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  1. Les mégadonnées dans la recherche.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    L'éthique des mégadonnées implique l'adhésion aux concepts de bons et mauvais comportements concernant les données, en particulier les données personnelles. L'éthique des mégadonnées se concentre sur les collecteurs et diffuseurs des données structurés ou non structurés. L'éthique des mégadonnées est soutenue, au niveau de l'UE, par une documentation complète, qui cherche à trouver des solutions concrètes pour maximiser la valeur des mégadonnées sans sacrifier les droits humains fondamentaux. Le Contrôleur européen de la protection des données (CEPD) soutient le droit à (...)
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  2. Peer-reviewed climate change research has a transparency problem. The scientific community needs to do better.Adam Pollack, Jentry E. Campbell, Madison Condon, Courtney Cooper, Matteo Coronese, James Doss-Gollin, Prabhat Hegde, Casey Helgeson, Jan Kwakkel, Corey Lesk, Justin Mankin, Erin Mayfield, Samantha Roth, Vivek Srikrishnan, Nancy Tuana & Klaus Keller - manuscript
    Mission-oriented climate change research is often unverifiable. Therefore, many stakeholders look to peer-reviewed climate change research for trustworthy information about deeply uncertain and impactful phenomena. This is because peer-review signals that research has been vetted for scientific standards like reproducibility and replicability. Here we evaluate the transparency of research methodologies in mission-oriented computational climate research. We find that only five percent of our sample meets the minimal standard of fully open data and code required for reproducibility and replicability. The widespread (...)
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  3. Xenotransplantation Clinical Trials and Equitable Patient Selection.Christopher Bobier & Daniel Rodger - forthcoming - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics:1-10.
    Xenotransplant patient selection recommendations restrict clinical trial participation to seriously ill patients for whom alternative therapies are unavailable or who will likely die while waiting for an allotransplant. Despite a scholarly consensus that this is advisable, we propose to examine this restriction. We offer three lines of criticism: (1) The risk–benefit calculation may well be unfavorable for seriously ill patients and society; (2) the guidelines conflict with criteria for equitable patient selection; and (3) the selection of seriously ill patients may (...)
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  4. Ancestor Simulations and the Dangers of Simulation Probes.David Braddon-Mitchell & Andrew J. Latham - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-11.
    Preston Greene (2020) argues that we should not conduct simulation investigations because of the risk that we might be terminated if our world is a simulation designed to research various counterfactuals about the world of the simulators. In response, we propose a sequence of arguments, most of which have the form of an "even if” response to anyone unmoved by our previous arguments. It runs thus: (i) if simulation is possible, then simulators are as likely to care about simulating simulations (...)
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  5. The Mission before the Mission: Toward an Ethics of Ethics Centers in advance.Cordula Brand & Thomas Potthast - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
  6. The Belief Norm of Academic Publishing.Wesley Buckwalter - forthcoming - Ergo.
    The belief norm of academic publishing states that researchers should believe certain claims they publish. The purpose of this paper is to defend the belief norm of academic publishing. In its defense, the advantages and disadvantages of the belief norm are evaluated for academic research and for the publication system. It is concluded that while the norm does not come without costs, academic research systemically benefits from the belief norm and that it should be counted among those that sustain the (...)
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  7. On Ethics Institute Activism in advance.Michael Burroughs - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
  8. Demonstrating Ethical Leadership in a Virtual World: Accessibility, Community, and Identity.Nate Olson & Kallee McCullough - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
    During the COVID-19 pandemic, ethics centers were forced to reimagine program delivery. In a tumultuous time with rampant social isolation, the need for ethics education and dialogue was also critical. The authors, members of the directorship team of the Kegley Institute of Ethics, discuss how KIE met these challenges through organizing over fifty online events during the pandemic, including webinars, pedagogy workshops, ethics bowls, intercollegiate student conversations, colloquia, film viewings, and podcasts. The article describes both the opportunities and challenges that (...)
