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  1. Les mégadonnées dans la recherche.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    L'éthique des mégadonnées implique l'adhésion aux concepts de bons et mauvais comportements concernant les données, en particulier les données personnelles. L'éthique des mégadonnées se concentre sur les collecteurs et diffuseurs des données structurés ou non structurés. L'éthique des mégadonnées est soutenue, au niveau de l'UE, par une documentation complète, qui cherche à trouver des solutions concrètes pour maximiser la valeur des mégadonnées sans sacrifier les droits humains fondamentaux. Le Contrôleur européen de la protection des données (CEPD) soutient le droit à (...)
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  2. Conceptual Stewardship and Ethics Centers in Advance.Jonathan Beever - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
  3. Ancestor Simulations and the Dangers of Simulation Probes.David Braddon-Mitchell & Andrew J. Latham - forthcoming - Erkenntnis.
    Preston Greene (2020) argues that we should not conduct simulation investigations because of the risk that we might be terminated if our world is a simulation designed to research various counterfactuals about the world of the simulators. In response, we propose a sequence of arguments, most of which have the form of an "even if” response to anyone unmoved by our previous arguments. It runs thus: (i) if simulation is possible, then simulators are as likely to care about simulating simulations (...)
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  4. The Mission Before the Mission: Toward an Ethics of Ethics Centers in Advance.Cordula Brand & Thomas Potthast - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
  5. On Ethics Institute Activism in Advance.Michael Burroughs - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
  6. Ancillary Care Obligations in Light of an African Bioethic: From Entrustment to Communion (Repr.).Thaddeus Metz - forthcoming - In Ike Iyioke (ed.), African Research Ethics (tentative title). Brill.
    Reprint of an article that first appeared in Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics (2017).
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  7. Demonstrating Ethical Leadership in a Virtual World: Accessibility, Community, and Identity.Nate Olson & Kallee McCullough - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
    During the COVID-19 pandemic, ethics centers were forced to reimagine program delivery. In a tumultuous time with rampant social isolation, the need for ethics education and dialogue was also critical. The authors, members of the directorship team of the Kegley Institute of Ethics, discuss how KIE met these challenges through organizing over fifty online events during the pandemic, including webinars, pedagogy workshops, ethics bowls, intercollegiate student conversations, colloquia, film viewings, and podcasts. The article describes both the opportunities and challenges that (...)
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  8. Ethics Centers’ Conflicts of Interest and the Failure of Disclosure to Remedy This Endemic Problem in Advance.Lisa S. Parker - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
  9. In Support of a “Generalist” Orientation for an Ethics Center in Advance.Michael S. Pritchard & Sandra L. Borden - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
  10. Decentering an Engineering Ethics Center in Advance.Donna Riley, Justin Hess & Brent Jesiek - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
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  11. Navigating Conflicts of Justice in the Use of Race and Ethnicity in Precision Medicine.G. Owen Schaefer, Tai E. Shyong & Shirley Hsiao-Li Sun - forthcoming - Bioethics (Early View).
    Given the sordid history of injustices linking genetics to race and ethnicity, considerations of justice are central to ensuring the responsible development of precision medicine programmes around the world. While considerations of justice may be in tension with other areas of concern, such as scientific value or privacy, there are also be tensions between different aspects of justice. This paper focuses on three particular aspects of justice relevant to this context: social justice, distributive justice and human rights. The implications of (...)
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  12. Ethical Issues in Multilingual Research Situations: A Focus on Interview-Based Research.Natalie Schembri & Alma Jahić Jašić - forthcoming - Research Ethics:174701612210858.
    Research Ethics, Ahead of Print. Interview-based research in multilingual situations can present researchers with specific ethical challenges relating to language-based power play, data handling and presentation. Studies indicate favouring the L1 as an interviewing language may produce better quality data, but external pressures can favour English as the dominant research language. This article examines researcher perceptions and experiences of the ethical consequences of language choice and the practical issues involved. Interviews were conducted with five European researchers working on an interview-based (...)
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  13. Thinking About Values in Science: Ethical Versus Political Approaches.S. Andrew Schroeder - forthcoming - Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-10.
    Philosophers of science now broadly agree that doing good science involves making non-epistemic value judgments. I call attention to two very different normative standards which can be used to evaluate such judgments: standards grounded in ethics and standards grounded in political philosophy. Though this distinction has not previously been highlighted, I show that the values in science literature contain arguments of each type. I conclude by explaining why this distinction is important. Seeking to determine whether some value-laden determination meets substantive (...)
