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  1. Amniocentesis for Sex Selection.Holly Smith - manuscript
    in Ethics, Humanism, and Medicine, ed. Marc Basson (New York: Alan R. Liss, 1980), pp. 81-94.
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  2. Adorno, Marx, and Abstract Domination.Eli B. Lichtenstein - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    This article reconstructs and defends Theodor Adorno’s social theory by motivating the central role of abstract domination within it. Whereas critics such as Axel Honneth have charged Adorno with adhering to a reductive model of personal domination, I argue that the latter rather understands domination as a structural and de-individualized feature of capitalist society. If Adorno’s social theory is to be explanatory, however, it must account for the source of the abstractions that dominate modern individuals and, in particular, that of (...)
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  3. The Flesh of Negation: Adorno and Merleau-Ponty Contra Heidegger.Daniel Neofetou - forthcoming - Sage Publications Ltd: Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print. Theodor Adorno’s 1960–1961 lecture course Ontology and Dialectics, recently translated into English, provides the most systematic articulation of his critique of Martin Heidegger. When Adorno delivered three of the lectures at the Collège de France, Maurice Merleau-Ponty was reportedly scandalised as he was at that time developing his own ontology, informed by Heidegger. However, this article problematises the assumption that Adorno’s negative dialectic and Merleau-Ponty’s late ontology are incompatible. First, Adorno’s criticism of Heidegger’s (...)
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  4. The Flesh of Negation: Adorno and Merleau-Ponty Contra Heidegger.Daniel Neofetou - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    Theodor Adorno’s 1960–1961 lecture course Ontology and Dialectics, recently translated into English, provides the most systematic articulation of his critique of Martin Heidegger. When Adorno deliv...
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  5. ‘To Conceal Domination in Production’: Horkheimer and Adorno’s Critical Functionalist Theory of Race.Andrew J. Pierce - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    This article revisits the Frankfurt School’s reflections on race, anti-Semitism and fascism, focusing especially on the theory of race implicit in Dialectic of Enlightenment. It argues that this th...
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  6. ‘To Conceal Domination in Production’: Horkheimer and Adorno’s Critical Functionalist Theory of Race.Andrew J. Pierce - forthcoming - Sage Publications Ltd: Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print. This article revisits the Frankfurt School’s reflections on race, anti-Semitism and fascism, focusing especially on the theory of race implicit in Dialectic of Enlightenment. It argues that this theory has the potential to be developed into a critical functionalist theory of race that avoids both class and race reductionism, offering a thoroughly intersectional competitor to currently dominant philosophies of race. The key to such a theory is the view that racialization plays a functional (...)
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  7. The Use of Sex Selection Reproductive Technology in Traditional African Societies: An Ethical Evaluation and a Case for Its Adaptation.Samuel Awuah-Nyamekye & Joseph Oppong - 2021 - In Beatrice Dedaa Okyere-Manu (ed.), African Values, Ethics, and Technology: Questions, Issues, and Approaches. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 217-228.
    Advancement in assisted reproductive technologies now gives society access to procreation that was never thought to be possible. These technologies can be employed to bring joy to couples in childless marriages but these raise several medical, legal as well as ethical questions that need much discussion and appraisal.Before the advent of these technologies, the traditional Akan society, for instance, had ways of dealing with childless marriages. These included traditional adoption and a ‘levirate’ practice. At the heart of the attempt to (...)
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  8. Changing the Subject: Philosophy From Socrates to Adorno, by Raymond Geuss. [REVIEW]Tricia Van Dyk - 2021 - Teaching Philosophy 44 (4):575-579.
  9. Benjamin, Adorno, and the Experience of Literature.Corey McCall & Nathan Ross - 2018 - Routledge.
    This collection features original essays that examine Walter Benjamin¿s and Theodor Adorno¿s essays and correspondence on literature. Taken together, the essays present the view that these two monumental figures of 20th-century philosophy were not simply philosophers who wrote about literature, but that they developed their philosophies in and through their encounters with literature. Benjamin, Adorno, and the Experience of Literature is divided into three thematic sections. The first section contains essays that directly demonstrate the ways in which literature enriched the (...)
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  10. The Frankfurt School: The Critical Theories of Max Horkheimer and Theodor W. Adorno.Horkheimer Max & W. Adorno Theodor - 2017 - Routledge.
    The Frankfurt School refers to a school of neo-Marxist interdisciplinary social theory particular established at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Frankfurt, Germany in 1923. Tarr's investigation focuses on three key issues. The first is the Frankfurt School's original program of providing a general theory of modern capitalist society. The second is the claim to represent a continuation of the original Marxian theory through the school's Critical Theory. The third is the scientific validity of Critical Theory in (...)
