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Summary The idea that science advances by a series of fundamental upheavals known as scientific revolutions was made famous by Thomas Kuhn in his book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.  A variety of philosophical questions arise in relation to this idea, including questions about relativism and the rationality of choice between theories, as well as issues to do with conceptual and meaning change in science.
Key works The key work in this area is Kuhn 1962, and later editions, e.g. Kuhn 1962
Introductions Nickles 2010; Bird 2018
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326 found
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1 — 50 / 326
  1. added 2020-05-25
    How is a Revolutionary Scientific Paper Cited?: The Case of Hess’ “History of Ocean Basins”.K. Brad Wray - forthcoming - Scientometrics.
    I examine the citation patterns to a revolutionary scientific paper, Hess’ “History of Ocean Basins”, which played a significant role in the plate tectonics revolution in the geosciences. I test two predictions made by the geoscientist Menard (in Science: growth and change. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1971): (1) that the peak year of citations for Hess’ article will be 1968; and (2) that the rate of citations to the article will then reach some lower level, continuing on accumulating citations at (...)
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  2. added 2020-03-11
    Creatively Undecided: Toward a History and Philosophy of Scientific Agency.Menachem Fisch - 2017 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  3. added 2020-03-10
    Reporting the Discovery of New Chemical Elements: Working in Different Worlds, Only 25 Years Apart.K. Brad Wray & Line Edslev Andersen - forthcoming - Foundations of Chemistry:1-10.
    In his account of scientific revolutions, Thomas Kuhn suggests that after a revolutionary change of theory, it is as if scientists are working in a different world. In this paper, we aim to show that the notion of world change is insightful. We contrast the reporting of the discovery of neon in 1898 with the discovery of hafnium in 1923. The one discovery was made when elements were identified by their atomic weight; the other discovery was made after scientists came (...)
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  4. added 2020-02-11
    Discipline and Experience: The Mathematical Way in the Scientific Revolution.Marjorie Grene - 1997 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (1):113-116.
  5. added 2020-02-11
    Beauty and Revolution in Science. [REVIEW]Katherine Hawley - 1997 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (2):297-299.
    Review of Beauty and Revolution in Science, by JW McAllister.
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  6. added 2020-02-11
    Reason, Experiment and Mysticism in the Scientific Revolution.Ernan McMullin - 1978 - Philosophy of Science 45 (2):329-330.
  7. added 2020-01-13
    Kuhn's Incommensurability Thesis: Good Examples Still to Be Found.Dusko Prelevic - 2019 - Filozofia Nauki (The Philosophy of Science) 27 (4):61-77.
    In The Structure of Scientific Revolutions,Thomas Kuhn famously argued that scientific revolutions consist in paradigm shifts in which the superseded and the new paradigms are incommensurable. My aim in this paper is to show that neither Kuhn’s examples nor Yafeng Shan’s recently proposed example adequately support this incommensurability thesis. Starting from the distinction between global and local incommensurability, I argue that, on the one hand, local incommensurability does not imply that paradigms are globally incommensurable, and, on the other, that it (...)
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  8. added 2020-01-03
    The Interdisciplinarity Revolution.Vincenzo Politi - 2019 - Theoria. An International Journal for Theory, History and Foundations of Science 34 (2):237.
    Contemporary interdisciplinary research is often described as bringing some important changes in the structure and aims of the scientific enterprise. Sometimes, it is even characterized as a sort of Kuhnian scientific revolution. In this paper, the analogy between interdisciplinarity and scientific revolutions will be analysed. It will be suggested that the way in which interdisciplinarity is promoted looks similar to how new paradigms were described and defended in some episodes of revolutionary scientific change. However, contrary to what happens during some (...)
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  9. added 2019-11-22
    The Kuhnian Image of Science: Time for a Decisive Transformation?: Edited by Moti Mizrahi, Lanham, MD, Rowman and Littlefield, 2018, Vi + 224 Pp., ISBN 9781786603401, US$120.00, £80.00. [REVIEW]Massimiliano Simons - 2019 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 32 (1):78-80.
