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  1. Epistemology and Knowledge Management.Jeremy Aarons - unknown
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  2. The Conspiracy Doctrine: A Critique.Fred J. Abbate - 1974 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 3 (3):295-311.
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  3. Playing Fair with Experiments: A Reply to Pitt and Westrum.Robert Ackermann - 1989 - Social Epistemology 3 (1):63 – 65.
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  4. Experiment as the Motor of Scientific Progress.Robert Ackermann - 1988 - Social Epistemology 2 (4):327 – 335.
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  5. Ontological Bourdieu? A Reply to Simon Susen.Lisa Adkins - 2013 - Social Epistemology 27 (3-4):295-301.
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  6. The Intellectual by Steve Fuller.J. Agassi - 2006 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (2):241.
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  7. Epistemology and the Social: A Feedback Loop.Evandro Agazzi - 2008 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 96 (1):19-31.
    A sociological study of science is not very recent and has never been seen as particularly problematic since science, and especially modern science, constitutes an impressive and extremely ramified "social system" of activities, institutions, relations and interferences with other social systems. Less favourable, however, has been the consideration of a more recent trend in the philosophy of science known as the "sociological" philosophy of science, whose most debatable point consists in directly challenging the traditional epistemology of science and, in particular, (...)
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  8. Epistemology and the Social.Evandro Agazzi, Javier Echeverría & Amparo Gómez Rodríguez - 2008 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 96 (1):7-16.
    These are some of the topics discussed in this book, both theoretically and with reference to concrete cases.
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  9. The Essential Fit Between Qualitative Methodology and Emirati Population: Towards Meaningful Social Science Research in UAE.Shaima Ahammed - 2015 - Social Epistemology 29 (3):344-358.
    One of the most fundamental problems plaguing the state of social science research in the United Arab Emirates is the lack of methodologies that appropriately respond to the cultural context of the country. Most social science research published from the region has merely transplanted Western quantitative methods and has proved ineffective as very few social problems in UAE have been appropriately responded to by social science research. This paper suggests the use of qualitative methods to make social science research in (...)
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  10. Why Deliberative Democracy is (Still) Untenable.Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij - 2012 - Public Affairs Quarterly 26 (3):199-220.
    A common objection to deliberative democracy is that available evidence on public ignorance makes it unlikely that social deliberation among the public is a process likely to yield accurate outputs. The present paper considers—and ultimately rejects—two responses to this objection. The first response is that the correct conclusion to draw from the evidence is simply that we must work harder to ensure that the deliberative process improves the deliberators’ epistemic situation. The main problem for this response is that there are (...)
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  11. Perelmanian Universal Audience and the Epistemic Aspirations of Argument.Scott F. Aikin - 2008 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 41 (3):pp. 238-259.
  12. Straw Men, Weak Men, and Hollow Men.Scott Aikin & John Casey - 2011 - Argumentation 25 (1):87-105.
    Three forms of the straw man fallacy are posed: the straw, weak, and hollow man. Additionally, there can be non-fallacious cases of any of these species of straw man arguments.
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  13. Negotiating Pictures of Numbers.Morana Alač - 2004 - Social Epistemology 18 (2-3):199-214.
    This paper reports on objectivity and knowledge production in the process of submitting, revising, and publishing an experimental research article in cognitive neuroscience. The review process, as part of scientific practice, is of particular interest, since it puts the research team in direct dialog with a larger scientific community concerned with fMRI evidence. By bringing this often ?black?boxed? dimension of the manuscript?s production into the picture, I illustrate the role that the visual brain representations played in the practice of scientific (...)
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  14. The Author Responds: Albury to Fuller.Randall Albury - 1987 - Social Epistemology 1 (4):363 – 364.
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  15. On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant?Linda Martin Alcoff - 2000 - In Naomi Zack (ed.), On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant? Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 235-262.
  16. A Conspiracy of Optimism: Management of the National Forests Since World War Two. Paul W. Hirt.Thomas G. Alexander - 1995 - Isis 86 (4):690-691.
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  17. The Seduction of Winston Smith.Mark Alfano - 2018 - In Ezio Di Nucci & Stefan Storrie (eds.), 1984 and Philosophy. Open Court.
    On the first page of 1984, Winston Smith is confronted with several posters featuring the face of Big Brother and the famous sentence, “BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU.” This may not seem like a promising way to seduce someone, but the seduction of Winston Smith by Big Brother in 1984 is a most unusual love story. I call it a seduction because Winston’s mind and heart are slowly won over in the aptly-named Ministry of Love. Moreover, in the final scene (...)
