This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:See also:
136 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 136
  1. Igor Aleksander, Susan Stuart & Tom Ziemke (2008). Assessing Artificial Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (7):95-110.
    While the recent special issue of JCS on machine consciousness (Volume 14, Issue 7) was in preparation, a collection of papers on the same topic, entitled Artificial Consciousness and edited by Antonio Chella and Riccardo Manzotti, was published. 1 The editors of the JCS special issue, Ron Chrisley, Robert Clowes and Steve Torrance, thought it would be a timely and productive move to have authors of papers in their collection review the papers in the Chella and Manzotti book, and include (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Aris Alissandrakis, Chrystopher L. Nehaniv & Kerstin Dautenhahn (2004). Towards Robot Cultures?: Learning to Imitate in a Robotic Arm Test-Bed with Dissimilarly Embodied Agents. Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 5 (1):3-44.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Susan Leigh Anderson (2008). Asimov's “Three Laws of Robotics” and Machine Metaethics. AI and Society 22 (4):477-493.
    Using Asimov’s “Bicentennial Man” as a springboard, a number of metaethical issues concerning the emerging field of machine ethics are discussed. Although the ultimate goal of machine ethics is to create autonomous ethical machines, this presents a number of challenges. A good way to begin the task of making ethics computable is to create a program that enables a machine to act an ethical advisor to human beings. This project, unlike creating an autonomous ethical machine, will not require that we (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  4. Esposito Anna, Esposito Antonietta M., Hoffmann Rüdiger, Müller Vincent C. & Vinciarelli Alessandro (eds.) (2012). Cognitive Behavioural Systems. Springer.
    This book constitutes refereed proceedings of the COST 2102 International Training School on Cognitive Behavioural Systems held in Dresden, Germany, in February 2011. The 39 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from various submissions. The volume presents new and original research results in the field of human-machine interaction inspired by cognitive behavioural human-human interaction features. The themes covered are on cognitive and computational social information processing, emotional and social believable Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) systems, behavioural and contextual analysis (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Simon Bacon (2013). “We Can Rebuild Him!”: The Essentialisation of the Human/Cyborg Interface in the Twenty-First Century, or Whatever Happened to The Six Million Dollar Man? [REVIEW] AI and Society 28 (3):267-276.
    This paper aims to show how recent cinematic representations reveal a far more pessimistic and essentialised vision of Human/Cyborg hybridity in comparison with the more enunciative and optimistic ones seen at the end of the twentieth century. Donna Haraway’s still influential 1985 essay “A Cyborg Manifesto” saw the combination of the organic and the technological as offering new and exciting ways beyond the normalised culturally constructed categories of gender and identity formation. However, more recently critics see her later writings as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Christoph Bartneck, Tomohiro Suzuki, Takayuki Kanda & Tatsuya Nomura (2007). The Influence of People's Culture and Prior Experiences with Aibo on Their Attitude Towards Robots. AI and Society 21 (1-2):217-230.
    This paper presents a cross-cultural study on peoples’ negative attitude toward robots. 467 participants from seven different countries filled in the negative attitude towards robots scale survey which consists of 14 questions in three clusters: attitude towards the interaction with robots, attitude towards social influence of robots and attitude towards emotions in interaction with robots. Around one half of them were recruited at local universities and the other half was approached through Aibo online communities. The participants’ cultural background had a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  7. Anthony F. Beavers, Between Angels and Animals: The Question of Robot Ethics, or is Kantian Moral Agency Desirable?
    In this paper, I examine a variety of agents that appear in Kantian ethics in order to determine which would be necessary to make a robot a genuine moral agent. However, building such an agent would require that we structure into a robot’s behavioral repertoire the possibility for immoral behavior, for only then can the moral law, according to Kant, manifest itself as an ought, a prerequisite for being able to hold an agent morally accountable for its actions. Since building (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8. Christian Becker-Asano, Takayuki Kanda, Carlos Ishi & Hiroshi Ishiguro (2011). Studying Laughter in Combination with Two Humanoid Robots. AI and Society 26 (3):291-300.