    Review of the book "The Kuhnian Image of Science'.
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  10. added 2019-10-23
    Between History and Philosophy of Science: The Relationship Between Kuhn’s Black-Body Theory and Structure.Adam Timmins - 2019 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 9 (2):371-387.
  11. added 2019-10-06
    Elliptical Orbits and the Aristotelian Scientific Revolution.James Franklin - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (2):69-79.
    The Scientific Revolution was far from the anti-Aristotelian movement traditionally pictured. Its applied mathematics pursued by new means the Aristotelian ideal of science as knowledge by insight into necessary causes. Newton’s derivation of Kepler’s elliptical planetary orbits from the inverse square law of gravity is a central example.
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  12. added 2019-10-02
    Seized by the Spirit of Modern Science. [REVIEW]Stephen Gaukroger, John Schuster, Alan Taylor & James Franklin - 1997 - Metascience 6 (1):1-28.
    Reviews of Peter Dear's Discipline and Experience: The Mathematical Way in the Scientific Revolution.
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  13. added 2019-09-13
    Early Modern Mathematical Principles and Symmetry Arguments.James Franklin - 2017 - In The Idea of Principles in Early Modern Thought Interdisciplinary Perspectives. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 16-44.
    The leaders of the Scientific Revolution were not Baconian in temperament, in trying to build up theories from data. Their project was that same as in Aristotle's Posterior Analytics: they hoped to find necessary principles that would show why the observations must be as they are. Their use of mathematics to do so expanded the Aristotelian project beyond the qualitative methods used by Aristotle and the scholastics. In many cases they succeeded.
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  14. added 2019-09-13
    Diagrammatic Reasoning and Modelling in the Imagination: The Secret Weapons of the Scientific Revolution.James Franklin - 2000 - In Guy Freeland & Anthony Corones (eds.), 1543 and All That: Image and Word, Change and Continuity in the Proto-Scientific Revolution. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Just before the Scientific Revolution, there was a "Mathematical Revolution", heavily based on geometrical and machine diagrams. The "faculty of imagination" (now called scientific visualization) was developed to allow 3D understanding of planetary motion, human anatomy and the workings of machines. 1543 saw the publication of the heavily geometrical work of Copernicus and Vesalius, as well as the first Italian translation of Euclid.
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  15. added 2019-07-14
    Por Que as Revoluções Científicas Não Destroem os Objetos Técnicos?Daniel Durante Pereira Alves - 2013 - Filosofia Contemporânea: Lógica, Linguagem E Ciência.
    Parece um fato bastante trivial que quando uma teoria científica se torna obsoleta, por ter sido substituída por outra, isto não tem nenhuma consequência para os objetos técnicos compatíveis com a teoria antiga. Pretendo, neste ensaio, responder à questão bem menos óbvia de por que isto se dá. Como subproduto, apresento uma defesa da teoria da ciência de Thomas Kuhn. Para tanto, inicio mostrando como a teoria de Kuhn foi motivada por considerações sobre a história da ciência. Em seguida, defendo (...)
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  16. added 2019-06-22
    Equivalence of Hypotheses and Galilean Censure in Leibniz: A Conspiracy or a Way to Moderate Censure?Laurynas Adomaitis - 2019 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 72 (1):63-85.
    Spending six months in Rome in 1689 Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646–1716) occupied himself with the question of Copernican and Galilean censure. An established reading of the Rome papers suggests that Leibniz’s attempt to have the Copernican censure lifted was derived solely from the equivalence of hypotheses stemming from the relativity of motion; and involved Leibniz’s compromising his belief in the truth of the Copernican hypothesis by arguing that it should only be interpreted instrumentally; and that Leibniz believed in the unrestricted (...)