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  14. On the Structure of the Virtuous Ethics Center in Advance.Joseph Spino - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
  15. E-Cigarettes and the Multiple Responsibilities of the FDA.Larisa Svirsky, Dana Howard & Micah L. Berman - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics:1-10.
    This paper considers the responsibilities of the FDA with regard to disseminating information about the benefits and harms of e-cigarettes. Tobacco harm reduction advocates claim that the FDA has been overcautious and has violated ethical obligations by failing to clearly communicate to the public that e-cigarettes are far less harmful than cigarettes. We argue, by contrast, that the FDA’s obligations in this arena are more complex than they may appear at first blush. Though the FDA is accountable for informing the (...)
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  16. Experiences and Practices of Key Research Team Members in Obtaining Informed Consent for Pharmacogenetic Research Among People Living with HIV: A Qualitative Study.Nabukenya Sylvia, Ochieng Joseph, Kaawa-Mafigiri David, Munabi Ian, Nakigudde Janet, Nakwagala Frederick Nelson, Barugahare John, Kwagala Betty, Ibingira Charles, Twimwijukye Adelline, Sewankambo Nelson & Mwaka Erisa Sabakaki - forthcoming - Research Ethics:174701612210769.
    This study aimed to explore experiences and practices of key research team members in obtaining informed consent for pharmacogenetics research and to identify the approaches used for enhancing unde...
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  17. Joachim Schummer; Tom Børsen (Editors). Ethics of Chemistry: From Poison Gas to Climate Engineering. 568 Pp., Indexes. Hackensack, N.J.: World Scientific, 2021. $198 (Cloth); ISBN 9789811233531. E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Howard G. Barth - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):207-208.
  18. Waving Away Waivers: An Obligation to Contribute to ‘Herd Knowledge’ for Data Linkage Research?Owen M. Bradfield - 2022 - Research Ethics 18 (2):151-162.
    In today’s online data-driven world, people constantly shed data and deposit digital footprints. When individuals access health services, governments and health providers collect and store large volumes of health information about people that can later be retrieved, linked and analysed for research purposes. This can lead to new discoveries in medicine and healthcare. In addition, when securely stored and de-identified, the privacy risks are minimal and manageable. In many jurisdictions, ethics committees routinely waive the requirement for researchers to obtain consent (...)
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  19. Personalising the Dilemma: Research Ethics in Fiction.Sally Dalton-Brown - 2022 - Research Ethics 18 (2):114-125.
    Learning about research ethics and research integrity is greatly facilitated by case studies, which illuminate, ground and personalise abstract questions. This paper argues that fiction can provide similar learning experiences, incarnating ethical dilemmas through a medium that is highly accessible yet sophisticated in its depictions of how researchers behave. Examples of fictional illustrations are given to illustrate various themes such as animal experimentation, exploitation of the vulnerable, researcher bias and research fraud.
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  20. Sins of Inquiry: How to Criticize Scientific Pursuits.Marina DiMarco & Kareem Khalifa - 2022 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 92:86-96.
    Criticism is a staple of the scientific enterprise and of the social epistemology of science. Philosophical discussions of criticism have traditionally focused on its roles in relation to objectivity, confirmation, and theory choice. However, attention to criticism and to criticizability should also inform our thinking about scientific pursuits: the allocation of resources with the aim of developing scientific tools and ideas. In this paper, we offer an account of scientific pursuitworthiness which takes criticizability as its starting point. We call this (...)
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  21. Social Science as an Inherently Moral Endeavor.Blaine J. Fowers - 2022 - Journal of Moral Education 51 (1):35-46.
    ABSTRACT The purpose of this paper is to argue that social science is an inherently moral enterprise. There are four reasons to see science as a moral endeavor based on the neo-Aristotelian recognition that morality is centered on human goods, not just right action. First, science is guided by epistemic values and underwritten by pro-science traits. Second, the outcomes of applied science are valued by scientists and others. Third, attempting to eliminate values from science is counterproductive because it leads to (...)
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  22. Motives and Risk Perceptions of Participants in a Phase 1 Trial for Hepatitis C Virus Investigational Therapy in Pregnancy.Yasaswi Kislovskiy, Catherine Chappell, Emily Flaherty, Megan E. Hamm, Flor de Abril Cameron, Elizabeth Krans & Judy C. Chang - 2022 - Research Ethics 18 (2):132-150.