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  9. Ethics Centers’ Conflicts of Interest and the Failure of Disclosure to Remedy this Endemic Problem in advance.Lisa S. Parker - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
  10. Ethics Dumping : Case Studies from Global North and South Research Collaborations. [REVIEW]David Appiah, Doreen Teye-Adjei & Christian Auagah - 2024 - Ethics: Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol. 2, Issue 1, Jan.- Feb 2024Www.Researchethics.In.
    Ethics dumping is an ongoing practice in collaborative research. Despite the existence of ethical review boards, some notable discrepancy in governance and integration persists. This paper is a chronological book review of a 15-chapter book titled, "Ethics Dumping: Case Studies from North-South Research Collaborations," compiled from individual authors and edited by Schroeder, Cook, Hirch, Fenet, and Muthuswami in 2018. This book review aims to ensure ever-increasing attention to the numerous ways of ethics dumping and incite further research into the matter. (...)
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  11. “It takes a village to write a really good paper”: A normative framework for peer reviewing in philosophy.Samantha Copeland & Lavinia Marin - 2024 - Metaphilosophy 55 (2):131-146.
    That there is a “crisis of peer review” at the moment is not in dispute, but sufficient attention has not yet been paid to the normative potential that lies in current calls for reform. In contrast to approaches to “fixing” the problems in peer review, which tend to maintain the status quo in terms of professionalising opportunities, this paper addresses the needs of philosophers and how peer‐review reform can be an opportunity to improve the academic discipline of philosophy, whereby progress (...)
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  12. Gain-of-function research and model organisms in biology.Nicholas G. Evans & Charles H. Pence - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (3):201-206.
    So-called ‘gain-of-function’ (GOF) research is virological research that results in a virus substantially more virulent or transmissible than its wild antecedent. GOF research has been subject to ethical analysis in the past, but the methods of GOF research have to date been underexamined by philosophers in these analyses. Here, we examine the typical animal used in influenza GOF experiments, the ferret, and show how despite its longstanding use, it does not easily satisfy the desirable criteria for ananimal model. We then (...)
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  13. An African Research Ethics Reader.Ike Iyioke (ed.) - 2024 - Brill.
    Afro-cultural research ethics is in a nascent phase within the field of research ethics as a whole and requires more attention and in-depth articulation. With specific case studies, this vital volume provides unique perspectives on topics such as social autonomy vis-a-vis interests of individuals.
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  14. Ancillary Care Obligations in the Light of an African Bioethic: From Entrustment to Communion (Repr.).Thaddeus Metz - 2024 - In Ike Iyioke (ed.), An African Research Ethics Reader. Brill.
    Reprint of an article that first appeared in Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics (2017).
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  15. (When) Are Authors Culpable for Causing Harm?Marcus Arvan - 2023 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 20 (1-2):47-78.
    To what extent are authors morally culpable for harms caused by their published work? Can authors be culpable even if their ideas are misused, perhaps because they failed to take precautions to prevent harmful misinterpretations? Might authors be culpable even if they do take precautions—if, for example, they publish ideas that others can be reasonably expected to put to harmful uses, precautions notwithstanding? Although complete answers to these questions depend upon controversial views about the right to free speech, this paper (...)
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  16. Reframing data ethics in research methods education: a pathway to critical data literacy.Javiera Atenas, Leo Havemann & Cristian Timmermann - 2023 - International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education 20:11.
    This paper presents an ethical framework designed to support the development of critical data literacy for research methods courses and data training programmes in higher education. The framework we present draws upon our reviews of literature, course syllabi and existing frameworks on data ethics. For this research we reviewed 250 research methods syllabi from across the disciplines, as well as 80 syllabi from data science programmes to understand how or if data ethics was taught. We also reviewed 12 data ethics (...)
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  17. Defusing the legal and ethical minefield of epigenetic applications in the military, defence and security context.Gratien Dalpe, Katherine Huerne, Charles Dupras, Katherine Cheung, Nicole Palmour, Eva Winkler, Karla Alex, Maxwell Mehlmann, John W. Holloway, Eline Bunnik, Harald König, Isabelle M. Mansuy, Marianne G. Rots, Cheryl Erwin, Alexandre Erler, Emanuele Libertini & Yann Joly - 2023 - Journal of Law and the Biosciences 10 (2):1-32.
