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  1. A Reformulation of the Social Brain Theory for Schizophrenia The Case for Out-Group Intolerance.Riadh T. Abed & Mohammed J. Abbas - 2011 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (2):132-151.
    The etiology of schizophrenia remains heavily contested despite extensive research, huge quantities of data, and heavy investment in time and material resources around the world. Not only is there little agreement about the causes of this most devastating of psychiatric conditions, but there is disagreement as to whether the condition exists at all as a coherent entity (Bentall 2006). Evolutionary theorists have had the added problem of explaining how a severe mental illness that causes a significant reproductive disadvantage can continue (...)
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  2. Impaired Theory of Mind in Schizophrenia.A. Abu-Akel - 1999 - Pragmatics and Cognition 7 (2):247-282.
    The study argues that linguistic/communication dysfunctions present in disorganized schizophrenia may stem, at least in part, from an impaired theory of mind. Using pragmatics and systemic linguistic theory, the study examined speech samples of two disorganized schizophrenic patients and attempted to determine if their communicative failures are because they lack theory of mind in the sense that they do not take into account the interlocutor's mind, i.e., the interlocutor's intentions, dispositions, and knowledge; or because they have a hyper-theory of mind (...)
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  3. Impaired Theory of Mind in Schizophrenia.Ahmad Abu-Akel - 1999 - Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 7 (2):247-282.
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  4. The Time Course and Characteristics of Procedural Learning in Schizophrenia Patients and Healthy Individuals.Yael Adini, Yoram S. Bonneh, Seva Komm, Lisa Deutsch & David Israeli - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  5. Evolutionary Psychiatry and the Schizophrenia Paradox: A Critique.Pieter R. Adriaens - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (4):513-528.
    Evolutionary psychiatrists invariably consider schizophrenia to be a paradox: how come natural selection has not yet eliminated the infamous ‘genes for schizophrenia’ if the disorder simply crushes the reproductive success of its carriers, if it has been around for thousands of years already, and if it has a uniform prevalence throughout the world? Usually, the answer is that the schizophrenic genotype is subject to some kind of balancing selection: the benefits it confers would then outbalance the obvious damage it does. (...)
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  6. ""The" Clever Hans" Phenomenon in Animal Models of Schizophrenia, or Homology as an Important Factor in Comparing Behavioral Functions Across Species.S. Ahlenius - 1991 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 34 (2):219.
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  7. Emotional Prosody Modulates Attention in Schizophrenia Patients with Hallucinations.L. Alba-Ferrara, G. A. de Erausquin, M. Hirnstein, S. Weis & M. Hausmann - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  8. Shot Through with Voices: Dissociation Mediates the Relationship Between Varieties of Inner Speech and Auditory Hallucination Proneness.Ben Alderson-Day, Simon McCarthy-Jones, Sarah Bedford, Hannah Collins, Holly Dunne, Chloe Rooke & Charles Fernyhough - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 27:288-296.
  9. Underconstrained Perception or Underconstrained Theory?André Aleman, Edward H. F. de Haan & René S. Kahn - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):787-788.
    Although the evidence remains tentative at best, the conception of hallucinations in schizophrenia as being underconstrained perception resulting from intrinsic thalamocortical resonance in sensory areas might complement current models of hallucination. However, in itself, the approach falls short of comprehensively explaining the neurogenesis of hallucinations in schizophrenia, as it neglects the role of external attributional biases, mental imagery, and a disconnection between frontal and temporal areas.
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  10. A Three-Component Analysis of Hoffman's Model of Verbal Hallucinations.Heidelinde Allen - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):518.
  11. Schizophrenia in an Evolutionary Perspective.John S. Allen & Vincent M. Sarich - 1988 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 32 (1):132-153.
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  12. Finding Partnership: The Benefit of Sharing and the Capacity for Complexity.Michaela Amering - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):77-79.
  13. Is Schizophrenia a Disorder of Memory or Consciousness?N. Andreasen - 2000 - In Endel Tulving (ed.), Memory, Consciousness, and the Brain: The Tallinn Conference. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.
  14. Conscious Compensations for Thought Insertion.R. Area, A. Garcia-Caballero, I. Gómez, M. J. Somoza, I. Garcia-Lado, M. J. Recimil & L. Vila - 2003 - Psychopathology 36 (3):129-131.
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  15. Schizotypal Personality Traits and Prediction of One's Own Movements in Motor Control: What Causes an Abnormal Sense of Agency?T. Asai, E. Sugimori & Y. Tanno - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1131-1142.
    Background. Positive schizophrenic symptoms, especially passivity phenomena, including auditory hallucinations, may be caused by an abnormal sense of agency, which people with schizotypal personality traits also tend to exhibit. A sense of agency asserts that it is oneself who is causing or generating an action. It is possible that this abnormal sense of self-agency is attributable to the abnormal prediction of one’s own movements in motor control. Method. We conducted an experiment using the “disappeared cursor” paradigm in which non-clinical, healthy (...)
