Hartlibians turned to chemistry in order to provide techniques for improving soil and to investigate plant generation and growth. They drew upon the Paracelsian chemistry of salts, as well as upon (...)
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  9. Natural Philosophy, Deduction, and Geometry in the Hobbes-Boyle Debate.Marcus P. Adams - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):83-107.
    This paper examines Hobbes’s criticisms of Robert Boyle’s air-pump experiments in light of Hobbes’s account in _De Corpore_ and _De Homine_ of the relationship of natural philosophy to geometry. I argue that Hobbes’s criticisms rely upon his understanding of what counts as “true physics.” Instead of seeing Hobbes as defending natural philosophy as “a causal enterprise … [that] as such, secured total and irrevocable assent,” 1 I argue that, in his disagreement with Boyle, Hobbes relied upon his understanding of natural (...)
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  10. Early Modern Experimental Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo - 2016 - In Justin Sytsma & Wesley Buckwalter (eds.), A Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 87-102.
    In the mid-seventeenth century a movement of self-styled experimental philosophers emerged in Britain. Originating in the discipline of natural philosophy amongst Fellows of the fledgling Royal Society of London, it soon spread to medicine and by the eighteenth century had impacted moral and political philosophy and even aesthetics. Early modern experimental philosophers gave epistemic priority to observation and experiment over theorising and speculation. They decried the use of hypotheses and system-building without recourse to experiment and, in some quarters, developed a (...)
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  11. Robert Boyle and Seventeenth-Century Chemistry: A Second Look: Marie Boas: Robert Boyle and Seventeenth-Century Chemistry. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015, £18.99, US$ 28.99 PB.Antonio Clericuzio - 2016 - Metascience 25 (1):103-110.
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  12. Mechanical Reconfigurable Microstrip Antenna.Alsharif Fawzy, Safi Safi, AbouFoul Tamer, Abu Nasr Mustafa & Abu Naser Samy - 2016 - International Journal of Microwave and Optical Technology 11 (3):153--160.
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  13. Michael Hunter. Boyle Studies: Aspects of the Life and Thought of Robert Boyle . Xiv + 244 Pp., Illus., Apps., Index. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2015. £70. [REVIEW]Salvatore Ricciardo - 2016 - Isis 107 (1):180-181.
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  14. Experiment and Speculation in Seventeenth-Century Italy: The Case of Geminiano Montanari.Alberto Vanzo - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:52-61.
    This paper reconstructs the natural philosophical method of Geminiano Montanari, one of the most prominent Italian natural philosophers of the late seventeenth century. Montanari’s views are used as a case study to assess recent claims concerning early modern experimental philosophy. Having presented the distinctive tenets of seventeenth-century experimental philosophers, I argue that Montanari adheres to them explicitly, thoroughly, and consistently. The study of Montanari’s views supports three claims. First, experimental philosophy was not an exclusively British phenomenon. Second, in spite of (...)
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  15. Experimental Pedagogy and the Eclipse of Robert Boyle in England.Peter R. Anstey - 2015 - Intellectual History Review 25 (1):115-131.
  16. The Distinction Between Primary Properties and Secondary Qualities in Galileo's Natural Philosophy.F. Buyse - 2015 - Cahiers du Séminaire Québécois En Philosophie Moderne / Working Papers of the Quebec Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy 1:20-45.
    In Il Saggiatore (1623), Galileo makes a strict distinction between primary and secondary qualities. Although this distinction continues to be debated in philosophical literature up to this very day, Galileo's views on the matter, as well as their impact on his contemporaries and other philosophers, have yet to be sufficiently documented. The present paper helps to clear up Galileo's ideas on the subject by avoiding some of the misunderstandings that have arisen due to faulty translations of his work. In particular, (...)
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  17. Robert Boyle’s Mechanical Account of Hydrostatics and Pneumatics: Fluidity, the Spring of the Air and Their Relationship to the Concept of Pressure.Alan Chalmers - 2015 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 69 (5):429-454.
    This article in an attempt to identify the precise way in which Robert Boyle provided a mechanical account of the features that distinguish liquids and air from solids and from each other. In his pneumatics, Boyle articulated his notion of the ‘spring’ of the air for that purpose. Pressure appeared there only in a common, rather than in a technical, sense. It was when he turned to hydrostatics that Boyle found the need to introduce a technical sense of pressure to (...)