    To let humanoid robots behave socially adequate in a future society, we started to explore laughter as an important para-verbal signal known to influence relationships among humans rather easily. We investigated how the naturalness of various types of laughter in combination with different humanoid robots was judged, first, within a situational context that is suitable for laughter and, second, without describing the situational context. Given the variety of human laughter, do people prefer a certain style for a robot’s laughter? And (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Tony Belpaeme & Anthony Morse (2010). Time Will Tell Why It is Too Early to Worry. [REVIEW] Interaction Studies 11 (2):191-195.
    The author reflects on the premature speculations of many commentators on robot caregivers. He argues on the commentator's ethical issues that it creates false beliefs in children, in which he says that the creation of false beliefs by their caretakers is part and parcel of childhood. He argues that societies are already delegated the childcare onto others such as school and since technology is often substituting for direct physical social contact, its time to embrace the robotic care.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10. W. A. Borody (2013). The Japanese Roboticist Masahiro Mori’s Buddhist Inspired Concept of “The Uncanny Valley". Journal of Evolution and Technology 23 (1):31-44.
    In 1970, the Japanese roboticist and practicing Buddhist Masahiro Mori wrote a short essay entitled “On the Uncanny Valley” for the journal Energy . Since the publication of this two-page essay, Mori’s concept of the Uncanny Valley has become part and parcel of the discourse within the fields of humanoid robotics engineering, the film industry, culture studies, and philosophy, most notably the philosophy of transhumanism. In this paper, the concept of the Uncanny Valley is discussed in terms of the contemporary (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Donald S. Borrett, David Shih, Michael Tomko, Sarah Borrett & Hon C. Kwan (2011). Hegelian Phenomenology and Robotics. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (01):219-235.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12. C. Breazeal & Rodney Brooks (2004). Robot Emotions: A Functional Perspective. In J. Fellous (ed.), Who Needs Emotions. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13. Selmer Bringsjord (2007). Ethical Robots: The Future Can Heed Us. [REVIEW] AI and Society 22 (4):539-550.
    Bill Joy’s deep pessimism is now famous. Why the Future Doesn’t Need Us, his defense of that pessimism, has been read by, it seems, everyone—and many of these readers, apparently, have been converted to the dark side, or rather more accurately, to the future-is-dark side. Fortunately (for us; unfortunately for Joy), the defense, at least the part of it that pertains to AI and robotics, fails. Ours may be a dark future, but we cannot know that on the basis of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14. Selmer Bringsjord (2004). On Building Robot Persons: Response to Zlatev. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 14 (3):381-385.
    Zlatev offers surprisingly weak reasoning in support of his view that robots with the right kind of developmental histories can have meaning. We ought nonetheless to praise Zlatev for an impressionistic account of how attending to the psychology of human development can help us build robots that appear to have intentionality.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (16 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Rodney Brooks (1991). Challenges for Complete Creature Architectures. In Jean-Arcady Meyer & Stewart W. Wilson (eds.), From Animals to Animats: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior (Complex Adaptive Systems). MIT Press.
    boundaries. It is impossible to do good science without having an appreciation for the problems and concepts in the other levels of abstraction (at least in the direction from biology towards physics), but there are whole sets of tools, methods of analysis, theories and explanations within each discipline which do not cross those boundaries.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  16. Rodney A. Brooks, Technologies for Human/Humanoid Natural Interactions.
    There are a number of reasons to be interested in building humanoid robots. They include (1) since almost all human artifacts have been designed to easy for humans to interact with, humanoid robots provide backward compatibility with the existing human constructed world, (2) humanoid robots provide a natural form for humans to operate through telepresence since they have the same kinematic design as humans themselves, (3) by building humanoid robots that model humans directly they will be a useful tool in (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Rodney A. Brooks, A Robot That Walks; Emergent Behaviors From a Carefully Evolved Network.
    Most animals have significant behavioral expertise built in without having to explicitly learn it all from scratch. This expertise is a product of evolution of the organism; it can be viewed as a very long term form of learning which provides a structured system within which individuals might learn more specialized skills or abilities. This paper suggests one possible mechanism for analagous robot evolution by describing a carefully designed series of networks, each one being a strict augmentation of the previous (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18. Rodney A. Brooks, Cynthia Breazeal, Matthew Marjanovic, Brian Scassellati & Matthew Williamson (1999). The Cog Project: Building a Humanoid Robot. Lecture Notes in Computer Science 1562:52-87.