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  11. Sex, Lies and Gender.Irina Mikhalevich & Russell Powell - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (1):14-16.
    Browne 1 (this issue ) argues that what may appear to be a benevolent practice-disclosing the sex of a fetus to expecting parents who wish to know-is in fact an epistemically problematic and, as a result, ethically questionable medical practice. Browne worries that not only will the disclosure of fetal sex encourage sex-selective abortions (an issue we will not take up here), but also that it will convey a misleading and pernicious message about the relationship between sex and gender. More (...)
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  12. Subversive Seduction: Darwin, Sexual Selection, and the Spanish Novel. [REVIEW]Adriana Novoa - 2014 - Isis 105 (1):235-236.
  13. Sex Selection and the Procreative Liberty Framework.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2013 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (1):1-18.
    Although surprising to some proponents of sex selection for non-medical reasons (Dahl 2005), a considerable amount of critical debate has been raised by this practice (Blyth, Frith, and Crawshaw 2008; Dawson and Trounson 1996; Dickens 2002; Harris 2005; Heyd 2003; Holm 2004; Macklin 2010; Malpani 2002; McDougall 2005; Purdy 2007; Seavilleklein and Sherwin 2007; Steinbock 2002; Strange and Chadwick 2010; Wilkinson 2008). While abortion or infanticide has long been used as means of sex selection, a new technology—preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)—has (...)
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  14. The Ethics of Discriminatory Sex-Selective Abortion: Is Legal Prohibition Our Best Option?Sue Hall - 2013 - The Specialist Forum 10 (13):32-33.
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  15. Queerin’ the PGD Clinic: Human Enhancement and the Future of Bodily Diversity.Robert Sparrow - 2013 - Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):177-196.
    Disability activists influenced by queer theory and advocates of “human enhancement” have each disputed the idea that what is “normal” is normatively significant, which currently plays a key role in the regulation of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Previously, I have argued that the only way to avoid the implication that parents have strong reasons to select children of one sex (most plausibly, female) over the other is to affirm the moral significance of sexually dimorphic human biological norms. After outlining the (...)
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  16. Are Old Males Still Good Males and Can Females Tell the Difference?Sheri L. Johnson & Neil J. Gemmell - 2012 - Bioessays 34 (7):609-619.
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  17. Looking for a Few Good Males: Female Choice in Evolutionary Biology. [REVIEW]Marga Vicedo - 2011 - Isis 102:352-353.
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  18. Is Selection of Children Wrong?Dan W. Brock - 2010 - In Julian Savulescu & Nick Bostrom (eds.), Human Enhancement. Oxford University Press.
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  19. “Before You Formed in the Womb I Knew You”: Sex Selection and Spaces of Ambiguity.Anna Mudde - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (3):553-576.
    The spaces provided by biotechnologies of sex selection are rich with epistemological, ontological, and ethical considerations that speak to broadly held social values and epistemic frameworks. In much of the discourse about sex selection that is not medically indicated, the figure of the “naturally” conceived child is treated as a problem for parents who want to select the sex of their child. As unknown, that child is ambiguous in terms of sex—“it” is both and neither, and might be the “wrong” (...)
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  20. Sex and Enhancement: A Phenomenological–Existential View.Guy Widdershoven, Annemie Halsema & Jenny Slatman - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):20-22.
  21. Sex Selection by Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Nonmedical Reasons in Contemporary Israeli Regulations.Richard V. Grazi, Joel B. Wolowelsky & David J. Krieger - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (3):293-299.
    We report here on recent developments in Israel on the issue of sex selection for nonmedical reasons by preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Sex selection for medical reasons is generally viewed as uncontroversial and legal in European and American law. Its use for nonmedical reasons is generally illegal in European countries. In the United States, it is not illegal, although in the opinion of the Ethics Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, it is problematic. This position is undergoing reconsideration, albeit (...)
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  22. Sex Selection and Women’s Reproductive Rights.James J. Hughes - 2008 - In At Issue: Should Parents Be Allowed to Choose the Gender of Their Children? pp. 31-40.
    A woman's right to know the contents of her own body, and to make a choice about whether to continue her pregnancy or not, should be defended against laws trying to stop prenatal sex selection, either in the developing world or in the developed world. Restrictions on women's reproductive freedom harm the interests of women and girls, and ignore myriad social policy solutions, such as education and income incentives to have girls and universal old age pensions, that provide better answers (...)
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  23. Sex Selection for Social Purposes in Israel: Quest for the "Perfect Child" of a Particular Gender or Centuries Old Prejudice Against Women?R. Landau - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e10-e10.
