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  1. Laws of Credence and Laws of Choice.Sophie Horowitz - 2017 - Episteme 14 (1):31-37.
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  2. Sham Epistemic Authority and Implicit Racial Bias.Charles Lassiter - forthcoming - Social Epistemology:1-19.
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  3. 0 = ∞ The Nietzschean Concept of Becoming in the Figures of Christ and Zorba the Greek.Peter Klapes - 2018 - Episteme 29:21-28.
    In his Twilight of the Idols, Friedrich Nietzsche praises Heraclitus, the Greek pre-Socratic, for his “assertion that being is an empty fiction.” 1 The philosophical notion of being, which seems to refer to fixed entities or substances, is eclipsed (at least in the mind of Nietzsche [and perhaps other philosophers—Gilles Deleuze comes to mind]) by the notion of becoming. As a result of our innate nothingness—which I defend linguistically, via the structuralist concept of the arbitrary nature of the linguistic sign—it (...)
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  4. Finding Trust in Government.Paul Faulkner - 2018 - Journal of Social Philosophy 49 (4):626-644.
  5. Re-Evaluating the Credibility of Eyewitness Testimony: The Misinformation Effect and the Overcritical Juror.Katherine Puddifoot - forthcoming - Episteme:1-25.
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  6. Inability and Obligation in Intellectual Evaluation.Wesley Buckwalter & John Turri - forthcoming - Episteme:1-23.
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  7. Representation in Models of Epistemic Democracy.Patrick Grim, Aaron Bramson, Daniel J. Singer, William J. Berger, Jiin Jung & Scott E. Page - forthcoming - Episteme:1-21.
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  8. The Right Side of History and Higher-Order Evidence.Adam Green - forthcoming - Episteme:1-15.
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  9. Patient Centred Diagnosis: Sharing Diagnostic Decisions with Patients in Clinical Practice.Zackary Berger, J. P. Brito, Ns Ospina, S. Kannan, Js Hinson, Ep Hess, H. Haskell, V. M. Montori & D. Newman-Toker - 2017 - British Medical Journal 359:j4218.
    Patient centred diagnosis is best practised through shared decision making; an iterative dialogue between doctor and patient, whichrespects a patient’s needs, values, preferences, and circumstances. -/- Shared decision making for diagnostic situations differs fundamentally from that for treatment decisions. This has important implications when considering its practical application. -/- The nature of dialogue should be tailored to the specific diagnostic decision; scenarios with higher stakes or uncertainty usually require more detailed conversations.
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  10. What Experts Could Not Be.Jamie Carlin Watson - forthcoming - Social Epistemology:1-14.
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  11. Societies Within: Selfhood Through Dividualism & Relational Epistemology.Jonathan Morgan - manuscript
    Most see having their individuality stifled as equivalent to the terrible forced conformity found within speculative fiction like George Orwell's 1984. However, the oppression of others by those in power has often been justified through ideologies of individualism. If we look to animistic traditions, could we bridge the gap between these extremes? What effect would such a reevaluation of identity have on the modern understanding of selfhood? The term ' in-dividual' suggests an irreducible unit of identity carried underneath all of (...)
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  12. What an Entangled Web We Weave: An Information-Centric Approach to Time-Evolving Socio-Technical Systems.Markus Luczak-Roesch, Kieron O’Hara, Jesse David Dinneen & Ramine Tinati - 2018 - Minds and Machines 28 (4):709-733.
    A new layer of complexity, constituted of networks of information token recurrence, has been identified in socio-technical systems such as the Wikipedia online community and the Zooniverse citizen science platform. The identification of this complexity reveals that our current understanding of the actual structure of those systems, and consequently the structure of the entire World Wide Web, is incomplete, which raises novel questions for data science research but also from the perspective of social epistemology. Here we establish the principled foundations (...)
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  13. What is Justified Credence?Richard Pettigrew - forthcoming - Episteme:1-15.
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  14. Expertise, Relevance and Types of Knowledge.Pierluigi Barrotta & Eleonora Montuschi - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (6):387-396.