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  17. added 2019-06-17
    Paradigms.Daniel Goldman Cedarbaum - 1983 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 14 (3):173.
  18. added 2019-06-06
    The Phenomenon of Transdisciplinary Cognitive Revolution.V. A. Bazhanov & A. G. Kraeva - 2016 - Liberal Arts in Russiaроссийский Гуманитарный Журналrossijskij Gumanitarnyj Žurnalrossijskij Gumanitarnyj Zhurnalrossiiskii Gumanitarnyi Zhurnal 5 (2):91.
    Phenomenon of transdisciplinarity was put into the fore of analysis rather recently. In the article an attempt is made to find out whether it is possible to attribute this phenomenon not only to a science of the 21st century, or we have here the case where some scientific realities come to the attention of researchers with certain delay and has its value for the culture in general? It is possible to judge even the emergence of a kind of cognitive revolution (...)
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  19. added 2019-06-06
    Kuhn’s Structure of Scientific Revolutions Between Sociology and Epistemology.Ladislav Kvasz - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 46:78-84.
    The aim of the paper is to clarify Kuhn’s theory of scientific revolutions. We propose to discriminate between a scientific revolution, which is a sociological event of a change of attitude of the scientific community with respect to a particular theory, and an epistemic rupture, which is a linguistic fact consisting of a discontinuity in the linguistic framework in which this theory is formulated. We propose a classification of epistemic ruptures into four types. In the paper, each of these types (...)
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  20. added 2019-06-06
    Volker Remmert, Picturing the Scientific Revolution. Philadelphia: St Joseph's University Press, 2011. Pp. 295. ISBN 978-0-916101-67-1. $65.00. [REVIEW]N. Kaoukji - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Science 45 (2):288-290.
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  21. added 2019-06-06
    Deborah E. Harkness, The Jewel House: Elizabethan London and the Scientific Revolution. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007. Pp. Xviii+349. ISBN 978-0-300-11196-5. £19.99. [REVIEW]Sophie Weeks - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Science 42 (1):133.
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  22. added 2019-06-06
    The Cognitive Structure of Scientific Revolutions. [REVIEW]Juan V. Mayoral de Lucas - 2009 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 24 (3):355-357.
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  23. added 2019-06-06
    Hanne Andersen, Peter Barker and Xiang Chen, The Cognitive Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Pp. Xvii+199. ISBN 978-0-521-85575-4. £45.00. [REVIEW]P. Stanford - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Science 41 (1):116-117.
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  24. added 2019-06-06
    PAMELA H. SMITH, The Body of the Artisan: Art and Experience in the Scientific Revolution. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2004. Pp. X+367. ISBN 0-26-76399-4. £24.50, $35.00. [REVIEW]John Henry - 2006 - British Journal for the History of Science 39 (4):607-609.
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  25. added 2019-06-06
    Les Grandes Révolutions Scientifiques du XXe Siècle. [REVIEW]Louis Marchildon - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (1):212-213.
    Le siècle qui s'achève est celui de la science et de la technologie. Et plus que tout autre sans doute, il a donné lieu à une importante réflexion philosophique sur la nature de la science, ses méthodes et ses prétentions à la vérité. La pratique scientifique, par ailleurs, est devenue hyperspécialisée et elle utilise souvent un langage incompréhensible aux non-initiés. Le livre de Daniel Parrochia tente d'abord de «contribuer à combler une partie de l'hiatus existant entre les hommes de ce (...)
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  26. added 2019-06-06
    David C. Lindberg and Robert S. Westman , Reappraisals of the Scientific Revolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990. Pp. Xxvii + 551. ISBN 0-521-34804-8. £14.95. [REVIEW]Stephen Pumfrey - 1994 - British Journal for the History of Science 27 (2):226-228.