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  18. Technological Seduction and Self-Radicalization.Mark Alfano, Joseph Adam Carter & Marc Cheong - 2018 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association.
    Many scholars agree that the Internet plays a pivotal role in self-radicalization, which can lead to behaviours ranging from lone-wolf terrorism to participation in white nationalist rallies to mundane bigotry and voting for extremist candidates. However, the mechanisms by which the Internet facilitates self-radicalization are disputed; some fault the individuals who end up self-radicalized, while others lay the blame on the technology itself. In this paper, we explore the role played by technological design decisions in online self-radicalization in its myriad (...)
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  19. Indigenized Psychologies.Carl Martin Allwood - 2002 - Social Epistemology 16 (4):349 – 366.
    In this paper the nature of the indigenized psychologies is discussed. The ongoing development of indigenized psychologies is an important phenomenon that gives rise to many important and interesting questions, not the least of which concerns the conditions for the development and transfer of traditions of understanding between different social and cultural contexts. The indigenized psychologies are distinguished by being reactions to what is seen as modern mainstream western (US) psychology, by being (more or less) anchored in the identified culture (...)
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  20. The Role of Research Problems in the Process of Research.Carl Martin Allwood & Jan Barmark - 1999 - Social Epistemology 13 (1):59-83.
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  21. Comments on Tim Kenyon's "Oral History and the Epistemology of Testimony".Ben Almassi - 2015 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective.
  22. Expertise In Agriculture.Ben Almassi - 2014 - Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics.
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  23. The Technocratic Form in the Study of Mass Media Effects: An Application.David Altheide & Pat Lauderdale - 1987 - Social Epistemology 1 (2):183 – 186.
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  24. Epistemic Justice as a Virtue of Social Institutions.Elizabeth Anderson - 2012 - Social Epistemology 26 (2):163-173.
    In Epistemic injustice, Miranda Fricker makes a tremendous contribution to theorizing the intersection of social epistemology with theories of justice. Theories of justice often take as their object of assessment either interpersonal transactions (specific exchanges between persons) or particular institutions. They may also take a more comprehensive perspective in assessing systems of institutions. This systemic perspective may enable control of the cumulative effects of millions of individual transactions that cannot be controlled at the individual or institutional levels. This is true (...)
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  25. An Epistemic Defense of Democracy: David Estlund's Democratic Authority.Elizabeth Anderson - 2008 - Episteme 5 (1):pp. 129-139.
    In Democratic Authority, David Estlund 2008 presents a major new defense of democracy, called epistemic proceduralism. The theory claims that democracy exercises legitimate authority in virtue of possessing a modest epistemic power: its decisions are the product of procedures that tend to produce just laws at a better than chance rate, and better than any other type of government that is justifiable within the terms of public reason. The balance Estlund strikes between epistemic and non-epistemic justifications of democracy is open (...)
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  26. Responses to 'Pathologies of Science'.Sven Andersson, Elazar Barkan, Kenneth Caneva, Randall Collins, Stephen Downes, Henry Etzkowitz, Steve Fuller, David Gorman, Frederick Grinnell, David Hollinger, Anne Holmquest & Charles Willard - 1987 - Social Epistemology 1 (3):249-281.
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  27. Hearing Our Cassandras: Ethical Criticism and Rhetorical Receptions of Paul Ehrlich.Frederick Antczak - 1994 - Social Epistemology 8 (3):281 – 288.
    (1994). Hearing our cassandras: Ethical criticism and rhetorical receptions of Paul Ehrlich. Social Epistemology: Vol. 8, Public Indifference to Population Issues, pp. 281-288.
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  28. Social Relations and the Individuation of Thought.Michael V. Antony - 1993 - Mind 102 (406):247-61.
    Tyler Burge has argued that a necessary condition for individual's having many of the thoughts he has is that he bear certain relations to other language users. Burge's conclusion is based on a thought experiment in which an individual's social relations are imagined, counterfactually, to differ from how they are actually. The result is that it seems, counterfactually, the individual cannot be attributed many of the thoughts he can be actually. In the article, an alternative interpretation of Burge's thought experiment (...)
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  29. Animal Groups and Social Ontology: An Argument From the Phenomenology of Behavior.Alejandro Arango - 2016 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (3):403-422.