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  15. Are Experts Right or Are They Members of Expert Groups?Harry Collins - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (6):351-357.
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  16. The Rightful Place of Expertise.Reiner Grundmann - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (6):372-386.
    ABSTRACTExpertise has come under attack not least since the Brexit vote in the UK and Donald Trump’s election as President of the United States. In this contribution, I will provide some conceptual clarification and suggest a new topology of expertise. I will also examine the historical roots of this challenge to expertise and its social context using a comparative lens. I will ask what it could mean to speak of the rightful place of expertise. I will try to provide an (...)
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  17. Asymmetry, Disagreement and Biases: Epistemic Worries About Expertise.Cathrine Holst & Anders Molander - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (6):358-371.
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  18. Towards a Balanced Account of Expertise.Christian Quast - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (6):397-418.
    The interdisciplinary debate about the nature of expertise often conflates having expertise with either the individual possession of competences or a certain role ascription. In contrast to this, the paper attempts to demonstrate how different dimensions of expertise ascription are inextricably interwoven. As a result, a balanced account of expertise will be proposed that more accurately determines the closer relationship between the expert’s dispositions, their manifestations and the expert’s function. This finally results in an advanced understanding of expertise that views (...)
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  19. Epistemological Disjunctivism: Neo-Wittgensteinian and Moderate Neo-Moorean.Joshua Stuchlik - forthcoming - Episteme:1-20.
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  20. Conciliationism and Fictionalism.Marcus Hunt - 2018 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 4 (25):456-472.
    This paper offers fictionalism as a new approach to the problem of reasonable disagreement discussed in social epistemology. The conciliationist approach to reasonable disagreement is defined, and three problems with it are posed: that it is destructive of inquiry, self-defeating, and unacceptably revisionary. Hans Vaihinger’s account of fictions is explained, and it is shown that if the intellectual commitments that are the subject of reasonable disagreements are treated as fictions rather than as beliefs, the three noted problems are avoided. Whereas (...)
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  21. Post-Normal Science. The Escape of Science: From Truth to Quality?Agnieszka Karpińska - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (5):338-350.
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  22. Cajal: Key Psychological Factors in the Self-Construction of a Genius.Nuria Anaya-Reig - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (5):311-324.
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  23. Moral Responsibility, Culpable Ignorance and Suppressed Disagreement.Katherine Furman - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (5):287-299.
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  24. What Ignorance Really Is. Examining the Foundations of Epistemology of Ignorance.Nadja El Kassar - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (5):300-310.
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  25. Under What Conditions May Western Science and Indigenous Knowledge Be Jointly Used and What Does This Really Entail? Insights From a Western Perspectivist Stance.Fulvio Mazzocchi - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (5):325-337.
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  26. Improving Deliberations by Reducing Misrepresentation Effects.Cyrille Imbert, Thomas Boyer-Kassem, Vincent Chevrier & Christine Bourjot - forthcoming - Episteme:1-17.
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  27. Uso de Open Journal System En Revistas Científicas Peruanas.Victoria Yance-Yupari - 2018 - Cultura 32:353-366.
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  28. The Disastrous Implications of the 'English' View of Rationality in a Social World.Seungbae Park - forthcoming - Social Epistemology:1-12.
    Van Fraassen (2007, 2017) consistently uses the English view of rationality to parry criticisms from scientific realists. I assume for the sake of argument that the English view of rationality is tenable, and then argue that it has disastrous implications for van Fraassen’s (1980) contextual theory of explanation, for the empiricist position that T is empirically adequate, and for scientific progress. If you invoke the English view of rationality to rationally disbelieve that your epistemic colleagues’ theories are true, they might, (...)
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  29. Implicit Bias and Prejudice.Jules Holroyd & Kathy Puddifoot - forthcoming - In Miranda Fricker, Peter J. Graham, David Henderson, Nikolaj Pedersen & Jeremy Wyatt (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Social Epistemology.