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  27. added 2019-06-06
    John A. Stewart. Drifting Continents and Colliding Paradigms: Perspectives on the Geoscience Revolution. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1990. Pp. Xiv + 285. ISBN 0-253-35405-6. $35.00. [REVIEW]Homer Le Grand - 1991 - British Journal for the History of Science 24 (3):394-396.
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  28. added 2019-06-06
    History of Mathematical Sciences A. Rupert Hall, The Revolution in Science, 1500–1750. London: Longman, 1983, Pp. Viii + 373. ISBN 0-582-49133-9. £8.95. [REVIEW]John Hendry - 1984 - British Journal for the History of Science 17 (2):233-233.
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  29. added 2019-06-06
    Review of Thomas S. Kuhn The Essential Tension: Selected Studies in Scientific Tradition and Change. [REVIEW]David Zaret - 1981 - Philosophical Review 90 (1):146.
    Review of T. S. Kuhn's The Essential Tension.
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  30. added 2019-06-06
    Scientific Revolution Hermeticism and the Scientific Revolution. Papers Read at a Clark Library Seminar, 9 March 1974. By Robert S. Westman and J. E. McGuire. Los Angeles: William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, 1977. Pp. Iv + 150. No Price Stated. [REVIEW]P. B. Wood - 1980 - British Journal for the History of Science 13 (1):70-72.
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  31. added 2019-06-06
    Renaissance Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres. A New Translation From the Latin, with an Introduction and Notes by A. M. Duncan. Newton Abbot: David & Charles; New York: Barnes & Noble, 1976. Pp. 328. £12.50. [REVIEW]John Russell - 1979 - British Journal for the History of Science 12 (1):94-95.
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  32. added 2019-06-06
    Geology History of the Earth Sciences During the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions. By D. H. Hall. Amsterdam, Oxford, & New York: Elsevier, 1976. Pp. Xi + 297. $19.25. [REVIEW]Michael Neve - 1978 - British Journal for the History of Science 11 (1):68-69.
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  33. added 2019-06-06
    Reason, Experiment, and Mysticism in the Scientific Revolution. [REVIEW]A. W. W. - 1975 - Review of Metaphysics 29 (2):354-356.
    Ever since Herbert Butterfield’s lectures at Cambridge in 1948, the period known as the "Scientific Revolution" has intrigued historians and has gradually come to challenge the "Renaissance" as a significant marker in the periodization of intellectual history. This phenomenon has generated great interest among historians of science, but because the earlier practitioners of this discipline thought largely in terms of a positivist philosophy of science, it also tended to restrict the scope of studies concerning the origins of the "new science." (...)
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  34. added 2019-06-05
    What Can Cognitive Science Tell Us About Scientific Revolutions?Alexander Bird - 2012 - Theoria : An International Journal for Theory, History and Fundations of Science 27 (3):293-321.
    Kuhn’s Structure of Scientific Revolutions is notable for the readiness with which it drew on the results of cognitive psychology. These naturalistic elements were not well received and Kuhn did not subsequently develop them in his pub- lished work. Nonetheless, in a philosophical climate more receptive to naturalism, we are able to give a more positive evaluation of Kuhn’s proposals. Recently, philosophers such as Nersessian, Nickles, Andersen, Barker, and Chen have used the results of work on case-based reasoning, analogical thinking, (...)
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  35. added 2019-06-05
    Intermediate Causes and Explanations: The Key to Understanding the Scientific Revolution.Alan Chalmers - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (4):551-562.
    It is instructive to view the scientific revolution from the point of view of Robert Boyle’s distinction between intermediate and ultimate causes. From this point of view, the scientific revolution involved the identification of intermediate causes and their investigation by way of experiment as opposed to the specification of ultimate causes of the kind involved in the corpuscular matter theories of the mechanical philosophers. The merits of this point of view are explored in this paper by focussing on the hydrostatics (...)
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  36. added 2019-06-05
    Multiple Beginnings: New Insights on the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment in France.Judith P. Zinsser - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):245-249.