    Limited research has been done among pregnant people participating in investigational drug trials. To enhance the ethical understanding of pregnant people’s perspectives on research participation, we sought to describe motives and risk perceptions of participants in a phase 1 trial of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir treatment for chronic Hepatitis C virus during pregnancy. Pregnant people with chronic HCV infection enrolled in an open-label, phase 1 study of LDV/SOF participated in semi-structured, in-depth interviews to explore their reasons for participation and experiences within the study. (...)
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  23. Reporting and Discoverability of “Tweets” Quoted in Published Scholarship: Current Practice and Ethical Implications.Shannon Mason & Lenandlar Singh - 2022 - Research Ethics 18 (2):93-113.
    Research Ethics, Volume 18, Issue 2, Page 93-113, April 2022. Twitter is an increasingly common source of rich, personalized qualitative data, as millions of people daily share their thoughts on myriad topics. However, questions remain unclear concerning if and how to quote publicly available social media data ethically. In this study, focusing on 136 education manuscripts quoting 2667 Tweets, we look to investigate the ways in which Tweets are quoted, the ethical discussions forwarded and actions taken, and the extent to (...)
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  24. Scientific Journals Must Be Alert to Potential Manipulation in Citations and Referencing.Mina Mehregan - 2022 - Sage Publications Ltd: Research Ethics 18 (2):163-168.
    Research Ethics, Volume 18, Issue 2, Page 163-168, April 2022. Citation is an essential practice in scientific publishing. However, it is mandatory that citing the sources in a scientific work is performed in a proper manner. Manipulating citations in research articles is one form of academic research misconduct that violates publication ethics. Citation manipulation simply occurs for the purpose of increasing the number of citations of a researcher or a journal. Unfortunately, there has been a growing trend for this type (...)
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  25. The Sociological Determinants of Scientific Bias.Joseph H. Michalski - 2022 - Journal of Moral Education 51 (1):47-60.
    ABSTRACT Science is an ethical community whose practitioners aim to discover information about the natural world and to explain discernible patterns that might be detected. Those who pursue science generally embrace certain epistemic values that help establish the moral boundaries of the community, while the twin pillars of rationality and empiricism serve as the foundations upon which scientists establish their truth claims. Yet however robust the assertions might appear, they nevertheless are the by-products of an exclusively human endeavor directly impacted (...)
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  26. Hit by the Virtual Trolley: When is Experimental Ethics Unethical?Jon Rueda - 2022 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):7-27.
    The trolley problem is one of the liveliest research frameworks in experimental ethics. In the last decade, social neuroscience and experimental moral psychology have gone beyond the studies with mere text-based hypothetical moral dilemmas. In this article, I present the rationale behind testing the actual behaviour in more realistic scenarios through Virtual Reality and summarize the body of evidence raised by the experiments with virtual trolley scenarios. Then, I approach the argument of Ramirez and LaBarge (2020), who claim that the (...)
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  27. An Ethical Framework for Presenting Scientific Results to Policy-Makers.S. Andrew Schroeder - 2022 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 32 (1):33-67.
    Scientists have the ability to influence policy in important ways through how they present their results. Surprisingly, existing codes of scientific ethics have little to say about such choices. I propose that we can arrive at a set of ethical guidelines to govern scientists’ presentation of information to policymakers by looking to bioethics: roughly, just as a clinician should aim to promote informed decision-making by patients, a scientist should aim to promote informed decision-making by policymakers. Though this may sound like (...)
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  28. Public Trust in Science: Exploring the Idiosyncrasy-Free Ideal.Marion Boulicault & S. Andrew Schroeder - 2021 - In Kevin Vallier & Michael Weber (eds.), Social Trust. Routledge.
    What makes science trustworthy to the public? This chapter examines one proposed answer: the trustworthiness of science is based at least in part on its independence from the idiosyncratic values, interests, and ideas of individual scientists. That is, science is trustworthy to the extent that following the scientific process would result in the same conclusions, regardless of the particular scientists involved. We analyze this "idiosyncrasy-free ideal" for science by looking at philosophical debates about inductive risk, focusing on two recent proposals (...)
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  29. Ethical Challenges in the COVID-19 Research Context: A Toolkit for Supporting Analysis and Resolution.Clara Calia, Corinne Reid, Cristóbal Guerra, Abdul-Gafar Oshodi, Charles Marley, Action Amos, Paulina Barrera & Liz Grant - 2021 - Ethics and Behavior 31 (1):60-75.
