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Sensory Modalities

Edited by Casey O'Callaghan (Washington University in St. Louis)
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  1. Morton A. Heller (ed.) (2000). Touch, Representation, and Blindness. Oxford University Press UK.
    Psychological studies of touch and blindness have been fraught with controversy. Within this field there remains an important theoretical divide. Many researchers have taken a cognitive approach to the study of touch and blindness, relating these to higher order processes, such as memory and concept formation. Others adopt a theoretical perspective, arguing that it not necessary to consider the 'internal representation' of the stimuli, when investigating touch - thus people make use of information from the physical biomechanical properties of their (...)
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  2. R. I. Aaron (1939). Two Senses of the Word Universal. Mind 48 (190):168-185.
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  3. Denise A. Atwood (2008). To Hold Her Hand. Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 10 (1):12-16.
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  4. Johanna C. Badcock (2016). A Neuropsychological Approach to Auditory Verbal Hallucinations and Thought Insertion - Grounded in Normal Voice Perception. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (3):631-652.
    A neuropsychological perspective on auditory verbal hallucinations links key phenomenological features of the experience, such as voice location and identity, to functionally separable pathways in normal human audition. Although this auditory processing stream framework has proven valuable for integrating research on phenomenology with cognitive and neural accounts of hallucinatory experiences, it has not yet been applied to other symptoms presumed to be closely related to AVH – such as thought insertion. In this paper, I propose that an APS framework offers (...)
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  5. Clare Batty (2010). A Representational Account of Olfactory Experience. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):511-538.
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  6. Josiane Bertoncini, Ranka Bijeljac-Babic, Peter W. Jusczyk, Lori J. Kennedy & Jacques Mehler (1988). An Investigation of Young Infants' Perceptual Representations of Speech Sounds. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 117 (1):21-33.
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  7. W. E. Black & E. G. H. Weeks (1927). Some Psycho-Physical Tests on Deaf, Dumb and Blind Subjects. Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 5 (4):296-302.
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  8. Gernot Böhme (2014). The Voice in Bodily Space. Dialogue and Universalism 24 (4):54-61.
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  9. Ray Boisvert (2001). Philosophy Regains Its Senses. Philosophy Now 31:9-11.
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  10. W. O. Brigstocke (1925). VI.—Pickwickian Senses. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 25 (1):107-118.
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  11. Sylvia Brownrigg (1999). The Metaphysical Touch.
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  12. Octavian Alexandru Busuioc, Returning To Our Senses.
    Thesis (Master, Philosophy) -- Queen's University, 2007-09-21 10:53:33.232.
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  13. F. Candlin (2004). Hands Off! Don't Touch: Art, Artefacts, Contamination and Blindness. Body and Society 10 (1):37-69.
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  14. Fiona Candlin (2004). Don't Touch! Hands Off! Art, Blindness and the Conservation of Expertise. Body and Society 10 (1):71-90.
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  15. Felipe Carvalho (forthcoming). Olfactory Objects. Disputatio.
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  16. Roberto Casati & Jérôme Dokic (2009). Some Varieties of Spatial Hearing. In Matthew Nudds & Casey O'Callaghan (eds.), Sounds and Perception: New Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.
    We provide some meta-theoretical constraints for the evaluation of a-spatial theories of sounds and auditory perception. We point out some forms of spatial content auditory experience can have. If auditory experience does not necessarily have a rich egocentric spatial content, it must have some spatial content for the relevant mode of perception to be recognizably auditory. An auditory experience devoid of any spatial content, if the notion makes sense at all, would be very different from the auditory experiences we actually (...)
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  17. Dan Cavedon-Taylor (2015). The First Sense: A Philosophical Study of Human Touch. Philosophical Quarterly 65 (261):833-838.
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  18. Arindam Chakrabarti (1992). I Touch What I Saw. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (1):103-116.
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  19. Carleton B. Christensen (2008). Chapter Five: Two Senses of Nature? In Self and World: From Analytic Philosophy to Phenomenology. Walter de Gruyter.
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  20. Ed Claparède (1900). Sur l'audition colorée. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 49:515 - 517.
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  21. J. W. Clark, J. W. Chen & K. E. Kürten (1989). Analog Simulation of Circuits in the Olfactory Bulb. In Rodney M. J. Cotterill (ed.), Models of Brain Function. Cambridge University Press. pp. 327--347.
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  22. Constance Classen (1992). The Odor of the Other: Olfactory Symbolism and Cultural Categories. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 20 (2):133-166.
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  23. W. C. Clement (1955). Seeing and Hearing. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 6 (21):61-63.
  24. James Cleve (2006). Touch, Sound, and Things Without the Mind. Metaphilosophy 37 (2):162-182.
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  25. C. A. J. Coady (1981). MORGAN, M. J., "Molyneux's Question - Vision, Touch and the Philosophy of Perception". [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 59:118.
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  26. Debra Cohen (2007). Touch and Intimacy in First World War Literature. [REVIEW] Clio 36:457-461.
