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  1. Interaction Between Human and Robot: An Affect-Inspired Approach.Pramila Agrawal, Changchun Liu & Nilanjan Sarkar - 2008 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 9 (2):230-257.
  2. Assessing Artificial Consciousness.Igor Aleksander, Susan Stuart & Tom Ziemke - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (7):95-110.
    While the recent special issue of JCS on machine consciousness (Volume 14, Issue 7) was in preparation, a collection of papers on the same topic, entitled Artificial Consciousness and edited by Antonio Chella and Riccardo Manzotti, was published. 1 The editors of the JCS special issue, Ron Chrisley, Robert Clowes and Steve Torrance, thought it would be a timely and productive move to have authors of papers in their collection review the papers in the Chella and Manzotti book, and include (...)
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  3. Towards Robot Cultures?: Learning to Imitate in a Robotic Arm Test-Bed with Dissimilarly Embodied Agents.Aris Alissandrakis, Chrystopher L. Nehaniv & Kerstin Dautenhahn - 2004 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 5 (1):3-44.
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  4. Unhomely at Home: Dwelling with Domestic Robots.Nicholas S. Anderson - 2009 - Mediatropes 2 (1):37-59.
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  5. Asimov's “Three Laws of Robotics” and Machine Metaethics.Susan Leigh Anderson - 2008 - AI and Society 22 (4):477-493.
    Using Asimov’s “Bicentennial Man” as a springboard, a number of metaethical issues concerning the emerging field of machine ethics are discussed. Although the ultimate goal of machine ethics is to create autonomous ethical machines, this presents a number of challenges. A good way to begin the task of making ethics computable is to create a program that enables a machine to act an ethical advisor to human beings. This project, unlike creating an autonomous ethical machine, will not require that we (...)
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  6. Small Planetary Rovers.Colin M. Angle & Rodney A. Brooks - unknown
    We have previously built a small IKg ([Angle 89] and [Brooks 89]) six legged walking robot named Genghis. It was remarkably successful as a testbed to develop walking and learning algorithms. It encouraged us to build a more fully engineered robot with higher performance. We are building two copies of the robot, both 1.6Kg in mass. Their generic name is Attila. Attila has 24 actuators and over 150 sensors, all connected via a local network (the I2C bus) to 11 onboard (...)
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  7. Cognitive Behavioural Systems.Esposito Anna, Esposito Antonietta M., Hoffmann Rüdiger, Müller Vincent C. & Vinciarelli Alessandro (eds.) - 2012 - Springer.
    This book constitutes refereed proceedings of the COST 2102 International Training School on Cognitive Behavioural Systems held in Dresden, Germany, in February 2011. The 39 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from various submissions. The volume presents new and original research results in the field of human-machine interaction inspired by cognitive behavioural human-human interaction features. The themes covered are on cognitive and computational social information processing, emotional and social believable Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) systems, behavioural and contextual analysis (...)
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  8. Emotions: From Brain to Robot.Michael A. Arbib & Jean-Marc Fellous - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (12):554-561.
  9. “We Can Rebuild Him!”: The Essentialisation of the Human/Cyborg Interface in the Twenty-First Century, or Whatever Happened to The Six Million Dollar Man? [REVIEW]Simon Bacon - 2013 - AI and Society 28 (3):267-276.
    This paper aims to show how recent cinematic representations reveal a far more pessimistic and essentialised vision of Human/Cyborg hybridity in comparison with the more enunciative and optimistic ones seen at the end of the twentieth century. Donna Haraway’s still influential 1985 essay “A Cyborg Manifesto” saw the combination of the organic and the technological as offering new and exciting ways beyond the normalised culturally constructed categories of gender and identity formation. However, more recently critics see her later writings as (...)
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  10. Robots.Grant Bartley - 2008 - Philosophy Now 69:38-41.
  11. The Carrot and the Stick: The Role of Praise and Punishment in Human–Robot Interaction.Christoph Bartneck, Juliane Reichenbach & Julie Carpenter - 2008 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 9 (2):179-203.