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  16. Rubber Hand Illusion, Empathy, and Schizotypal Experiences in Terms of Self-Other Representations.Tomohisa Asai, Zhu Mao, Eriko Sugimori & Yoshihiko Tanno - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1744-1750.
    When participants observed a rubber hand being touched, their sense of touch was activated . While this illusion might be caused by multi-modal integration, it may also be related to empathic function, which enables us to simulate the observed information. We examined individual differences in the RHI, including empathic and schizotypal personality traits, as previous research had suggested that schizophrenic patients would be more subject to the RHI. The results indicated that people who experience a stronger RHI might have stronger (...)
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  17. Common Ground, Corrections, and Coordination.Nicholas Asher & Anthony Gillies - 2003 - Argumentation 17 (4):481-512.
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  18. To Tell or Not to Tell the Diagnosis of Schizophrenia.J. M. Atkinson - 1989 - Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (1):21-24.
    Some patients with schizophrenia are not told their diagnosis. The moral, clinical and practical issues involved in telling or not telling the patient are discussed. In some cases a relative is told the diagnosis but not the patient. The implications for the family and clinical outcome are outlined. A case history illustrating some of these issues is presented.
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  19. Review of Jonathan Metzl, The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease. [REVIEW]Julie M. Aultman - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (11):37-38.
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  20. The Hallucinatory Epoché1.Jean-Michel Azorin & Jean Naudin - 1997 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 28 (2):171-195.
    This paper focuses on the phenomenological significance of schizophrenics' auditory hallucinations and begins with the face-to-face relationship in order to describe the schizophrenic experience. Following European psychiatrists like Blackenburg and Tatossian, the authors compare the bracketing of reality in the Husserlian phenomenological reduction with that of the hallucinatory experience. "Hallucinatory epoché" is used to refer to the schizophrenic way to experiencing auditory hallucinations. The problem of intentionality is then discussed, in addition to that of dialogue, internal time, living body, and (...)
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  21. States of Consciousness in Schizophrenia: A Metacognitive Approach to Semantic Memory.E. Bacon & J. M. Danion - 2000 - Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S43 - S44.
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  22. Consciousness in Schizophrenia: A Metacognitive Approach to Semantic Memory.E. Bacon, J. M. Danion, F. Kauffmann-Muller & A. Bruant - 2001 - Consciousness and Cognition 10 (4):473-484.
    Recent studies have shown that schizophrenia may be a disease affecting the states of consciousness. The present study is aimed at investigating metamemory, i.e., the knowledge about one's own memory capabilities, in patients with schizophrenia. The accuracy of the Confidence level (CL) in the correctness of the answers provided during a recall phase, and the predictability of the Feeling of Knowing (FOK) when recall fails were measured using a task consisting of general information questions and assessing semantic memory. Nineteen outpatients (...)
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  23. Metamemory Knowledge and Beliefs in Patients with Schizophrenia and How These Relate to Objective Cognitive Abilities.Elisabeth Bacon, Nathalie Huet & Jean-Marie Danion - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1315-1326.
    Subjective reports and theories about memory may have an influence on other beliefs and behaviours. Patients with schizophrenia suffer a wide range of deficits affecting their awareness of daily life, including memory. With the Metamemory Inventory in Adulthood we ascertained patients’ memory knowledge and thoughts about their own cognitive capacities and about several aspects of cognitive functioning: personal capacities, knowledge of processes, use of strategies, perceived change with ageing, anxiety, motivation and mastery. The participants’ ratings were correlated with their intellectual, (...)
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  24. Theory of Mind and Schizophrenia☆.Rajendra D. Badgaiyan - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):320-322.
    A number of cognitive and behavioral variables influence the performance in tasks of theory of mind (ToM). Since two of the most important variables, memory and explicit expression, are impaired in schizophrenic patients, the ToM appears inconsistent in these patients. An ideal instrument of ToM should therefore account for deficient memory and impaired ability of these patients to explicitly express intentions. If such an instrument is developed, it should provide information that can be used not only to understand the pathophysiology (...)
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  25. Where the Rubber Meets the Road: The Importance of Implementation.Deanna M. Barch & Todd S. Braver - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):83-84.
    Phillips & Silverstein argue that a range of cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia result from a deficit in cognitive coordination attributable to NMDA receptor dysfunction. We suggest that the viability of this hypothesis would be further supported by explicit implementation in a computational framework that can produce quantitative estimates of the behavior of both healthy individuals and individuals with schizophrenia.
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  26. Cognition in Schizophrenia: Core Psychological and Neural Mechanisms.Deanna M. Barch & Alan Ceaser - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):27-34.