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  18. Eksperymentalny Styl Roberta Boyle’a a Nowy Eksperymentalizm Iana Hackinga. Porównawcze Studium Filozoficzno-Metodologiczne.Radosław Kazibut - 2015 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 10 (3).
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  19. From Aristotle’s Teleology to Darwin’s Genealogy: The Stamp of Inutility, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 (Pdf: Contents, Introduction).Marco Solinas - 2015 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Starting with Aristotle and moving on to Darwin, Marco Solinas outlines the basic steps from the birth, establishment and later rebirth of the traditional view of living beings, and its overturning by evolutionary revolution. The classic framework devised by Aristotle was still dominant in the 17th Century world of Galileo, Harvey and Ray, and remained hegemonic until the time of Lamarck and Cuvier in the 19th Century. Darwin's breakthrough thus takes on the dimensions of an abandonment of the traditional finalistic (...)
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  20. Philosophy of Experiment in Early Modern England: The Case of Bacon, Boyle and Hooke.Peter R. Anstey - 2014 - Early Science and Medicine 19 (2):103-132.
  21. Robert Boyle.Peter R. Anstey & J. J. Macintosh - 2014 - In Edward Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2010 Edition). Stanford University: Metaphysics Research Lab, CSLI. pp. 1-39.
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  22. Introduction to Newton and Empiricism.Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser - 2014 - In Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Newton and Empiricism. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 1-15.
    The introduction considers the state of scholarship on empiricism as a philosophical and historical category, particularly as it pertains to experimental philosophy. It concludes that empiricism properly understood is a rich category encompassing epistemic, semantic, methodological, experimental, and moral elements. Its richness makes it a suitable lens through which to account for actual historical complexity. The introduction relates the category to the work of Sir Isaac Newton, who influenced all of empiricism’s elements.
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  23. The Experimentalist as Humanist: Robert Boyle on the History of Philosophy.Dmitri Levitin - 2014 - Annals of Science 71 (2):149-182.
    SummaryHistorians of science have neglected early modern natural philosophers' varied attitudes to the history of philosophy, often preferring to use loose labels such as ‘Epicureanism’ to describe the survival of ancient doctrines. This is methodologically inappropriate: reifying such philosophical movements tells us little about the complex ways in which early modern natural philosophers approached the history of their own discipline. As this article shows, a central figure of early modern natural philosophy, Robert Boyle, invested great intellectual energy into his depiction (...)
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  24. The Theory of Material Qualities.Peter R. Anstey - 2013 - In The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 240.
    This chapter examines the main theories of material qualities developed by leading British philosophers during the seventeenth century, describes the taxonomy of qualities during this period, and analyzes the epistemological and metaphysical theses that influenced the development of the theory of material qualities in Great Britain. It also considers the relevant works of Thomas Hobbes, Walter Charleton, Robert Boyle, John Locke, and Isaac Newton.
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  25. The Relevance of Boyle's Chemical Philosophy for Contemporary Philosophy of Chemistry.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 2013 - In Jean-Pierre Llored (ed.), The Philosophy of Chemistry: Practices, Methodologies, and Concepts.
  26. Spinoza, Boyle, Galileo: Was Spinoza a Strict Mechanical Philosopher?Filip Buyse - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (1):45-64.
  27. Spinoza, Boyle, Galileo : Was Spinoza a Strict Mechanical Philosopher?Filip Buyse - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (1):45-64.
  28. Sorana Corneanu. Regimens of the Mind: Boyle, Locke and the Early Modern Cultura Animi Tradition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011. Pp. Ix+229. $50.00. [REVIEW]Jan-Erik Jones - 2013 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (2):371-374.
  29. Regimens of the Mind: Boyle, Locke, and the Early Modern Cultura Animi Tradition (Review).J. J. MacIntosh - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (1):127-128.
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  30. The Ontological Function of First-Order and Second-Order Corpuscles in the Chemical Philosophy of Robert Boyle: The Redintegration of Potassium Nitrate.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 2012 - Foundations of Chemistry 14 (3):221-234.