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  27. Jonathan Cole (2016). Losing Touch: A Man Without His Body. Oxford University Press UK.
    What is like to live without touch or movement/position sense? The only way to understand the importance of these senses, so familiar we cannot imagine their absence, is to ask someone in that position. Ian Waterman lost them below the neck over forty years ago, though pain and temperature perception and his peripheral movement nerves were unaffected. Without proprioceptive feedback and touch the movement brain was disabled. Completely unable to move, he felt disembodied and frightened. Then, slowly, he taught himself (...)
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  28. A. J. Cooper (1978). Neonatal Olfactory Bulb Lesions: Influences on Subsequent Sexual Behavior of Male Mice. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 11 (1):53-56.
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  29. Anthony Cooper (1974). Effects of Accessory Olfactory Bulb Lesions on the Sexual Behavior of Male Mice. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 4 (4):419-420.
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  30. Anthony Cooper & Patrick J. Capretta (1976). Olfactory Bulb Removal and Taste Aversion Learning in Mice. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (3):235-236.
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  31. Anthony Cooper & Suzette Hathorn (1977). Modification of Flavor Preference by Olfactory Preexposure in Normal and Zinc-Sulfatetreated Mice. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (5):369-370.
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  32. Coulehan Jack (2001). May I Touch You? Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (3):209-221.
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  33. J. J. Cowley & A. J. Cooper (1977). The Effects of Olfactory Bulb Lesions on the Maternal Behavior of the Mouse. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 9 (1):55-57.
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  34. Jw Roxbee Cox (2011). Distinguishing the Senses. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Mind. Oxford University Press. pp. 530-550.
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  35. Pamela Dalton (2002). Olfaction. In J. Wixted & H. Pashler (eds.), Stevens' Handbook of Experimental Psychology. Wiley.
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  36. Silvia Dapiá & Guillermo Gregorio (1997). Throwing Sound Into Sounds. Semiotics:87-94.
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  37. M. Daubresse (1900). L'audition colorée. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 49:300 - 305.
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  38. D. R. Davies (1964). Human Senses and Perception. Philosophical Books 5 (2):30-31.
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  39. Ralph Marchant Davis (1967). Some Philosophic Problems of the Sense of Touch. Dissertation, University of Oregon
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  40. Frédérique De Vignemont & Olivier Massin (2013). Touch. The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception.
    Since Aristotle, touch has been found especially hard to define. One of the few unchallenged intuitions about touch, however, is that tactile awareness entertains some close relationship with bodily awareness. This chapter considers the relation between touch and bodily awareness from two different perspectives: the body template theory and the body map theory. According to the former, touch is defined by the fact that tactile content matches proprioceptive content. We raise some objections against such a bodily definition of touch and (...)
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  41. Denis Diderot & Fernando Bollino (1984). Lettera Sui Sordi E Muti.
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  42. F. L. Dimmick & E. Gaylord (1934). The Dependence of Auditory Localization Upon Pitch. Journal of Experimental Psychology 17 (4):593.
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  43. Mladen Dolar (2008). Touching Ground. Filozofski Vestnik 2.
    The paper takes up the problem of tactility, the sense of touch, as a philosophical problem largely neglected by the philosophical tradition. It tries to show how touch immediately raises some basic philosphical concepts, the notion of inner/outer, subject/object, of difference, of the ways to conceive the limit, of appearance/the thing itself, the basic problem of counting (it takes two to touch), etc. It analyses the classical text on touching by Aristotle in De anima, trying to show how the notion (...)
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  44. F. B. Dresslar (1894). Studies in the Psychology of Touch. Philosophical Review 3:737.
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  45. Judith Semon Dubas, Marianne Heijkoop & Marcel A. G. Van Aken (2009). A Preliminary Investigation of Parent–Progeny Olfactory Recognition and Parental Investment. Human Nature 20 (1):80-92.
    The role of olfaction in kin recognition and parental investment is documented in many mammalian/vertebrate species. Research on humans, however, has only focused on whether parents are able to recognize their children by smell, not whether humans use these cues for investment decisions. Here we show that fathers exhibit more affection and attachment and fewer ignoring behaviors toward children whose smell they can identify than toward those whose smell they cannot recognize. Thus, olfaction might serve as a means for males (...)
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  46. Blake D. Dutton (2016). 10. Defense of the Senses. In Augustine and Academic Skepticism: A Philosophical Study. Cornell University Press. pp. 214-227.
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  47. Robert Edelberg (1961). The Relationship Between the Galvanic Skin Response, Vasoconstriction, and Tactile Sensitivity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 62 (2):187.
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  48. Editor Editor (1925). Comparison of Visual and Tactual Judgment. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 3:305.
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  49. H. Ehrsson (2009). Rubber Hand Illusion. In Bayne Tim, Cleeremans Axel & Wilken Patrick (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. Oxford University Press. pp. 531--573.
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  50. Brenda Eskenazi, William S. Cain & Karen Friend (1986). Exploration of Olfactory Aptitude. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (3):203-206.
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