    ABSTRACTCOVID-19 is compromising all aspects of society, with devastating impacts on health, political, social, economic and educational spheres. A premium is being placed on scientific research as the source of possible solutions, with a situational imperative to carry out investigations at an accelerated rate. There is a major challenge not to neglect ethical standards, in a context where doing so may mean the difference between life and death. In this paper we offer a rubric for considering the ethical challenges in (...)
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  30. Preventing Ethics Dumping: The Challenges for Kenyan Research Ethics Committees.Kate Chatfield, Doris Schroeder, Anastasia Guantai, Kirana Bhatt, Elizabeth Bukusi, Joyce Adhiambo Odhiambo, Julie Cook & Joshua Kimani - 2021 - Research Ethics 17 (1):23-44.
    Ethics dumping is the practice of undertaking research in a low- or middle-income setting which would not be permitted, or would be severely restricted, in a high-income setting. Whilst Kenya operates a sophisticated research governance system, resource constraints and the relatively low number of accredited research ethics committees limit the capacity for ensuring ethical compliance. As a result, Kenya has been experiencing cases of ethics dumping. This article presents 11 challenges in the context of preventing ethics dumping in Kenya, namely (...)
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  31. Personalising the Dilemma: Research Ethics in Fiction.Sally Dalton-Brown - 2021 - Sage Publications Ltd: Research Ethics 18 (2):114-125.
    Research Ethics, Volume 18, Issue 2, Page 114-125, April 2022. Learning about research ethics and research integrity is greatly facilitated by case studies, which illuminate, ground and personalise abstract questions. This paper argues that fiction can provide similar learning experiences, incarnating ethical dilemmas through a medium that is highly accessible yet sophisticated in its depictions of how researchers behave. Examples of fictional illustrations are given to illustrate various themes such as animal experimentation, exploitation of the vulnerable, researcher bias and research (...)
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  32. Expert Communication and the Self-Defeating Codes of Scientific Ethics.Hugh Desmond - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (1):24-26.
    Codes of ethics currently offer no guidance to scientists acting in capacity of expert. Yet communicating their expertise is one of the most important activities of scientists. Here I argue that expert communication has a specifically ethical dimension, and that experts must face a fundamental trade-off between "actionability" and "transparency" when communicating. Some recommendations for expert communication are suggested.
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  33. Precision Medicine, Data, and the Anthropology of Social Status.Hugh Desmond - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (4):80-83.
    The success of precision medicine depends on obtaining large amounts of information about at-risk populations. However, getting consent is often difficult. Why? In this commentary I point to the differentials in social status involved. These differentials are inevitable once personal information is surrendered, but are particularly intense when the studied populations are socioeconomically or socioculturally disadvantaged and/or ethnically stigmatized groups. I suggest how the deep distrust of the latter groups can be partially justified as a lack of confidence that their (...)
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  34. Research Integrity Codes of Conduct in Europe: Understanding the Divergences.Hugh Desmond & Kris Dierickx - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (5):414-428.
    In the past decade, policy-makers in science have been concerned with harmonizing research integrity standards across Europe. These standards are encapsulated in the European Code of Conduct for Research Integrity. Yet, almost every European country today has its own national-level code of conduct for research integrity. In this study we document in detail how national-level codes diverge on almost all aspects concerning research integrity – except for what constitutes egregious misconduct. Besides allowing for potentially unfair responses to joint misconduct by (...)
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  35. Trust and Professionalism in Science: Medical Codes as a Model for Scientific Negligence?Hugh Desmond & Kris Dierickx - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-11.
    Background Professional communities such as the medical community are acutely concerned with negligence: the category of misconduct where a professional does not live up to the standards expected of a professional of similar qualifications. Since science is currently strengthening its structures of self-regulation in parallel to the professions, this raises the question to what extent the scientific community is concerned with negligence, and if not, whether it should be. By means of comparative analysis of medical and scientific codes of conduct, (...)
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  36. The Use of Confidentiality and Anonymity Protections as a Cover for Fraudulent Fieldwork Data.M. V. Dougherty - 2021 - Research Ethics 17 (4):480-500.
    Qualitative fieldwork research on sensitive topics sometimes requires that interviewees be granted confidentiality and anonymity. When qualitative researchers later publish their findings, they must ensure that any statements obtained during fieldwork interviews cannot be traced back to the interviewees. Given these protections to interviewees, the integrity of the published findings cannot usually be verified or replicated by third parties, and the scholarly community must trust the word of qualitative researchers when they publish their results. This trust is fundamentally abused, however, (...)