    Although Boyle has been regarded as a champion of the seventeenth century Cartesian mechanical philosophy, I defend the position that Boyle’s views conciliate between a strictly mechanistic conception of fundamental matter and a non-reductionist conception of chemical qualities. In particular, I argue that this conciliation is evident in Boyle’s ontological distinction between fundamental corpuscles endowed with mechanistic properties and higher-level corpuscular concretions endowed with chemical properties. Some of these points have already been acknowledged by contemporary scholars, and I actively engage (...)
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  31. Boyle’s Teleological Mechanism and the Myth of Immanent Teleology.Laurence Carlin - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (1):54-63.
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  32. Intermediate Causes and Explanations: The Key to Understanding the Scientific Revolution.Alan Chalmers - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (4):551-562.
    It is instructive to view the scientific revolution from the point of view of Robert Boyle’s distinction between intermediate and ultimate causes. From this point of view, the scientific revolution involved the identification of intermediate causes and their investigation by way of experiment as opposed to the specification of ultimate causes of the kind involved in the corpuscular matter theories of the mechanical philosophers. The merits of this point of view are explored in this paper by focussing on the hydrostatics (...)
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  33. Regimens of the Mind: Boyle, Locke, and the Early Modern Cultura Animi Tradition.Sorana Corneanu - 2012 - University of Chicago Press.
    In _Regimens of the Mind_, Sorana Corneanu proposes a new approach to the epistemological and methodological doctrines of the leading experimental philosophers of seventeenth-century England, an approach that considers their often overlooked moral, psychological, and theological elements. Corneanu focuses on the views about the pursuit of knowledge in the writings of Robert Boyle and John Locke, as well as in those of several of their influences, including Francis Bacon and the early Royal Society virtuosi. She argues that their experimental programs (...)
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  34. The Experimentalist as Humanist: Robert Boyle on the History of Philosophy.Dmitri Levitin - 2012 - Annals of Science (2):1-34.
    Summary Historians of science have neglected early modern natural philosophers' varied attitudes to the history of philosophy, often preferring to use loose labels such as ?Epicureanism? to describe the survival of ancient doctrines. This is methodologically inappropriate: reifying such philosophical movements tells us little about the complex ways in which early modern natural philosophers approached the history of their own discipline. As this article shows, a central figure of early modern natural philosophy, Robert Boyle, invested great intellectual energy into his (...)
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  35. Regimens of the Mind. Boyle, Locke and the Early Modern Cultura Animi Tradition.Vivian Nutton - 2012 - Annals of Science (4):1-2.
  36. Hobbes's Challenge to Descartes, Bramhall and Boyle: A Corporeal God.Patricia Springborg - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (5):903-934.
    This paper brings new work to bear on the perennial question about Hobbes's atheism to show that as a debate about scepticism it is falsely framed. Hobbes, like fellow members of the Mersenne circle, Descartes and Gassendi, was no sceptic, but rather concerned to rescue physics and metaphysics from radical scepticism by exploring corporealism. In his early letter of November 1640, Hobbes had issued a provocative challenge to Descartes to abandon metaphysical dualism and subscribe to a ?corporeal God?; a provocation (...)
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  37. Kant on Experiment.Alberto Vanzo - 2012 - In James Maclaurin (ed.), Rationis Defensor. Springer. pp. 75-96.
    This paper discusses Immanuel Kant’s views on the role of experiments in natural science, focusing on their relationship with hypotheses, laws of nature, and the heuristic principles of scientific enquiry. Kant’s views are contrasted with the philosophy of experiment that was first sketched by Francis Bacon and later developed by Robert Boyle and Robert Hooke. Kant holds that experiments are always designed and carried out in the light of hypotheses. Hypotheses are derived from experience on the basis of a set (...)
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  38. The Importance of Teleology to Boyle's Natural Philosophy.Laurence Carlin - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (4):665 - 682.
    Boyle prefaced his Disquisition about the Final Causes of Natural Things with the claim that there are three dangerous consequences for failing to engage in the pursuit of final causes. Boyle was sincere in this claim, for there is a systematic line of reasoning in his texts that incorporates all three consequences and establishes conceptual connections between his science, his theology, and his value theory. I argue in this paper that Boyle's teleological outlook led him to believe that the natural (...)