    Epigenetic research has brought several important technological achievements, including identifying epigenetic clocks and signatures, and developing epigenetic editing. The potential military applications of such technologies we discuss are stratifying soldiers’ health, exposure to trauma using epigenetic testing, information about biological clocks, confirming child soldiers’ minor status using epigenetic clocks, and inducing epigenetic modifications in soldiers. These uses could become a reality. This article presents a comprehensive literature review, and analysis by interdisciplinary experts of the scientific, legal, ethical, and societal issues (...)
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  18. Engaged Solidaristic Research: Developing Methodological and Normative Principles for Political Philosophers.Marie-Pier Lemay - 2023 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 9 (4).
    Reshaping our methodological research tools for adequately capturing injustice and domination has been a central aspiration of feminist philosophy and social epistemology in recent years. There has been an increasingly empirical turn in recent feminist and political theorization, engaging with case studies and the challenges arising from conducting research in solidarity with unequal partners. I argue that these challenges cannot be resolved by merely adopting a norm and stance of deference to those in the struggle for justice. To conduct philosophical (...)
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  19. What should recognition entail? Responding to the reification of autonomy and vulnerability in medical research.Jonathan Lewis & Soren Holm - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (7):491-492.
    Smajdor argues that “recognition” is the solution to the “reifying attitude” that results from “the urge to protect ‘vulnerable’ people through exclusion from research”. Drawing on theories of reification, we argue that it is the concepts of autonomy and vulnerability themselves that have been reified, resulting in the impoverishment of approaches to autonomy at law and in research ethics. Overcoming such reification demands a deeper consideration of the grounds on which vulnerable individuals are owed recognition and thereby the forms such (...)
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  20. Holding Large Language Models to Account.Ryan Miller - 2023 - In Berndt Müller (ed.), Proceedings of the AISB Convention. Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and the Simulation of Behaviour. pp. 7-14.
    If Large Language Models can make real scientific contributions, then they can genuinely use language, be systematically wrong, and be held responsible for their errors. AI models which can make scientific contributions thereby meet the criteria for scientific authorship.
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  21. Citizen science and credit.Sandin Per & Baard Patrik - 2023 - In Eaton Sarah Elaine (ed.), Handbook of Academic Integrity. Springer.
    Science is supposedly meritocratic, and this means that it is important for scientists to be familiar with the mechanisms of how credit, for instance, in the form of authorship, acknowledgments, or awards, is bestowed. In citizen science – research activities in which volunteers are actively involved and where the research project and its success rely on those volunteer contributions – there are less clear guidelines and practices for awarding and valuing credit. This chapter introduces different forms of citizen science, disentangles (...)
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  22. Handbook of Academic Integrity.Eaton Sarah Elaine (ed.) - 2023 - Springer.
    The book brings together diverse views from around the world and provides a comprehensive overview of academic integrity and how to create the ethical academy. At the same time, the Handbook does not shy away from some of the vigorous debates in the field such as the causes of academic integrity breaches. There has been an explosion of interest in academic integrity in the last 20-30 years. New technologies that have made it easier than ever for students to ‘cut and (...)
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  23. Principlism and citizen science: the possibilities and limitations of principlism for guiding responsible citizen science conduct.Patrik Baard & Per Sandin - 2022 - Research Ethics 1 (4):174701612211165.
    Citizen science (CS) has been presented as a novel form of research relevant for social concerns and global challenges. CS transforms the roles of participants to being actively involved at various stages of research processes, CS projects are dynamic, and pluralism arises when many non-professional researchers take an active involvement in research. Some argue that these elements all make existing research ethical principles and regulations ill-suited for guiding responsible CS conduct. However, while many have sought to highlight such challenges from (...)
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  24. Waving away waivers: an obligation to contribute to ‘herd knowledge’ for data linkage research?Owen M. Bradfield - 2022 - Research Ethics 18 (2):151-162.
    In today’s online data-driven world, people constantly shed data and deposit digital footprints. When individuals access health services, governments and health providers collect and store large volumes of health information about people that can later be retrieved, linked and analysed for research purposes. This can lead to new discoveries in medicine and healthcare. In addition, when securely stored and de-identified, the privacy risks are minimal and manageable. In many jurisdictions, ethics committees routinely waive the requirement for researchers to obtain consent (...)