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  27. A Wide-Spectrum Coordination Model of Schizophrenia.Hendrik Pieter Barendregt - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):84-85.
    The target article presents a model for schizophrenia extending four levels of abstraction: molecules, cells, cognition, and syndrome. An important notion in the model is that of coordination, applicable to both the level of cells and of cognition. The molecular level provides an “implementation” of the coordination at the cellular level, which in turn underlies the coordination at the cognitive level, giving rise to the clinical symptoms.
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  28. Asynchrony, Implicational Meaning and the Experience of Self in Schizophrenia.Philip J. Barnard - 2003 - In Tilo Kircher & Anthony S. David (eds.), The Self in Neuroscience and Psychiatry. Cambridge University Press. pp. 121.
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  29. Bilateral Disadvantage: Lack of Interhemispheric Cooperation in Schizophrenia.K. Barnett, I. KIrk & M. Corballis - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2):436-444.
    Language anomalies and left-hemisphere dysfunction are commonly reported in schizophrenia. Additional evidence also suggests differences in the integration of information between the hemispheres. Bilateral gain is the increase in accuracy and decrease in latency that occurs when identical information is presented simultaneously to both hemispheres. This study measured bilateral gain in controls and individuals with schizophrenia using a lexical-decision task where word or non-word judgements were made to letter strings presented in the left visual field , right visual field or (...)
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  30. Neurobehavioral Disorders of Awareness and Their Relevance to Schizophrenia.W. B. Barr - 1998 - In Xavier F. Amador & Anthony S. David (eds.), Insight and Psychosis: Awareness of Illness in Schizophrenia and Related Disorders. Oxford University Press.
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  31. From the Problem of the Nature of Psychosis to the Phenomenological Reform of Psychiatry. Historical and Epistemological Remarks on Ludwig Binswanger’s Psychiatric Project.Elisabetta Basso - 2012 - Medicine Studies 3 (4):215-232.
    This paper focuses on one of the original moments of the development of the “phenomenological” current of psychiatry, namely, the psychopathological research of Ludwig Binswanger. By means of the clinical and conceptual problem of schizophrenia as it was conceived and developed at the beginning of the twentieth century, I will try to outline and analyze Binswanger’s perspective from a both historical and epistemological point of view. Binswanger’s own way means of approaching and conceiving schizophrenia within the scientific, medical, and psychiatric (...)
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  32. The Schizophrenias as Disorders of Self Consciousness.Sean E. Baumann - 2005 - South African Psychiatry Review 8 (3):95-99.
  33. Picture Sequencing by Schizophrenic Patients.William W. Beatty, Zeljko Jocic & Nancy Monson - 1993 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (4):265-267.
  34. Differential Pharmacological Regulation of Drug Efflux and Pharmacoresistant Schizophrenia.Mary Bebawy & Manoranjenni Chetty - 2008 - Bioessays 30 (2):183-188.
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  35. Attentional Deficit Versus Impaired Reality Testing: What is the Role of Executive Dysfunction in Complex Visual Hallucinations?Ralf-Peter Behrendt - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):758-759.
    A “multifactorial” model should accommodate a psychological perspective, aiming to relate the phenomenology of complex visual hallucinations not only to neurobiological findings but also an understanding of the patient's psychological problems and situation in life. Greater attention needs to be paid to the role of the “lack of insight” patients may have into their hallucinations and its relationship to cognitive impairment.
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  36. Hallucinations in Schizophrenia, Sensory Impairment, and Brain Disease: A Unifying Model.Ralf-Peter Behrendt & Claire Young - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):771-787.
    Based on recent insight into the thalamocortical system and its role in perception and conscious experience, a unified pathophysiological framework for hallucinations in neurological and psychiatric conditions is proposed, which integrates previously unrelated neurobiological and psychological findings. Gamma-frequency rhythms of discharge activity from thalamic and cortical neurons are facilitated by cholinergic arousal and resonate in networks of thalamocortical circuits, thereby transiently forming assemblies of coherent gamma oscillations under constraints of afferent sensory input and prefrontal attentional mechanisms. If perception is based (...)
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  37. Psychopathology of Psychosis: Towards Integration From an Idealist Perspective.Ralf-Peter Behrendt & Claire Young - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):808-830.
    The commentators provide a wealth of additional neurobiological data that ought to be integrated in a comprehensive model. This response article, however, focuses on clarification of conceptual queries, thereby outlining the proposed theory of hallucinations more sharply, discussing its relationship with schizophrenia, and explaining why underconstrained thalamocortical activation may well be a candidate mechanism responsible for acute schizophrenic symptoms other than hallucinations.
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  38. Self-Awareness Deficits in Psychiatric Patients: Neurobiology, Assessment, and Treatment.Bernard D. Beitman & Jyotsna Nair - 2004 - W.W.Norton.