    To explore issues of developmental structure, physical em- bodiment, integration of multiple sensory and motor systems, and social interaction, we have constructed an upper-torso humanoid robot called Cog. The robot has twenty-one degrees of freedom and a variety of sen- sory systems, including visual, auditory, vestibular, kinesthetic, and tac- tile senses. This chapter gives a background on the methodology that we have used in our investigations, highlights the research issues that have been raised during this project, and provides a summary (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  19. Rodney A. Brooks & Lynn Andrea Stein (1994). Building Brains for Bodies. Autonomous Robotics 1 (1):7-25.
    We describe a project to capitalize on newly available levels of computational resources in order to understand human cognition. We are building an integrated physical system including vision, sound input and output, and dextrous manipulation, all controlled by a continuously operating large scale parallel MIMD computer. The resulting system will learn to "think" by building on its bodily experiences to accomplish progressively more abstract tasks. Past experience suggests that in attempting to build such an integrated system we will have to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  20. Joanna J. Bryson (2010). Why Robot Nannies Probably Won't Do Much Psychological Damage. Interaction Studies 11 (2):196-200.
  21. Joanna J. Bryson (2006). The Attentional Spotlight (Dennett and the Cog Project). Minds and Machines 16 (1):21-28.
    One of the interesting and occasionally controversial aspects of Dennett’s career is his direct involvement in the scientific process. This article describes some of Dennett’s participation on one particular project conducted at MIT, the building of the humanoid robot named Cog. One of the intentions of this project, not to date fully realized, was to test Dennett’s multiple drafts theory of consciousness. I describe Dennett’s involvement and impact on Cog from the perspective of a graduate student. I also describe the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Alain Cardon (2006). Artificial Consciousness, Artificial Emotions, and Autonomous Robots. Cognitive Processing 7 (4):245-267.
  23. Antonio Chella (2007). Towards Robot Conscious Perception. In Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (eds.), Artificial Consciousness. Imprint Academic. pp. 124-140.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (2007). Artificial Consciousness. Imprint Academic.
    And why is there a subjective component to experience?). It is easy to see that the separation between Weak and Strong Artificial Consciousness mirrors the separation between the easy problems and the hard problems of consciousness.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  25. William Clancey (1995). How Situated Cognition is Different From Situated Robotics. In Luc Steels & Rodney Brooks (eds.), The "Artificial Life" Route to "Artificial Intelligence": Building Situated Embodied Agents. Hillsdale, Nj: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. pp. 227-236.
  26. Andy Clark & Rick Grush (1999). Towards a Cognitive Robotics. Adaptive Behavior 7 (1):5-16.
    There is a definite challenge in the air regarding the pivotal notion of internal representation. This challenge is explicit in, e.g., van Gelder, 1995; Beer, 1995; Thelen & Smith, 1994; Wheeler, 1994; and elsewhere. We think it is a challenge that can be met and that (importantly) can be met by arguing from within a general framework that accepts many of the basic premises of the work (in new robotics and in dynamical systems theory) that motivates such scepticism in the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  27. Mark Coeckelbergh (2011). You, Robot: On the Linguistic Construction of Artificial Others. [REVIEW] AI and Society 26 (1):61-69.
    How can we make sense of the idea of ‘personal’ or ‘social’ relations with robots? Starting from a social and phenomenological approach to human–robot relations, this paper explores how we can better understand and evaluate these relations by attending to the ways our conscious experience of the robot and the human–robot relation is mediated by language. It is argued that our talk about and to robots is not a mere representation of an objective robotic or social-interactive reality, but rather interprets (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  28. David Cole (2010). Anthony Chemero: Radical Embodied Cognitive Science. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 20 (3):475-479.
  29. Roberto Cordeschi (2008). Cybernetics. In L. Floridi (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information. Blackwell.