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  25. Race and Gender in Reserch.Christopher ChoGlueck & Elisabeth A. Lloyd - 2022 - In Ezio Di Nucci, Ji-Young Lee & Isaac A. Wagner (eds.), The Rowman & Littlefield Handbook of Bioethics. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This chapter explores two of the most studied and most damaging aspects of such societal influence on science: racial and gender biases. We discuss two major domains of biological and medical research involving race and gender: cognitive differences research and reproductive health science. In each case, we explore the influence of sexist values like androcentric bias—where researchers focus on men and male bodies as the alleged “norm”—and racist values like white supremacy—where researchers privilege the cultures and attributes of white people (...)
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  26. Personalising the dilemma: research ethics in fiction.Sally Dalton-Brown - 2022 - Research Ethics 18 (2):114-125.
    Learning about research ethics and research integrity is greatly facilitated by case studies, which illuminate, ground and personalise abstract questions. This paper argues that fiction can provide similar learning experiences, incarnating ethical dilemmas through a medium that is highly accessible yet sophisticated in its depictions of how researchers behave. Examples of fictional illustrations are given to illustrate various themes such as animal experimentation, exploitation of the vulnerable, researcher bias and research fraud.
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  27. Sins of Inquiry: How to Criticize Scientific Pursuits.Marina DiMarco & Kareem Khalifa - 2022 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 92 (C):86-96.
    Criticism is a staple of the scientific enterprise and of the social epistemology of science. Philosophical discussions of criticism have traditionally focused on its roles in relation to objectivity, confirmation, and theory choice. However, attention to criticism and to criticizability should also inform our thinking about scientific pursuits: the allocation of resources with the aim of developing scientific tools and ideas. In this paper, we offer an account of scientific pursuitworthiness which takes criticizability as its starting point. We call this (...)
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  28. Haben Patient*innen die moralische Pflicht, ihre klinischen Daten für Forschung bereitzustellen? Eine kritische Prüfung möglicher Gründe.Martin Jungkunz, Anja Köngeter, Katja Mehlis, Markus Spitz, Eva C. Winkler & Christoph Schickhardt - 2022 - Ethik in der Medizin 34 (2):195-220.
    Die Sekundärnutzung klinischer Daten für Forschungs- und Lernaktivitäten hat das Potenzial, medizinisches Wissen und klinische Versorgung erheblich zu verbessern. Zur Realisierung dieses Potenzials bedarf es einer ethischen und rechtlichen Grundlage für die Datennutzung, vorzugsweise in Form der Einwilligung von Patient*innen. Damit stellt sich die grundsätzliche Frage: Haben Patient*innen eine moralische Pflicht, ihre klinischen Daten für Forschungs- und Lernaktivitäten zur Verfügung zu stellen?Auf Basis eines ethischen Ansatzes, der als „sorgender Liberalismus“ bezeichnet werden kann, werden folgende Argumente zur Begründung einer Pflicht von (...)
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  29. Reporting and discoverability of “Tweets” quoted in published scholarship: current practice and ethical implications.Shannon Mason & Lenandlar Singh - 2022 - Research Ethics 18 (2):93-113.
    Research Ethics, Volume 18, Issue 2, Page 93-113, April 2022. Twitter is an increasingly common source of rich, personalized qualitative data, as millions of people daily share their thoughts on myriad topics. However, questions remain unclear concerning if and how to quote publicly available social media data ethically. In this study, focusing on 136 education manuscripts quoting 2667 Tweets, we look to investigate the ways in which Tweets are quoted, the ethical discussions forwarded and actions taken, and the extent to (...)
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  30. Scientific journals must be alert to potential manipulation in citations and referencing.Mina Mehregan - 2022 - Sage Publications Ltd: Research Ethics 18 (2):163-168.