  12. The Influence of People's Culture and Prior Experiences with Aibo on Their Attitude Towards Robots.Christoph Bartneck, Tomohiro Suzuki, Takayuki Kanda & Tatsuya Nomura - 2006 - AI and Society 21 (1-2):217-230.
    This paper presents a cross-cultural study on peoples’ negative attitude toward robots. 467 participants from seven different countries filled in the negative attitude towards robots scale survey which consists of 14 questions in three clusters: attitude towards the interaction with robots, attitude towards social influence of robots and attitude towards emotions in interaction with robots. Around one half of them were recruited at local universities and the other half was approached through Aibo online communities. The participants’ cultural background had a (...)
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  13. LEGO® Mindstorms, Robotics Invention System 1.5.Michael Baumann - 2000 - Complexity 5 (6):48-50.
  14. Between Angels and Animals: The Question of Robot Ethics, or is Kantian Moral Agency Desirable?Anthony F. Beavers - unknown
    In this paper, I examine a variety of agents that appear in Kantian ethics in order to determine which would be necessary to make a robot a genuine moral agent. However, building such an agent would require that we structure into a robot’s behavioral repertoire the possibility for immoral behavior, for only then can the moral law, according to Kant, manifest itself as an ought, a prerequisite for being able to hold an agent morally accountable for its actions. Since building (...)
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  15. Studying Laughter in Combination with Two Humanoid Robots.Christian Becker-Asano, Takayuki Kanda, Carlos Ishi & Hiroshi Ishiguro - 2011 - AI and Society 26 (3):291-300.
    To let humanoid robots behave socially adequate in a future society, we started to explore laughter as an important para-verbal signal known to influence relationships among humans rather easily. We investigated how the naturalness of various types of laughter in combination with different humanoid robots was judged, first, within a situational context that is suitable for laughter and, second, without describing the situational context. Given the variety of human laughter, do people prefer a certain style for a robot’s laughter? And (...)
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  16. Time Will Tell Why It is Too Early to Worry. [REVIEW]Tony Belpaeme & Anthony Morse - 2010 - Interaction Studies 11 (2):191-195.
    The author reflects on the premature speculations of many commentators on robot caregivers. He argues on the commentator's ethical issues that it creates false beliefs in children, in which he says that the creation of false beliefs by their caretakers is part and parcel of childhood. He argues that societies are already delegated the childcare onto others such as school and since technology is often substituting for direct physical social contact, its time to embrace the robotic care.
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  17. The Japanese Roboticist Masahiro Mori’s Buddhist Inspired Concept of “The Uncanny Valley".W. A. Borody - 2013 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 23 (1):31-44.
    In 1970, the Japanese roboticist and practicing Buddhist Masahiro Mori wrote a short essay entitled “On the Uncanny Valley” for the journal Energy . Since the publication of this two-page essay, Mori’s concept of the Uncanny Valley has become part and parcel of the discourse within the fields of humanoid robotics engineering, the film industry, culture studies, and philosophy, most notably the philosophy of transhumanism. In this paper, the concept of the Uncanny Valley is discussed in terms of the contemporary (...)
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  18. Hegelian Phenomenology and Robotics.Donald S. Borrett, David Shih, Michael Tomko, Sarah Borrett & Hon C. Kwan - 2011 - International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (01):219-235.
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  19. Robot Emotions: A Functional Perspective.C. Breazeal & Rodney Brooks - 2004 - In J. Fellous (ed.), Who Needs Emotions. Oxford University Press.
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  20. Robots That Imitate Humans.Cynthia Breazeal & Brian Scassellati - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):481-487.
  21. Dynamics of Perceptible Agency: The Case of Social Robots.Maria Brincker - 2016 - Minds and Machines 26 (4):441-466.
    How do we perceive the agency of others? Do the same rules apply when interacting with others who are radically different from ourselves, like other species or robots? We typically perceive other people and animals through their embodied behavior, as they dynamically engage various aspects of their affordance field. In second personal perception we also perceive social or interactional affordances of others. I discuss various aspects of perceptible agency, which might begin to give us some tools to understand interactions also (...)