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  37. Governing AI-Driven Health Research: Are IRBs Up to the Task?Phoebe Friesen, Rachel Douglas-Jones, Mason Marks, Robin Pierce, Katherine Fletcher, Abhishek Mishra, Jessica Lorimer, Carissa Véliz, Nina Hallowell, Mackenzie Graham, Mei Sum Chan, Huw Davies & Taj Sallamuddin - 2021 - Ethics and Human Research 2 (43):35-42.
    Many are calling for concrete mechanisms of oversight for health research involving artificial intelligence (AI). In response, institutional review boards (IRBs) are being turned to as a familiar model of governance. Here, we examine the IRB model as a form of ethics oversight for health research that uses AI. We consider the model's origins, analyze the challenges IRBs are facing in the contexts of both industry and academia, and offer concrete recommendations for how these committees might be adapted in order (...)
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  38. Ethics of Contributor Role Ontologies and Taxonomies.Mohammad Hosseini - 2021 - Dissertation, Dublin City University
    First introduced in 2015, Contributor Role Ontologies and Taxonomies are the most recent innovation developed to address ethical issues of scholarly authorship. By providing a standard list of roles to specify individual contributions to publications, CROTs enhance transparency and consistency about the reporting of conducted tasks, and accordingly, improve the attribution of credit and responsibilities. Although various parties such as academic journals and universities are increasingly adopting CROTs, thus far no study has evaluated them from an ethical perspective. To fill (...)
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  39. Well-Ordered Science and Public Trust in Science.Gürol Irzik & Faik Kurtulmus - 2021 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 19):4731-4748.
    Building, restoring and maintaining well-placed trust between scientists and the public is a difficult yet crucial social task requiring the successful cooperation of various social actors and institutions. Kitcher’s takes up this challenge in the context of liberal democratic societies by extending his ideal model of “well-ordered science” that he had originally formulated in his. However, Kitcher nowhere offers an explicit account of what it means for the public to invest epistemic trust in science. Yet in order to understand how (...)
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  40. A Scoping Review of the Literature Featuring Research Ethics and Research Integrity Cases.Péter Kakuk, Soren Holm, János Kristóf Bodnár, Mohammad Hosseini, Jonathan Lewis, Bert Gordijn & Anna Catharina Vieira Armond - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-14.
    BackgroundThe areas of Research Ethics and Research Integrity are rapidly evolving. Cases of research misconduct, other transgressions related to RE and RI, and forms of ethically questionable behaviors have been frequently published. The objective of this scoping review was to collect RE and RI cases, analyze their main characteristics, and discuss how these cases are represented in the scientific literature.MethodsThe search included cases involving a violation of, or misbehavior, poor judgment, or detrimental research practice in relation to a normative framework. (...)
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  41. Bridging the Gap: Ethical Considerations of Providing Psychological Assessment Results in Research Studies.Alexandra C. Kirsch, Michael J. Zaccariello, Jennifer B. McCormick, Richard R. Sharp, Randall P. Flick & David O. Warner - 2021 - Ethics and Behavior 31 (6):381-394.
    ABSTRACT There is limited guidance about whether and how to provide psychological assessment results to research participants. This paper considers several ethical challenges associated with offering individual research results in psychological assessment research. Additionally, the process used to return individual results within a study examining neurodevelopmental effects of anesthesia exposure in children and adolescents is described. Almost all participants requested to know if results were concerning; however, only around a third of those with concerning findings sought additional feedback. Ongoing research (...)
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  42. Reconsidering the Ethics of Exclusion Criteria in Research on Digital Mental Health Interventions.Hugh C. McCall, Heather D. Hadjistavropoulos & Lynn Loutzenhiser - 2021 - Ethics and Behavior 31 (3):171-180.
    ABSTRACT Digital mental health interventions have emerged as a promising means of expanding access to mental healthcare. Prospective participants reporting severe symptoms or suicidal ideation are often excluded from DMHI trials and may struggle to access alternative treatments. However, evidence suggests that DMHIs are efficacious for people reporting these characteristics. We suggest that there are risks to both including and excluding people from DMHI trials, and we urge researchers to ensure that their eligibility criteria are designed in an evidence-based and (...)
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  43. Normative Framework of Informed Consent in Clinical Research in Germany, Poland, and Russia.Marcin Orzechowski, Katarzyna Woniak, Cristian Timmermann & Florian Steger - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-10.