    Research Ethics, Volume 18, Issue 2, Page 163-168, April 2022. Citation is an essential practice in scientific publishing. However, it is mandatory that citing the sources in a scientific work is performed in a proper manner. Manipulating citations in research articles is one form of academic research misconduct that violates publication ethics. Citation manipulation simply occurs for the purpose of increasing the number of citations of a researcher or a journal. Unfortunately, there has been a growing trend for this type (...)
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  31. Hit by the Virtual Trolley: When is Experimental Ethics Unethical?Jon Rueda - 2022 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):7-27.
    The trolley problem is one of the liveliest research frameworks in experimental ethics. In the last decade, social neuroscience and experimental moral psychology have gone beyond the studies with mere text-based hypothetical moral dilemmas. In this article, I present the rationale behind testing the actual behaviour in more realistic scenarios through Virtual Reality and summarize the body of evidence raised by the experiments with virtual trolley scenarios. Then, I approach the argument of Ramirez and LaBarge (2020), who claim that the (...)
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  32. Ethical issues in multilingual research situations: a focus on interview-based research.Natalie Schembri & Alma Jahić Jašić - 2022 - Research Ethics 18 (3):210-225.
    Research Ethics, Volume 18, Issue 3, Page 210-225, July 2022. Interview-based research in multilingual situations can present researchers with specific ethical challenges relating to language-based power play, data handling and presentation. Studies indicate favouring the L1 as an interviewing language may produce better quality data, but external pressures can favour English as the dominant research language. This article examines researcher perceptions and experiences of the ethical consequences of language choice and the practical issues involved. Interviews were conducted with five European (...)
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  33. Reducing the Inadvertent Spread of Retracted Science: recommendations from the RISRS report.Jodi Schneider, Nathan D. Woods, Randi Proescholdt & The Risrs Team - 2022 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 7 (1).
    Background Retraction is a mechanism for alerting readers to unreliable material and other problems in the published scientific and scholarly record. Retracted publications generally remain visible and searchable, but the intention of retraction is to mark them as “removed” from the citable record of scholarship. However, in practice, some retracted articles continue to be treated by researchers and the public as valid content as they are often unaware of the retraction. Research over the past decade has identified a number of (...)
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  34. An Ethical Framework for Presenting Scientific Results to Policy-Makers.S. Andrew Schroeder - 2022 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 32 (1):33-67.
    Scientists have the ability to influence policy in important ways through how they present their results. Surprisingly, existing codes of scientific ethics have little to say about such choices. I propose that we can arrive at a set of ethical guidelines to govern scientists’ presentation of information to policymakers by looking to bioethics: roughly, just as a clinician should aim to promote informed decision-making by patients, a scientist should aim to promote informed decision-making by policymakers. Though this may sound like (...)
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  35. Thinking about Values in Science: Ethical versus Political Approaches.S. Andrew Schroeder - 2022 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 52 (3):246-255.
    Philosophers of science now broadly agree that doing good science involves making non-epistemic value judgments. I call attention to two very different normative standards which can be used to evaluate such judgments: standards grounded in ethics and standards grounded in political philosophy. Though this distinction has not previously been highlighted, I show that the values in science literature contain arguments of each type. I conclude by explaining why this distinction is important. Seeking to determine whether some value-laden determination meets substantive (...)
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  36. Ethical research landscapes in fragile and conflict-affected contexts: understanding the challenges.Kelsey Shanks & Julia Paulson - 2022 - Research Ethics 18 (3):169-192.
    As the prevalence of conflict and fragility continue to rise around the world, research is increasingly heralded as a solution. However, current ethical guidelines for working in areas suffering from institutional and social fragility, insecurity or violent conflict have been heavily critiqued as highly abstract; focussed only on data collection; detached from the realities of academia in the Global South; and potentially extractive. This article seeks to respond to that assessment by spotlighting some of the most prevalent challenges researchers face (...)
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  37. E-Cigarettes, the FDA, Public Health, and Harm Reduction: A Response to the Open Peer Commentaries.Larisa Svirsky, Dana Howard & Micah L. Berman - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (1):1-4.
    We appreciate that all our commentators accepted the central framework we argued for, namely that the FDA has multiple roles and attendant responsibilities, and we are excited to see this framework...