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  37. added 2019-06-05
    A Different Kind Of Revolutionary Change: Transformation From Object to Process Concepts.Xiang Chen - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (2):182-191.
    I propose a new perspective with which to understand scientific revolutions. This is a conversion from an object-only perspective to one that properly treats object and process concepts as distinct kinds. I begin with a re-examination of the Copernican revolution. Recent findings from the history of astronomy suggest that the Copernican revolution was a move from a conceptual framework built around an object concept to one built around a process concept. Drawing from studies in the cognitive sciences, I then show (...)
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  38. added 2019-06-05
    Wonder in the Face of Scientific Revolutions: Adam Smith on Newton's ‘Proof’ of Copernicanism 1.Eric Schliesser - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (4):697.
    (2005). Wonder in the face of scientific revolutions: Adam Smith on Newton's ‘Proof’ of Copernicanism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 13, No. 4, pp. 697-732. doi: 10.1080/09608780500293042.
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  39. added 2019-06-05
    Kuhn’s Missed Opportunity and the Multifaceted Lives of Bachelard: Mythical, Institutional, Historical, Philosophical, Literary, Scientific.Teresa Castelão-Lawless - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (4):873-881.
  40. added 2019-06-05
    Why Did Kuhn’s Structure of Scientific Revolutions Cause a Fuss?Brendan Larvor - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (2):369-390.
    After the publication of The structure of scientific revolutions, Kuhn attempted to fend off accusations of extremism by explaining that his allegedly “relativist” theory is little more than the mundane analytical apparatus common to most historians. The appearance of radicalism is due to the novelty of applying this machinery to the history of science. This defence fails, but it provides an important clue. The claim of this paper is that Kuhn inadvertently allowed features of his procedure and experience as an (...)
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  41. added 2019-06-05
    Review of Discipline and Experience: The Mathematical Way in the Scientific Revolution by Peter Dear. [REVIEW]Lorraine Daston - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (3):519-521.
  42. added 2019-06-05
    Towards a New Framework for Revolutions in Science.Wenceslao J. González - 1996 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (4):607-625.
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  43. added 2019-06-05
    ‘Revolution in Permanence’: Popper on Theory-Change in Science.John Worrall - 1995 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 39:75-102.
    Science, and in particular the process of theory-change in science, formed the major inspiration for Karl Popper's whole philosophy. Popper learned about the success of Einstein's revolutionary new theory in 1919, and Einstein ‘became a dominant influence on my thinking—in the long run perhaps the most important influence of all.’ Popper explained why: In May, 1919, Einstein's eclipse predictions were successfully tested by two British expeditions. With these tests a new theory of gravitation and a new cosmology suddenly appeared, not (...)
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  44. added 2019-06-05
    Kuhnian Issues, Scientific Revolutions and the History of Mathematics.Leo Corry - 1993 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 24 (1):95-117.
  45. added 2019-06-05
    Protestantism, Natural Philosophy, and the Scientific Revolution.Ole Peter Grell - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (3):519-527.
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  46. added 2019-06-05
    The Role of Comets in The Copernican Revolution.Peter Barker - 1988 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 19 (3):299.
  47. added 2019-06-05
    William Whewell's Conception of Scientific Revolutions.Frits Schipper - 1987 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 19 (1):43.
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  48. added 2019-06-05
    The Atomisation of Motion: A Facet of the Scientific Revolution.A. G. Molland - 1982 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 13 (1):31.
  49. added 2019-06-05
    Quantum Gravity and the Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Jürgen Audretsch - 1981 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 12 (2):322-339.
    Summary In a case study Kuhn's morphology of scientific revolutions is put to the test in confronting it with the contemporary developments in physics. It is shown in detail, that Kuhn's scheme is not compatible with the situation in physics today.
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  50. added 2019-06-05
    Revolutions in a Revolution.József Illy - 1981 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 12 (3):175.
1 — 50 / 326