    Background: Biomedical research nowadays is increasingly carried out in multinational and multicenter settings. Due to disparate national regulations on various ethical aspects, such as informed consent, there is the risk of ethical compromises when involving human subjects in research. Although the Declaration of Helsinki is the point of reference for ethical conduct of research on humans, national normative requirements may diverge from its provisions. The aim of this research is to examine requirements on informed consent in biomedical research in Germany, (...)
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  44. Improving the Ethical Review of Health Policy and Systems Research: Some Suggestions.Govind Persad - 2021 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 49 (1):123-125.
    Consistent and well-designed frameworks for ethical oversight enable socially valuable research while forestalling harmful or poorly designed studies. I suggest some alterations that might strengthen the valuable checklist Rattani & Hyder propose for the ethical review of health policy and systems research (HPSR), or prompt future work in the area.
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  45. Should Acknowledgments in Published Academic Articles Include Gratitude for Reviewers Who Reviewed for Journals That Rejected Those Articles?Joona Räsänen & Pekka Louhiala - 2021 - Theoria 87 (3):713-728.
    It is a common practice for authors of an academic work to thank the anonymous reviewers at the journal that is publishing it. Allegedly, scholars thank the reviewers because their comments improved the paper and thanking them is a proper way to show gratitude to them. Yet often, a paper that is eventually accepted by one journal is first rejected by other journals, and even though those journals’ reviewers also supply comments that improve the quality of the work, those reviewers (...)
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  46. Psychiatric Research Ethics.Dominic Sisti & William R. Smith - 2021 - In Ana S. Iltis & Douglas MacKay (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Research Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Psychiatric research often poses special ethical concerns. This chapter first provides historical context, including scandals that stoked public concern about psychiatric research and led to the promulgation of canonical documents and bioethics scholarship, and then explores issues related to the decision-making capacity and safety of participants—including the use of placebos and washout periods, the design of suicide prevention studies, and research in emergency psychiatry. The chapter then describes how shifting models of psychiatric nosology have precipitated conflicts in the determination of (...)
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  47. Conducting Epigenetics Research with Refugees and Asylum Seekers: Attending to the Ethical Challenges.Faten Taki & Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2021 - Clinical Epigenetics 13 (1):105-.
    An increase in global violence has forced the displacement of more than 70 million people, including 26 million refugees and 3.5 asylum seekers. Refugees and asylum seekers face serious socioeconomic and healthcare barriers and are therefore particularly vulnerable to physical and mental health risks, which are sometimes exacerbated by immigration policies and local social discriminations. Calls for a strong evidence base for humanitarian action have encouraged conducting research to address the barriers and needs of refugees and asylum seekers. Given the (...)
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  48. Against the Precautionary Approach to Moral Status: The Case of Surrogates for Living Human Brains.Tomasz Żuradzki - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (1):53-56.
    My paper builds on the conceptual tools from three interrelated philosophical debates that—as I believe—may help structure important if chaotic discussions about surrogates for living human brains and resolve some practical issues related to regulatory matters. In particular, I refer to the discussions about the “moral precautionary principle” in research ethics (Koplin and Wilkinson 2019); about normative uncertainty in ethics (MacAskill, Bykvist, and Ord 2020), and about the inductive risk problem for animal welfare scientists (Birch 2018). I elucidate upon the (...)
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  49. Public Interest in Health Data Research: Laying Out the Conceptual Groundwork.Angela Ballantyne & G. Owen Schaefer - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (9):610-616.
    The future of health research will be characterised by three continuing trends: rising demand for health data; increasing impracticability of obtaining specific consent for secondary research; and decreasing capacity to effectively anonymise data. In this context, governments, clinicians and the research community must demonstrate that they can be responsible stewards of health data. IRBs and RECs sit at heart of this process because in many jurisdictions they have the capacity to grant consent waivers when research is judged to be of (...)
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  50. Whether to Waive Parental Permission in HIV Prevention Research Among Adolescents: Ethical and Legal Considerations.Laurie J. Bauman, Claude Ann Mellins & Robert Klitzman - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (1):188-201.
    Critical ethical questions arise concerning whether studies among adolescents of new behavioral and biomedical HIV preventive interventions such as Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis should obtain parental permission. This paper examines the relevant regulations and ethical guidance concerning waivers of parental permission, and arguments for and against such waivers. Opponents of such waivers may argue that adolescent decision-making is “too immature” and that parents always have rights to decide how to protect their children. Yet requiring parental permission may put adolescents at risk, and/or (...)
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