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  22. Ethical Robots: The Future Can Heed Us. [REVIEW]Selmer Bringsjord - 2007 - AI and Society 22 (4):539-550.
    Bill Joy’s deep pessimism is now famous. Why the Future Doesn’t Need Us, his defense of that pessimism, has been read by, it seems, everyone—and many of these readers, apparently, have been converted to the dark side, or rather more accurately, to the future-is-dark side. Fortunately (for us; unfortunately for Joy), the defense, at least the part of it that pertains to AI and robotics, fails. Ours may be a dark future, but we cannot know that on the basis of (...)
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  23. On Building Robot Persons: Response to Zlatev. [REVIEW]Selmer Bringsjord - 2004 - Minds and Machines 14 (3):381-385.
    Zlatev offers surprisingly weak reasoning in support of his view that robots with the right kind of developmental histories can have meaning. We ought nonetheless to praise Zlatev for an impressionistic account of how attending to the psychology of human development can help us build robots that appear to have intentionality.
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  24. Challenges for Complete Creature Architectures.Rodney Brooks - 1991 - In Jean-Arcady Meyer & Stewart W. Wilson (eds.), From Animals to Animats: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior (Complex Adaptive Systems). MIT Press.
    boundaries. It is impossible to do good science without having an appreciation for the problems and concepts in the other levels of abstraction (at least in the direction from biology towards physics), but there are whole sets of tools, methods of analysis, theories and explanations within each discipline which do not cross those boundaries.
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  25. From Earwigs to Humans.Rodney A. Brooks - unknown
    Both direct, and evolved, behavior-based approaches to mobile robots have yielded a number of interesting demonstrations of robots that navigate, map, plan and operate in the real world. The work can best be described as attempts to emulate insect level locomotion and navigation, with very little work on behavior-based non-trivial manipulation of the world. There have been some behavior-based attempts at exploring social interactions, but these too have been modeled after the sorts of social interactions we see in insects. But (...)
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  26. Technologies for Human/Humanoid Natural Interactions.Rodney A. Brooks - unknown
    There are a number of reasons to be interested in building humanoid robots. They include (1) since almost all human artifacts have been designed to easy for humans to interact with, humanoid robots provide backward compatibility with the existing human constructed world, (2) humanoid robots provide a natural form for humans to operate through telepresence since they have the same kinematic design as humans themselves, (3) by building humanoid robots that model humans directly they will be a useful tool in (...)
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  27. Learning to Coordinate Behaviors.Rodney A. Brooks - unknown
    We describe an algorithm which allows a behavior-based robot to learn on the basis of positive and negative feedback when to activate its behaviors. In accordance with the philosophy of behavior-based robots, the algorithm is completely distributed: each of the behaviors independently tries to find out (i) whether it is relevant (ie. whether it is at all correlated to positive feedback) and (ii) what the conditions are under which it becomes reliable (i.e. the conditions under which i t maximizes the (...)
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  28. Prospects for Human Level Intelligence for Humanoid Robots.Rodney A. Brooks - unknown
    Both direct, and evolved, behavior-based approaches to mobile robots have yielded a number of interesting demonstrations of robots that navigate, map, plan and operate in the real world. The work can best be described as attempts to emulate insect level locomotion and navigation, with very little work on behavior-based non-trivial manipulation of the world. There have been some behavior-based attempts at exploring social interactions, but these too have been modeled after the sorts of social interactions we see in insects. But (...)
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  29. The Role of Learning in Autonomous Robots.Rodney A. Brooks - unknown
    Applications of learning to autonomous agents (simulated or real) have often been restricted to learning a mapping from perceived state of the world to the next action to take. Often this is couched in terms of learning from no previous knowledge. This general case for real autonomous robots is very difficult. In any case, when building a real robot there is usually a lot of a priori knowledge (e.g., from the engineering that went into its design) which doesn’t need to (...)