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  38. Experiences and practices of key research team members in obtaining informed consent for pharmacogenetic research among people living with HIV: a qualitative study.Nabukenya Sylvia, Ochieng Joseph, Kaawa-Mafigiri David, Munabi Ian, Nakigudde Janet, Nakwagala Frederick Nelson, Barugahare John, Kwagala Betty, Ibingira Charles, Twimwijukye Adelline, Sewankambo Nelson & Mwaka Erisa Sabakaki - 2022 - Research Ethics 18 (3):193-209.
    Research Ethics, Volume 18, Issue 3, Page 193-209, July 2022. This study aimed to explore experiences and practices of key research team members in obtaining informed consent for pharmacogenetics research and to identify the approaches used for enhancing understanding during the consenting process. Data collection involved 15 qualitative, in-depth interviews with key researchers who were involved in obtaining informed consent from HIV infected individuals in Uganda for participation in pharmacogenetic clinical trials. The study explored two prominent themes: approaches used to (...)
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  39. Informed Consent in Clinical Studies Involving Human Participants: Ethical Insights of Medical Researchers in Germany and Poland.Cristian Timmermann, Marcin Orzechowski, Oxana Kosenko, Katarzyna Woniak & Florian Steger - 2022 - Frontiers in Medicine 9:901059.
    Background: The internationalization of clinical studies requires a shared understanding of the fundamental ethical values guiding clinical studies. It is important that these values are not only embraced at the legal level but also adopted by clinicians themselves during clinical studies. Objective: Our goal is to provide an insight on how clinicians in Germany and Poland perceive and identify the different ethical issues regarding informed consent in clinical studies. Methods: To gain an understanding of how clinicians view clinical studies in (...)
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  40. Addressing the Continued Circulation of Retracted Research as a Design Problem.Nathan D. Woods, Jodi Schneider & The Risrs Team - 2022 - GW Journal of Ethics in Publishing 1 (1).
    In this article, we discuss the continued circulation and use of retracted science as a complex problem: Multiple stakeholders throughout the publishing ecosystem hold competing perceptions of this problem and its possible solutions. We describe how we used a participatory design process model to co-develop recommendations for addressing this problem with stakeholders in the Alfred P. Sloan-funded project, Reducing the Inadvertent Spread of Retracted Science (RISRS). After introducing the four core RISRS recommendations, we discuss how the issue of retraction-related stigma (...)
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  41. La conduite responsable en recherche en sciences humaines et sociales.Sihem Neila Abtroun, Marie-Alexia Masella, Marie-Alexandra Gagné & Bryn Williams-Jones - 2021 - In Christian Hervé & Michèle Stanton Jean (eds.), Ethique, intégrité scientifique et fausses nouvelles. pp. 121-134.
    Jusqu’à présent, les discussions au sein de la communauté universitaire et dans la littérature scientifique sur la conduite responsable en recherche (CRR), incluant l’intégrité scientifique et l’éthique de la recherche, ont principalement été menées par les chercheurs en sciences de la santé et en sciences fondamentales. Préoccupés, à juste titre, par des problèmes d’inconduite, leurs effets négatifs sur la rigueur scientifique et la confiance du public dans l’entreprise de la recherche, ces débats ont conduit à l’élaboration et à la mise (...)
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  42. A critical self-reflexive account of a privileged researcher in a complicated setting: Kakuma refugee camp.Neil Bilotta - 2021 - Research Ethics 17 (4):435-447.
    As a white, Western-educated man, undertaking research in Kakuma refugee camp, Kenya, I encountered ethical dilemmas related to my privileged racial and gender status. These include power imbalance...
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  43. Public Trust in Science: Exploring the Idiosyncrasy-Free Ideal.Marion Boulicault & S. Andrew Schroeder - 2021 - In Kevin Vallier & Michael Weber (eds.), Social Trust: Foundational and Philosophical Issues. Routledge.
    What makes science trustworthy to the public? This chapter examines one proposed answer: the trustworthiness of science is based at least in part on its independence from the idiosyncratic values, interests, and ideas of individual scientists. That is, science is trustworthy to the extent that following the scientific process would result in the same conclusions, regardless of the particular scientists involved. We analyze this "idiosyncrasy-free ideal" for science by looking at philosophical debates about inductive risk, focusing on two recent proposals (...)