    The term cybernetics was first used in 1947 by Norbert Wiener with reference to the centrifugal governor that James Watt had fitted to his steam engine, and above all to Clerk Maxwell, who had subjected governors to a general mathematical treatment in 1868. Wiener used the word “governor” in the sense of the Latin corruption of the Greek term kubernetes, or “steersman.” Wiener defined cybernetics as the study of “control and communication in the animal and the machine” (Wiener 1948). This (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Roberto Cordeschi (2002). The Discovery of the Artificial: Behavior, Mind and Machines Before and Beyond Cybernetics. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Since the second half of the XXth century, researchers in cybernetics and AI, neural nets and connectionism, Artificial Life and new robotics have endeavoured to build different machines that could simulate functions of living organisms, such as adaptation and development, problem solving and learning. In this book these research programs are discussed, particularly as regard the epistemological issues of the behaviour modelling. One of the main novelty of this book consists of the fact that certain projects involving the building of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  31. Lisa Damm (2011). Moral Machines: Teaching Robots Right From Wrong. Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):149 - 153.
  32. John Danaher (forthcoming). Robots, Law and the Retribution Gap. Ethics and Information Technology.
    We are living through an era of increased robotisation. Some authors have already begun to explore the impact of this robotisation on legal rules and practice. In doing so, many highlight potential liability gaps that might arise through robot misbehaviour. Although these gaps are interesting and socially significant, they do not exhaust the possible gaps that might be created by increased robotisation. In this article, I make the case for one of those alternative gaps: the retribution gap. This gap arises (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Kerstin Dautenhahn (2008). "Special Issue on" Human and Robot Interactive Communication". Interaction Studies 9 (2):175-178.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Kerstin Dautenhahn, Bernard Ogden, Tom Quick & Tom Ziemke (2002). From Embodied to Socially Embedded Agents: Implications for Interaction-Aware Robots. Cognitive Systems Research 3 (1):397-427.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35. Daniel Dennett, Cog as a Thought Experiment.
    In her presentation at the Monte Verità workshop, Maja Mataric showed us a videotape of her robots cruising together through the lab, and remarked, aptly: "They're flocking, but that's not what they think they're doing." This is a vivid instance of a phenomenon that lies at the heart of all the research I learned about at Monte Verità: the execution of surprisingly successful "cognitive" behaviors by systems that did not explicitly represent, and did not need to explicitly represent, what they (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Daniel C. Dennett (1995). Cog: Steps Toward Consciousness in Robots. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Conscious Experience. Ferdinand Schoningh. pp. 471--487.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Matthew Elton (1997). Robots and Rights: The Ethical Demands of Artificial Agents. Ends and Means 1 (2).
  38. J. Fellous (ed.) (2004). Who Needs Emotions: The Brain Meets the Robot. Oxford University Press.
    By contrast, the editors of this book have assembled a panel of experts in neuroscience and artificial intelligence who have dared to tackle the issue of...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  39. Kerstin Fischer, Kilian Foth, Katharina J. Rohlfing & Britta Wrede (2011). Mindful Tutors: Linguistic Choice and Action Demonstration in Speech to Infants and a Simulated Robot. Interaction Studies 12 (1):134-161.
    It has been proposed that the design of robots might benefit from interactions that are similar to caregiver-child interactions, which is tailored to children's respective capacities to a high degree. However, so far little is known about how people adapt their tutoring behaviour to robots and whether robots can evoke input that is similar to child-directed interaction. The paper presents detailed analyses of speakers' linguistic behaviour and non-linguistic behaviour, such as action demonstration, in two comparable situations: In one experiment, parents (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  40. Kenneth M. Ford, C. Glymour & Patrick Hayes (eds.) (1994). Android Epistemology. MIT Press.
  41. Marcello Frixione & Antonio Lieto (2013). Dealing with Concepts: From Cognitive Psychology to Knowledge Representation. Frontiers of Psychological and Behevioural Science 2 (3):96-106.
    Concept representation is still an open problem in the field of ontology engineering and, more generally, of knowledge representation. In particular, the issue of representing “non classical” concepts, i.e. concepts that cannot be defined in terms of necessary and sufficient conditions, remains unresolved. In this paper we review empirical evidence from cognitive psychology, according to which concept representation is not a unitary phenomenon. On this basis, we sketch some proposals for concept representation, taking into account suggestions from psychological research. In (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Marcello Frixione & Antonio Lieto (2012). Representing Concepts in Formal Ontologies: Compositionality Vs. Typicality Effects". Logic and Logical Philosophy 21 ( Logic, Reasoning and Rationalit):391-414.