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  39. Chemical Translation: The Case of Robert Boyle's Experiments on Sensible Qualities.Kleber Cecon - 2011 - Annals of Science 68 (2):179-198.
    Summary The purpose of this work is to translate some of Robert Boyle's chemical experiments into the terms of modern chemistry. Most of the reactions involve sensible qualities, since there are on it considerable helpful tracking descriptions like heating, hissing, colour changing, etc. For a long time in the history of science, this procedure was seen as an exercise in anachronism which should be avoided at all costs. Recently many scholars have demonstrated that chemical translation can assist with historical work (...)
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  40. Understanding Science Through its History: A Response to Newman.Alan Chalmers - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):150-153.
    The paper is a response to William Newman’s rebuttal of a critique of his account of the origins of modern chemistry by Alan Chalmers. A way in which the nature of science can be illuminated by history of science is identified and an account of how this can be achieved in the context of a study of the work of Boyle defended in the face of Newman’s criticism. Texts from the writings of Boyle that are cited by Newman as posing (...)
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  41. Bodies in Descartes and Boyle.Lisa Downing - 2011 - In Lawrence Nolan (ed.), Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 109.
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  42. Sensible Qualities and Material Bodies in Descartes and Boyle.Lisa Downing - 2011 - In Lawrence Nolan (ed.), Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate. Oxford University Press.
    Descartes and Boyle were the most influential proponents of strict mechanist accounts of the physical world, accounts which carried with them a distinction between primary and secondary (or sensible) qualities. For both, the distinction is a piece of natural philosophy. Nevertheless the distinction is quite differently articulated, and, especially, differently grounded in the two thinkers. For Descartes, reasoned reflection reveals to us that bodies must consist in mere extension and its modifications, and that sensible qualities as we conceive of them (...)
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  43. Imaginitive Inventions: A Purposive Account of Literature in Response to Nicholas Boyle.Caery Evangelist - 2011 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 14 (4):55-73.
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  44. Remembering Robert Seydel.Lauren Haaftern-Schick & Sura Levine - 2011 - Continent 1 (2):141-144.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 141-144. This January, while preparing a new course, Robert Seydel was struck and killed by an unexpected heart attack. He was a critically under-appreciated artist and one of the most beloved and admired professors at Hampshire College. At the time of his passing, Seydel was on the brink of a major artistic and career milestone. His Book of Ruth was being prepared for publication by Siglio Press. His publisher describes the book as: “an alchemical assemblage that composes (...)
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  45. Robert A. Davis.Mythologies Of Innocence - 2011 - In Nancy Vansieleghem & David Kennedy (eds.), Philosophy for Children in Transition: Problems and Prospects. Wiley. pp. 210.
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  46. Mechanical Chopin.Common Knowledge - 2011 - Common Knowledge 17 (2).
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  47. The Wisdom in Wood Rot: God in Eighteenth Century Scientific Explanation.Eric Palmer - 2011 - In William Krieger (ed.), Science at the Frontiers: Perspectives on the History and Philosophy of Science. Lexington Books. pp. 17-35.
    This chapter presents a historical study of how science has developed and of how philosophical theories of many sorts – philosophy of science, theory of the understanding, and philosophical theology – both enable and constrain certain lines of development in scientific practice. Its topic is change in the legitimacy or acceptability of scientific explanation that invokes purposes, or ends; specifically in the argument from design, in the natural science field of physico-theology, around the start of the eighteenth century. ... The (...)
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  48. La Philosophie Naturelle de Robert Boyle. [REVIEW]Victor Boantza - 2010 - Isis 101:875-875.
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  49. And on the Role of ANALOGY. Boyle is Perhaps the Thinker Who Had the Greatest Positive Influ.Robert Boyle - 2010 - In S. J. Savonius-Wroth Paul Schuurman & Jonathen Walmsley (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Locke. Continuum. pp. 47.
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  50. Spinoza and Robert Boyle's Definition of Mechanical Philosophy.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2010 - Historia Philosophica 8:73-89.
1 — 50 / 310