    On 9 May 2005, the Israeli Ministry of Health issued guidelines spelling out the conditions under which sex selection by preimplantation genetic diagnosis for social purposes is to be permitted in Israel. This article first reviews the available medical methods for sex selection, the preference for children of a specific gender in various societies and the ethical controversies surrounding PGD for medical and social purposes in different countries. It focuses then on the question of whether procreative liberty or parental responsibility (...)
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  24. Crossing the Psycho-Social Divide: Freud, Weber, Adorno and Elias.George Cavalletto - 2007 - Routledge.
    Presenting an analysis of key texts by Sigmund Freud, Max Weber, Theodor Adorno and Norbert Elias, this work shows that they crossed the psycho-social divide in ways that can help contemporary scholars to re-establish an analytical and theoretical understanding of the inherent interconnection of these two domains.
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  25. Parental Love and the Ethics of Sex Selection.Peter Herissone-Kelly - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (3):326-335.
    In 2003, the United Kingdom's Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority published a report entitled Sex Selection: Options for Regulation. The report outlined the findings of a 2-year review of available sex selection techniques and recommended that the United Kingdom ought not to permit any regulated technique to be used other than for medical reasons. In so doing, it reflected the widespread opinion—repeatedly expressed in the public consultations that formed the cornerstone of the HFEA's review—that there is something ethically unacceptable, or (...)
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  26. The “Parental Love” Objection to Nonmedical Sex Selection: Deepening the Argument.Peter Herissone-Kelly - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (4):446.
    In my paper “Parental Love and the Ethics of Sex Selection,” published in the previous issue of the Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, I set out to determine whether a plausible argument could be constructed in support of a common intuition about the ethics of sex selection. The intuition in question is that sex selection for nonmedical reasons is incompatible with a proper parental love: that is, with the sort of love that a parent ought to have for her child (...)
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  27. Choosing Between Possible Lives: Law and Ethics of Prenatal and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis.Rosamund Scott - 2007 - Hart.
    To what extent should parents be able to choose the kind of child they have? The unfortunate phrase 'designer baby' has become familiar in debates surrounding reproduction. As a reference to current possibilities the term is misleading, but the phrase may indicate a societal concern of some kind about control and choice in the course of reproduction. Typically, people can choose whether to have a child. They may also have an interest in choosing, to some extent, the conditions under which (...)
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  28. The Myth of the Gendered Chromosome: Sex Selection and the Social Interest.Victoria Seavilleklein & Susan Sherwin - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (1):7-19.
    Sex selection technologies have become increasingly prevalent and accessible. We can find them advertised widely across the Internet and discussed in the popular media—an entry for “sex selection services” on Google generated 859,000 sites in April 2004. The available services fall into three main types: preconception sperm sorting followed either by intrauterine insemination of selected sperm or by in vitro fertilization ; preimplantation genetic diagnosis, by which embryos created by IVF are tested and only those of the desired sex are (...)
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  29. Sex Selection and Restricting Abortion and Sex Determination: Sex-Selective Abortion for Social Reasons: Is It Ever Morally Justifiable?Julie Zilberberg - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (9):517-519.
  30. Evolution and “the Sex Problem”: American Narratives During the Eclipse of Darwinism. [REVIEW]Richard Bellon - 2006 - Isis 97:359-360.
  31. The Prohibition of Sex Selection for Social Reasons in the United Kingdom: Public Opinion Trumps Reproductive Liberty?Peter Herissone-Kelly - 2006 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (3):261-272.
    From 2002 to 2003, the United Kingdom's Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority carried out a review of the available methods of sex selection, the central aims of which were, in the words of the subsequent report.
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  32. No Sex Selection Please, We're British.J. Harris - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (5):286-288.
    There is a popular and widely accepted version of the precautionary principle which may be expressed thus: “If you are in a hole—stop digging!”. Tom Baldwin, as Deputy Chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority , may be excused for rushing to the defence of the indefensible,1 the HFEA’s sex selection report,2 but not surely for recklessly abandoning so prudent a principle. Baldwin has many complaints about my misrepresenting the HFEA and about my supposed elitist contempt for public opinion; (...)
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  33. Sex Selection and Regulated Hatred.J. Harris - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (5):291-294.
    This paper argues that the HFEA’s recent report on sex selection abdicates its responsibility to give its own authentic advice on the matters within its remit, that it accepts arguments and conclusions that are implausible on the face of it and where they depend on empirical claims, produces no empirical evidence whatsoever, but relies on reckless speculation as to what the “facts” are likely to be. Finally, having committed itself to what I call the “democratic presumption”, that human freedom will (...)
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  34. The Ethics of Using Genetic Engineering for Sex Selection.S. Matthew Liao - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):116-118.
    It is quite likely that parents will soon be able to use genetic engineering to select the sex of their child by directly manipulating the sex of an embryo. Some might think that this method would be a more ethical method of sex selection than present technologies such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) because, unlike PGD, it does not need to create and destroy “wrong gendered” embryos. This paper argues that those who object to present technologies on the grounds that (...)