    Recent empirical research has substantiated the finding that very many of us harbour implicit biases: fast, automatic, and difficult to control processes that encode stereotypes and evaluative content, and influence how we think and behave. Since it is difficult to be aware of these processes - they have sometimes been referred to as operating 'unconsciously' - we may not know that we harbour them, nor be alert to their influence on our cognition and action. And since they are difficult to (...)
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  30. Looking Beyond Reductionism and Anti-Reductionism.Felix Bräuer - forthcoming - Episteme:1-19.
    Under which conditions are we epistemically justied to believe that what other people tell us is true? Traditionally, the answer has either been reductionist or anti-reductionist: Either our justication reduces to non-testimonial reasons, or we have a presumptive, though defeasible, right to believe what we are told. However, different cases pull in different directions. Intuitively, someone asking for the time is subject to different epistemic standards than a surgeon consulting a colleague before a dangerous operation. Following this line of thought, (...)
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  31. Subject-Sensitive Invariantism, High-Stakes/Low-Stakes Cases, and Presupposition Suspension.Michael Blome-Tillmann - forthcoming - Episteme:1-6.
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  32. Looking for Collective Scientific Knowledge.Raul Hakli - 2018 - Metascience 27 (3):465-468.
    A book review of Susann Wagenknecht: A Social Epistemology of Research Groups, Palgrave, 2016.
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  33. Propositional Learning: From Ignorance to Knowledge.Pierre Le Morvan - forthcoming - Episteme:1-16.
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  34. Contextualism and the Ambiguity Theory of ‘Knows’.Mark Satta - forthcoming - Episteme:1-21.
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  35. Irrelevant Cultural Influences on Belief.Robin McKenna - forthcoming - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    Recent work in psychology on ‘cultural cognition’ suggests that our cultural background drives our attitudes towards a range of politically contentious issues in science such as global warming. This work is part of a more general attempt to investigate the ways in which our wants, wishes and desires impact on our assessments of information, events and theories. Put crudely, the idea is that we conform our assessments of the evidence for and against scientific theories with clear political relevance to our (...)
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  36. Review of Patrick J. Reider, Social Epistemology and Epistemic Agency. [REVIEW]Edward Hinchman - 2018 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 7 (02).
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  37. Could Knowledge-Talk Be Largely Non-Literal?Julianne Chung - 2018 - Episteme 15 (4):383-411.
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  38. Limited Epistocracy and Political Inclusion.Anne Jeffrey - 2018 - Episteme 15 (4):412-432.
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  39. Secrecy and Conspiracy.Matthew R. X. Dentith & Martin Orr - 2018 - Episteme 15 (4):433-450.
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  40. Epistemic Environmentalism.Shane Ryan - 2018 - Journal of Philosophical Research 43:97-112.
    I motivate and develop a normative framework for undertaking work in applied epistemology. I set out the framework, which I call epistemic environmentalism, explaining the role of social epistemology and epistemic value theory in the framework. Next, I explain the environmentalist terminology that is employed and its usefulness. In the second part of the paper, I make the case for a specific epistemic environmentalist proposal. I argue that dishonest testimony by experts and certain institutional testifiers should be liable to the (...)
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  41. Standard Bearers.David Sosa - 2017 - Episteme 14 (3):329-341.
    In both ethics and epistemology an important question is whether justification is a fully internal or a partly external matter. In view of analogies between relevant considerations in each area, I recommend distinguishing, as basic and independent subjects of normative status, (i) people and (ii) what they do. Evaluations of subjects, on one hand, and of their beliefs and actions, on the other, are less intimately related than is presupposed. This helps resolve internalism/externalism controversies in both domains. An important related (...)
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  42. A Philosophical Ethnography of Human-Computer Interaction.Stephen M. Downes - 1987 - Social Epistemology 1 (1):27-36.
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  43. Knowledge and the Public World: Arendt on Science, Truth, and Politics.Javier Burdman - 2018 - Constellations 25 (3):485-496.