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  44. What are the most common reasons for return of ethics submissions? An audit of an Australian health service ethics committee.Caitlin Brandenburg, Sarah Thorning & Carine Ruthenberg - 2021 - Research Ethics 17 (3):346-358.
    One of the key criticisms of the ethical review process is the time taken to decision, and associated resource use. A key source of delay is that most submissions are required to respond to at leas...
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  45. A phenomenographic study of scientists’ beliefs about the causes of scientists’ research misconduct.Aidan C. Cairns, Caleb Linville, Tyler Garcia, Bill Bridges, Scott Tanona, Jonathan Herington & James T. Laverty - 2021 - Research Ethics 17 (4):501-521.
    When scientists act unethically, their actions can cause harm to participants, undermine knowledge creation, and discredit the scientific community. Responsible Conduct of Research training i...
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  46. Ethical challenges in the COVID-19 research context: a toolkit for supporting analysis and resolution.Clara Calia, Corinne Reid, Cristóbal Guerra, Abdul-Gafar Oshodi, Charles Marley, Action Amos, Paulina Barrera & Liz Grant - 2021 - Ethics and Behavior 31 (1):60-75.
    COVID-19 is compromising all aspects of society, with devastating impacts on health, political, social, economic and educational spheres. A premium is being placed on scientific research as the source of possible solutions, with a situational imperative to carry out investigations at an accelerated rate. There is a major challenge not to neglect ethical standards, in a context where doing so may mean the difference between life and death. In this paper we offer a rubric for considering the ethical challenges in (...)
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  47. Preventing ethics dumping: the challenges for Kenyan research ethics committees.Kate Chatfield, Doris Schroeder, Anastasia Guantai, Kirana Bhatt, Elizabeth Bukusi, Joyce Adhiambo Odhiambo, Julie Cook & Joshua Kimani - 2021 - Research Ethics 17 (1):23-44.
    Ethics dumping is the practice of undertaking research in a low- or middle-income setting which would not be permitted, or would be severely restricted, in a high-income setting. Whilst Kenya operates a sophisticated research governance system, resource constraints and the relatively low number of accredited research ethics committees limit the capacity for ensuring ethical compliance. As a result, Kenya has been experiencing cases of ethics dumping. This article presents 11 challenges in the context of preventing ethics dumping in Kenya, namely (...)
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  48. Personalising the dilemma: research ethics in fiction.Sally Dalton-Brown - 2021 - Sage Publications Ltd: Research Ethics 18 (2):114-125.
    Research Ethics, Volume 18, Issue 2, Page 114-125, April 2022. Learning about research ethics and research integrity is greatly facilitated by case studies, which illuminate, ground and personalise abstract questions. This paper argues that fiction can provide similar learning experiences, incarnating ethical dilemmas through a medium that is highly accessible yet sophisticated in its depictions of how researchers behave. Examples of fictional illustrations are given to illustrate various themes such as animal experimentation, exploitation of the vulnerable, researcher bias and research (...)
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  49. Expert Communication and the Self-Defeating Codes of Scientific Ethics.Hugh Desmond - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (1):24-26.
    Codes of ethics currently offer no guidance to scientists acting in capacity of expert. Yet communicating their expertise is one of the most important activities of scientists. Here I argue that expert communication has a specifically ethical dimension, and that experts must face a fundamental trade-off between "actionability" and "transparency" when communicating. Some recommendations for expert communication are suggested.
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  50. Precision Medicine, Data, and the Anthropology of Social Status.Hugh Desmond - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (4):80-83.
    The success of precision medicine depends on obtaining large amounts of information about at-risk populations. However, getting consent is often difficult. Why? In this commentary I point to the differentials in social status involved. These differentials are inevitable once personal information is surrendered, but are particularly intense when the studied populations are socioeconomically or socioculturally disadvantaged and/or ethnically stigmatized groups. I suggest how the deep distrust of the latter groups can be partially justified as a lack of confidence that their (...)
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