  39. Freedom and Schizophrenia.Istvan Benedek - 1982 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 3 (3):337-341.
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  40. Freedom and Schizophrenia.Istvan Benedek - 1982 - Metamedicine 3 (3):337-341.
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  41. Self-Images and Related Autobiographical Memories in Schizophrenia.Mehdi Bennouna-Greene, Fabrice Berna, Martin A. Conway, Clare J. Rathbone, Pierre Vidailhet & Jean-Marie Danion - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):247-257.
    Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness, which affects sense of identity. While the ability to have a coherent vision of the self relies partly on its reciprocal relationships with autobiographical memories, little is known about how memories ground “self-images” in schizophrenia. Twenty-five patients with schizophrenia and 25 controls were asked to give six autobiographical memories related to four self-statements they considered essential for defining their identity. Results showed that patients’ self-images were more passive than those of controls. Autobiographical memories underlying (...)
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  42. Verbal Hallucinations, Unintendedness, and the Validity of the Schizophrenia Diagnosis.R. P. Bentall & P. D. Slade - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):519.
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  43. Normativity and Rationality in Delusional Psychiatric Disorders.Jose Luis Bermudez - 2001 - Mind and Language 16 (5):457-493.
    Psychiatric treatment and diagnosis rests upon a richer conception of normativity than, for example, cognitive neuropsychology. This paper explores the role that considerations of rationality can play in defining this richer conception of normativity. It distinguishes two types of rationality and considers how each type can break down in different ways in delusional psychiatric disorders.
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  44. Impaired Ability to Give a Meaning to Personally Significant Events in Patients with Schizophrenia.Fabrice Berna, Mehdi Bennouna-Greene, Jevita Potheegadoo, Paulina Verry, Martin A. Conway & Jean-Marie Danion - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):703-711.
    Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness affecting sense of identity. Autobiographical memory deficits observed in schizophrenia could contribute to this altered sense of identity. The ability to give a meaning to personally significant events is also critical for identity construction and self-coherence. Twenty-four patients with schizophrenia and 24 control participants were asked to recall five self-defining memories. We assessed meaning making in participants’ narratives and afterwards asked them explicitly to give a meaning to their memories . We found that both (...)
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  45. The Natural Selection of Psychosis.Bernard Crespi - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):410-411.
    Diverse evidence from genomics, epidemiology, neurophysiology, psychology, and evolutionary biology converges on simple general mechanisms, based on negative secondary effects of strong selection, for how mental disorders such as psychosis have evolved and how they are sustained. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  46. The Genetics of Cognitive Impairment in Schizophrenia: A Phenomic Perspective.Robert M. Bilder, Andrew Howe, Nic Novak, Fred W. Sabb & D. Stott Parker - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (9):428-435.
  47. Does Consciousness Entail Subjectivity? The Puzzle of Thought Insertion.Alexandre Billon - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (2):291 - 314.
    (2013). Does consciousness entail subjectivity? The puzzle of thought insertion. Philosophical Psychology: Vol. 26, No. 2, pp. 291-314. doi: 10.1080/09515089.2011.625117.
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  48. Jaspers' Dilemma: The Psychopathological Challenge to Subjectivity Theories of Consciousness.Alexandre Billon & Uriah Kriegel - 2015 - In R. Gennaro (ed.), Disturbed Consciousness. MIT Press. pp. 29-54.
    According to what we will call subjectivity theories of consciousness, there is a constitutive connection between phenomenal consciousness and subjectivity: there is something it is like for a subject to have mental state M only if M is characterized by a certain mine-ness or for-me-ness. Such theories appear to face certain psychopathological counterexamples: patients appear to report conscious experiences that lack this subjective element. A subsidiary goal of this chapter is to articulate with greater precision both subjectivity theories and the (...)
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  49. Wellbeing, Schizophrenia and Experience Machines.David Rhys Birks - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (2):81-88.
    In the USA and England and Wales, involuntary treatment for mental illness is subject to the constraint that it must be necessary for the health or safety of the patient, if he poses no danger to others. I will argue against this necessary condition of administering treatment and propose that the category of individuals eligible for involuntary treatment should be extended. I begin by focusing on the common disorder of schizophrenia and proceed to demonstrate that it can be a considerable (...)
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  50. Out-of-Body Experiences in Schizophrenia.Susan Blackmore - unknown
    Questionnaires on perceptual distortions, symptoms of schizophrenia, and out-of-body experiences (OBEs) were completed by 71 volunteers with a history of schizophrenia and 40 control subjects (patients in a hospital accident ward). Significantly more of the schizophrenics (42%) than of the control group (13%) answered "yes" to a question about OBEs. However, a follow-up questionnaire showed that only 14% of schizophrenics (i.e., the same as the control group) had had "typical" OBEs, in which a change of viewpoint was reported. Those reporting (...)
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