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  30. A Robot That Walks; Emergent Behaviors From a Carefully Evolved Network.Rodney A. Brooks - unknown
    Most animals have significant behavioral expertise built in without having to explicitly learn it all from scratch. This expertise is a product of evolution of the organism; it can be viewed as a very long term form of learning which provides a structured system within which individuals might learn more specialized skills or abilities. This paper suggests one possible mechanism for analagous robot evolution by describing a carefully designed series of networks, each one being a strict augmentation of the previous (...)
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  31. The Cog Project: Building a Humanoid Robot.Rodney A. Brooks, Cynthia Breazeal, Matthew Marjanovic, Brian Scassellati & Matthew Williamson - 1999 - Lecture Notes in Computer Science 1562:52-87.
    To explore issues of developmental structure, physical em- bodiment, integration of multiple sensory and motor systems, and social interaction, we have constructed an upper-torso humanoid robot called Cog. The robot has twenty-one degrees of freedom and a variety of sen- sory systems, including visual, auditory, vestibular, kinesthetic, and tac- tile senses. This chapter gives a background on the methodology that we have used in our investigations, highlights the research issues that have been raised during this project, and provides a summary (...)
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  32. Building Brains for Bodies.Rodney A. Brooks & Lynn Andrea Stein - 1994 - Autonomous Robotics 1 (1):7-25.
    We describe a project to capitalize on newly available levels of computational resources in order to understand human cognition. We are building an integrated physical system including vision, sound input and output, and dextrous manipulation, all controlled by a continuously operating large scale parallel MIMD computer. The resulting system will learn to "think" by building on its bodily experiences to accomplish progressively more abstract tasks. Past experience suggests that in attempting to build such an integrated system we will have to (...)
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  33. Why Robot Nannies Probably Won't Do Much Psychological Damage.Joanna J. Bryson - 2010 - Interaction Studies 11 (2):196-200.
  34. The Attentional Spotlight.Joanna J. Bryson - 2006 - Minds and Machines 16 (1):21-28.
    One of the interesting and occasionally controversial aspects of Dennett’s career is his direct involvement in the scientific process. This article describes some of Dennett’s participation on one particular project conducted at MIT, the building of the humanoid robot named Cog. One of the intentions of this project, not to date fully realized, was to test Dennett’s multiple drafts theory of consciousness. I describe Dennett’s involvement and impact on Cog from the perspective of a graduate student. I also describe the (...)
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  35. The Attentional Spotlight (Dennett and the Cog Project).Joanna J. Bryson - 2006 - Minds and Machines 16 (1):21-28.
    One of the interesting and occasionally controversial aspects of Dennett’s career is his direct involvement in the scientific process. This article describes some of Dennett’s participation on one particular project conducted at MIT, the building of the humanoid robot named Cog. One of the intentions of this project, not to date fully realized, was to test Dennett’s multiple drafts theory of consciousness. I describe Dennett’s involvement and impact on Cog from the perspective of a graduate student. I also describe the (...)
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  36. What is the Teacher's Role in Robot Programming by Demonstration? Toward Benchmarks for Improved Learning.Sylvain Calinon & Aude G. Billard - 2007 - Interaction Studies 8 (3):441-464.
  37. Artificial Consciousness, Artificial Emotions, and Autonomous Robots.Alain Cardon - 2006 - Cognitive Processing 7 (4):245-267.
  38. Ethics in Robotics.Daniela Cerqui, Jutta Weber & Karsten Weber - 2006 - International Review of Information Ethics 2:2006.
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  39. Towards Robot Conscious Perception.Antonio Chella - 2007 - In Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (eds.), Artificial Consciousness. Imprint Academic. pp. 124-140.
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  40. Artificial Consciousness.Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti - 2007 - Imprint Academic.