    The problem of concept representation is relevant for many sub-fields of cognitive research, including psychology and philosophy, as well as artificial intelligence. In particular, in recent years it has received a great deal of attention within the field of knowledge representation, due to its relevance for both knowledge engineering as well as ontology-based technologies. However, the notion of a concept itself turns out to be highly disputed and problematic. In our opinion, one of the causes of this state of affairs (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Shaun Gallagher (2013). You and I, Robot. AI and Society 28 (4):455-460.
    I address a number of issues related to building an autonomous social robot. I review different approaches to social cognition and ask how these different approaches may inform the design of social robots. I argue that regardless of which theoretical approach to social cognition one favors, instantiating that approach in a workable robot will involve designing that robot on enactive principles.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. James Gips (1994). Toward the Ethical Robot. In Kenneth M. Ford, C. Glymour & Patrick Hayes (eds.), Android Epistemology. MIT Press.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  45. Matthew E. Gladden (2016). A Typology of Posthumanism: A Framework for Differentiating Analytic, Synthetic, Theoretical, and Practical Posthumanisms. In Sapient Circuits and Digitalized Flesh: The Organization as Locus of Technological Posthumanization. Defragmenter Media. pp. 31-91.
    The term ‘posthumanism’ has been employed to describe a diverse array of phenomena ranging from academic disciplines and artistic movements to political advocacy campaigns and the development of commercial technologies. Such phenomena differ widely in their subject matter, purpose, and methodology, raising the question of whether it is possible to fashion a coherent definition of posthumanism that encompasses all phenomena thus labelled. In this text, we seek to bring greater clarity to this discussion by formulating a novel conceptual framework for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Matthew E. Gladden (2014). The Social Robot as ‘Charismatic Leader’: A Phenomenology of Human Submission to Nonhuman Power. In Johanna Seibt, Raul Hakli & Marco Nørskov (eds.), Sociable Robots and the Future of Social Relations: Proceedings of Robo-Philosophy 2014. IOS Press. pp. 329-339.
    Much has been written about the possibility of human trust in robots. In this article we consider a more specific relationship: that of a human follower’s obedience to a social robot who leads through the exercise of referent power and what Weber described as ‘charismatic authority.’ By studying robotic design efforts and literary depictions of robots, we suggest that human beings are striving to create charismatic robot leaders that will either (1) inspire us through their display of superior morality; (2) (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Patrick Grüneberg & Kenji Suzuki (2013). A Lesson From Subjective Computing: Autonomous Self-Referentiality and Social Interaction as Conditions for Subjectivity. AISB Proceedings 2012:18-28.
    In this paper, we model a relational notion of subjectivity by means of two experiments in subjective computing. The goal is to determine to what extent a cognitive and social robot can be regarded to act subjectively. The system was implemented as a reinforcement learning agent with a coaching function. To analyze the robotic agent we used the method of levels of abstraction in order to analyze the agent at four levels of abstraction. At one level the agent is described (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Stevan Harnad, Spielberg's Ai: Another Cuddly No-Brainer.
    AI is about a "robot" boy who is "programmed" to love his adoptive human mother but is discriminated against because he is just a robot. I put both "robot" and "programmed" in scarequotes, because these are the two things that should have been given more thought before making the movie. (Most of this critique also applies to the short story by Brian Aldiss that inspired the movie, but the buck stops with the film as made, and its maker.).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. L. Hauser (1994). Acting, Intending, and Artificial Intelligence. Philosophical Explorations 22 (1):22-28.
    Hauser considers John Searle's attempt to distinguish acts from movements. On Searle's account, the difference between me raising my arm and my arm's just going up (e.g., if you forcibly raise it), is the causal involvement of my intention to raise my arm in the former, but not the latter, case. Yet, we distinguish a similar difference between a robot's raising its arm and its robot arm just going up (e.g., if you manually raise it). Either robots are rightly credited (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50. Hyun-Hee Heo & Min-Sun Kim (2013). The Effects of Multiculturalism and Mechanistic Disdain for Robots in Human-to-Robot Communication Scenarios. Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 14 (1):81-106.
    No categories
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 136