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  44. Philosophy of Population Health: Philosophy for a New Public Health Era.Sean A. Valles - 2018 - Abingdon OX14, UK: Routledge.
    Population health has recently grown from a series of loosely connected critiques of twentieth-century public health and medicine into a theoretical framework with a corresponding field of research—population health science. Its approach is to promote the public’s health through improving everyday human life: affordable nutritious food, clean air, safe places where children can play, living wages, etc. It recognizes that addressing contemporary health challenges such as the prevalence of type 2 diabetes will take much more than good hospitals and public (...)
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  45. Short Report on Initial Political Polarization/Argument Visualization Study.Simon Cullen & Vidushi Sharma - manuscript
    This document provides a brief report on initial research into how argument presentation (visual map vs. regular prose) affects people's susceptibility to confirmation bias as well as their feelings toward political opponents. Using highly polarizing stimuli, we found that argument visualization substantially reduced confirmation bias and, for participants with low CRT scores, the belief that one's political opponents are morally evil.
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  46. Epistemic Injustice and Its Amelioration.Ben Almassi - forthcoming - Social Philosophy Today.
    Recent works by feminist and social epistemologists have carefully mapped the contours of epistemic injustice, including gaslighting and prejudicial credibility deficits, prejudicial credibility excesses, willful hermeneutical ignorance, discursive injustices, contributory injustice, and epistemic exploitation. As we look at this burgeoning literature, attention has been concentrated mainly in four areas in descending order of emphasis: phenomena of epistemic injustice themselves, including the nature of wrongdoings involved, attendant consequences and repercussions, individual and structural changes for prevention or mitigation, and restorative, restitutive, or (...)
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  47. Structural Descriptions of Social Transactions Among Young Children: Affiliation and Dominance in Preschool Groups.Brian E. Vaughn & António J. Santos - 2009 - In William M. Bukowski, Brett Laursen & Kenneth H. Rubin (eds.), Handbook of Peer Interactions, Relationships, and Groups. Guildford Press.
    Describing and explaining the benefits and costs of sociality have occupied the attention of political, social, and economic philosophers and social, behavioral, and developmental scientists for over 400 years. The fundamental questions have been why and how it is that self-interest becomes subordinated (or not) to the interests of group comembers and why or how group norms, values, and structures change as a consequence of the actions of their constituent members and/or the embedding contexts of the group. Whereas philosophical treatments (...)
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  48. Socioethological/Developmental Principles and Perspectives on Peer Interactions, Relationships, and Groups From Early Childhood Through Adolescence.António J. Santos & Brian E. Vaughn - 2018 - In William M. Bukowski, Brett Laursen & Kenneth H. Rubin (eds.), Handbook of Peer Interactions, Relationships, and Groups. Gilford Press.
    Parental and peer socialization experiences provide crucial, formative inputs during infancy and early childhood, and by 6 years of age, the child’s brain develops into its full size; the brain’s basic connectivity architecture is laid out, both within and between 'regional' brain areas. Peer affiliation and play, in particular, are extremely important for learning reciprocity and other social and social-cognitive skills; unfortunately, there is a major disparity in the relative inattention to affiliation and play in infancy and early childhood by (...)
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  49. An Evolutionary/Ecological Account of Aggressive Behavior and Trait Aggression in Human Children and Adolescents.Brian E. Vaughn & António J. Santos - 2007 - In Todd D. Little, Philip C. Rodkin & Patricia H. Hawley (eds.), Aggression and adaptation: The bright side to bad behavior. Routledge.
    The problem of interpersonal aggression and trait aggressiveness has festered within the social and behavioral sciences as well as in psychiatry for more than a century. Whether the source of the problem is located in the person, as external to the person, or in the contexts that relate the person to environments, most clinical and/or developmental explanations of aggressive behavior and trait aggression have in common the underlying beliefs that aggressive behavior and trait aggressiveness are undesirable, bad, maladaptive, and probably (...)
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  50. Is True Belief Really a Fundamental Epistemic Value?Lance K. Aschliman - forthcoming - Episteme:1-17.
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