    And why is there a subjective component to experience?). It is easy to see that the separation between Weak and Strong Artificial Consciousness mirrors the separation between the easy problems and the hard problems of consciousness.
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  41. How Situated Cognition is Different From Situated Robotics.William Clancey - 1995 - In Luc Steels & Rodney Brooks (eds.), The "Artificial Life" Route to "Artificial Intelligence": Building Situated Embodied Agents. Hillsdale, Nj: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. pp. 227-236.
  42. Towards a Cognitive Robotics.Andy Clark & Rick Grush - 1999 - Adaptive Behavior 7 (1):5-16.
    There is a definite challenge in the air regarding the pivotal notion of internal representation. This challenge is explicit in, e.g., van Gelder, 1995; Beer, 1995; Thelen & Smith, 1994; Wheeler, 1994; and elsewhere. We think it is a challenge that can be met and that (importantly) can be met by arguing from within a general framework that accepts many of the basic premises of the work (in new robotics and in dynamical systems theory) that motivates such scepticism in the (...)
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  43. You, Robot: On the Linguistic Construction of Artificial Others. [REVIEW]Mark Coeckelbergh - 2011 - AI and Society 26 (1):61-69.
    How can we make sense of the idea of ‘personal’ or ‘social’ relations with robots? Starting from a social and phenomenological approach to human–robot relations, this paper explores how we can better understand and evaluate these relations by attending to the ways our conscious experience of the robot and the human–robot relation is mediated by language. It is argued that our talk about and to robots is not a mere representation of an objective robotic or social-interactive reality, but rather interprets (...)
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  44. Anthony Chemero: Radical Embodied Cognitive Science. [REVIEW]David Cole - 2010 - Minds and Machines 20 (3):475-479.
  45. Homo Sapiens, Robots, and Persons in/, Robot and Bicentennial Man.Stephen Coleman & Richard Hanley - 2009 - In Sandra Shapshay (ed.), Bioethics at the Movies. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 44.
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  46. Robots and If ... Then.Ronald Cordero - 2002 - Sorites 14:21-35.
    How shall we have robots handle conditional statements? In this paper I argue that we absolutely cannot let them use several of the presently accepted rules of inference involving conditional statements if we want to avoid odd, preposterous, or even disastrous results. I discuss several kinds of problems that could be encountered and suggest alterations to certain rules of inference to prevent such problems from arising.
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  47. Cybernetics.Roberto Cordeschi - 2008 - In L. Floridi (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information. Blackwell.
    The term cybernetics was first used in 1947 by Norbert Wiener with reference to the centrifugal governor that James Watt had fitted to his steam engine, and above all to Clerk Maxwell, who had subjected governors to a general mathematical treatment in 1868. Wiener used the word “governor” in the sense of the Latin corruption of the Greek term kubernetes, or “steersman.” Wiener defined cybernetics as the study of “control and communication in the animal and the machine” (Wiener 1948). This (...)
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  48. The Discovery of the Artificial: Behavior, Mind and Machines Before and Beyond Cybernetics.Roberto Cordeschi - 2002 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Since the second half of the XXth century, researchers in cybernetics and AI, neural nets and connectionism, Artificial Life and new robotics have endeavoured to build different machines that could simulate functions of living organisms, such as adaptation and development, problem solving and learning. In this book these research programs are discussed, particularly as regard the epistemological issues of the behaviour modelling. One of the main novelty of this book consists of the fact that certain projects involving the building of (...)
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  49. Telepresence - Reach Out and Grab Someone.John Cramer - unknown
    Superficially, the robots of early SF appears to be a prediction that is on target. In factories all over the world "robots" are replacing human workers at production lines that assemble everything from Toyotas to Macintoshes. Surely it's only a matter of time before these robots walk out of the factories and into shops and business offices, replacing human workers everywhere with more efficient mechanical substitutes. Indeed, many SF writers have based stories on just such premises.
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  50. Moral Machines: Teaching Robots Right From Wrong.Lisa Damm - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):149 - 153.
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