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  35. Acting Parentally: An Argument Against Sex Selection.R. McDougall - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (10):601-605.
    The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority’s recent restrictive recommendations on sex selection have highlighted the need for consideration of the plausibility of ethical arguments against sex selection. In this paper, the author suggests a parental virtues approach to some questions of reproductive ethics as a superior alternative to an exclusively harm focused approach such as the procreative liberty framework. The author formulates a virtue ethics argument against sex selection based on the idea that acceptance is a character trait of the (...)
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  36. Adorno and the Modern Ethos of Freedom.Colin Hearfield - 2004 - Routledge.
    Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- A: INTRODUCTION -- B: LOGICS OF FREEDOM: KANT AND HEGEL -- B1. Self-Reflexive Freedom and Moral Reason: Kant -- B2. Social Freedom and Historical Reason: Hegel -- C: AESTHETICS OF EXISTENCE: NIETZSCHE AND HEIDEGGER -- C1. Life and Eternal Recurrence: Nietzsche -- C2. Death and Ontological Difference: Heidegger -- D: POLITICS OF TRUTH: FOUCAULT AND HABERMAS -- D1. Agonistic Ethics and Historical Ontology: Foucault -- D2. Communicative Morality and (...)
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  37. Like a Frog in Boiling Water: The Public, the HFEA and Sex Selection.Søren Holm - 2004 - Health Care Analysis 12 (1):27-39.
    This paper analyses the British Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority's 2002 public consultation on sex selection, a consultation that was mainly concerned with sex selection for non-medical reasons. Based on a close reading of the consultation document and questionnaire it is argued that the consultation is biased towards certain outcomes and can most plausibly be construed as an attempt not to investigate but to influence public opinion.
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  38. Sex Selection, Child Welfare and Risk: A Critique of the HFEA's Recommendations on Sex Selection.Juliet Tizzard - 2004 - Health Care Analysis 12 (1):61-68.
    This paper will examine the recent Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority public consultation on sex selection. It will review the current regulation on sex selection in the United Kingdom and critically examine the outcomes of the HFEA consultation. The paper will argue that the current ban on embryo sex selection for social reasons and a proposed ban on sperm selection are not justified. There is no evidence for sex selection causing an increase in sex discrimination; creating a slippery slope towards (...)
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  39. Human Dignity and Reproductive Technology.Patrick Guinan, Francis Cardinal George, Jean Bethke Elshtain, John M. Haas, Steven Bozza, Daniel P. Toma, Patrick Lee, William E. May, Richard M. Doerflinger & Gerard V. Bradley (eds.) - 2003 - Upa.
    The March 2002 symposium Human Dignity and Reproductive Technology brought together philosophers, theologians, scientists, lawyers, and scholars from across the United States. The essays of this book are the contributions of the symposium's participants.
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  40. Can Sex Selection Be Ethically Tolerated?B. M. Dickens - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (6):335-336.
  41. At Home with Down Syndrome and Gender.Sophia Isako Wong - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (3):89-117.
    : I argue that there is an important analogy between sex selection and selective abortion of fetuses diagnosed with Down syndrome. There are surprising parallels between the social construction of Down syndrome as a disability and the deeply entrenched institutionalization of sexual difference in many societies. Prevailing concepts of gender and mental retardation exert a powerful influence in constructing the sexual identities and life plans of people with Down syndrome, and also affect their families' lives.
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  42. Is There a Constitutional Right to Preconception Sex Selection?Carl H. Coleman - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):27 – 28.
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  43. Preconception Sex Selection: The Perspective of a Person of the Undesired Gender.Jenny Dai - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):37 – 38.
    (2001). Preconception Sex Selection: The Perspective of a Person of the Undesired Gender. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 37-38.
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  44. Controlling Consequences of Preconception Sex Selection.Owen D. Jones - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):19 – 20.
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  45. Difficulties with Regulating Sex Selection.David B. Resnik - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):21 – 22.
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  46. Acceptable Sex Selection.Rosamond Rhodes - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):31 – 32.
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  47. Preconception Sex Selection: A Commentary.Mark V. Sauer - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):28 – 29.
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  48. Preconception Sex Selection: A Question of Consequences.Dorothy C. Wertz - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):36 – 37.
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  49. Sex Selection for Non-Medical Reasons: Advisory Report of the Standing Committee on Medical Ethics and Health Law of the Health Council of the Netherlands.T. Chappell - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (2):120-121.
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  50. The Ant and the Peocock: Altruism and Sexual Selection From Darwin to Today by Helena Cronin. [REVIEW]Vassiliki Smocovitis - 1994 - Isis 85:349-351.
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