    Through a critical engagement with Merleau-Ponty’s discussion of the concepts of nature, life, and behavior, and with contemporary accounts of animal groups, this article argues that animal groups exhibit sociality and that sociality is a fundamental ontological condition. I situate my account in relation to the superorganism and selfish individual accounts of animal groups in recent biology and zoology. I argue that both accounts are inadequate. I propose an alternative account of animal groups and animal sociality through a Merleau-Pontian inspired (...)
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  30. Psychology, Fredrik Sundqvist. Acta Philosophica Gothoburgensia 16. Göteborg: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis, 2003, Xi+ 248 Pp., Pb. No Price Given. Legitimizing Scientific Knowledge: An Introduction to Steve Fuller's Social Epistemology, Francis Remedios. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2003, Xii+ 143 Pp., $55.00. Gadamer's Repercussions: Reconsidering Philosophical Hermeneutics. Edited by Bruce. [REVIEW]Art as Performance - 2004 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 47:315-317.
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  31. Social Epistemology and Reflexivity: Two Versions of How to Be Really Useful. [REVIEW]Malcolm Ashmore - 1994 - Argumentation 8 (2):157-161.
    This essay argues that the really useful character of reflexivity is that it enables a radical critique of representation and its conventional material and rhetorical practices. It is uniquely able to produce paradox and thus disrupt discourses by undermining authorial privilege. Because Fuller's social epistemology is insensitive to its own reflexive implications, and limits itself to normative questions about knowledge policy, it is too limited — and limiting — to provide a context that can nurture reflexivity.
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  32. The Reflexive Thesis: Wrighting Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Malcolm Ashmore - 1989 - University of Chicago Press.
    This unusually innovative book treats reflexivity, not as a philosophical conundrum, but as a practical issue that arises in the course of scholarly research and argument. In order to demonstrate the concrete and consequential nature of reflexivity, Malcolm Ashmore concentrates on an area in which reflexive "problems" are acute: the sociology of scientific knowledge. At the forefront of recent radical changes in our understanding of science, this increasingly influential mode of analysis specializes in rigorous deconstructions of the research practices and (...)
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  33. Practical Objectivity: The Excise, State, and Production in Eighteenth Century England.William J. Ashworth - 2004 - Social Epistemology 18 (2 & 3):181 – 197.
    During eighteenth century England the Excise Department was at the vanguard of negotiating the criteria and parameters of what I call "practical objectivity", namely, putting objectivity into administrative practice. This frequently required both the space of production and the actual product to be reconfigured to meet the criteria of the excise's form of measurement. As this essay shows this was a contested, mutable and ambiguous process. Within this context ultimate agreement over objectivity was administratively rather than philosophically driven.
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  34. Pliny Epistulae 4.13: “Communal Conspiracy” at Comum.Antony Augoustakis - 2006 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 99 (4):419-422.
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  35. Provocation on the Politics of Government-Funded Research. Part.Harvey Averch - 1990 - Social Epistemology 4 (1):127 – 129.
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  36. Recovering Responsibility.Guy Axtell - 2011 - Logos and Episteme (3):429-454..
    This paper defends the epistemological importance of ‘diachronic’ or cross-temporal evaluation of epistemic agents against an interesting dilemma posed for this view in Trent Dougherty’s recent paper “Reducing Responsibility.” This is primarily a debate between evidentialists and character epistemologists, and key issues of contention that the paper treats include the divergent functions of synchronic and diachronic (longitudinal) evaluations of agents and their beliefs, the nature and sources of epistemic normativity, and the advantages versus the costs of the evidentialists’ reductionism about (...)
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  37. The Professional Quest for Truth by Stephan Fuchs.Guy Axtell - 1994 - Social Epistemology 8 (1):69 – 80.
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  38. The Multicultural Mystique: The Liberal Case Against Diversity.Harriet Erica Baber - 2008 - Prometheus Books.
    Introduction: is multiculturism good for anyone? -- Do people like their cultures? -- A philosophical prelude: what is multiculturalism? -- The costs of multiculturalism -- The diversity trap: why everybody wants to be an X -- White privilege and the asymmetry of choice -- Communities: respecting the establishment of religion -- Multiculturalism and the good life -- The cult of cultural self-affirmation -- Identity-making -- Identity politics: the making of a mystique -- Policy.
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  39. Underdog Epistemologies and the Muscular, Masculine of Science Hindutva.Zaheer Baber - 2005 - Social Epistemology 19 (1):93 – 98.
    The rise of chauvinist, bigoted and sectarian politics in India coincided with the critique and blanket dismissal of modern science by some Indian intellectuals. The elective affinities between these two developments and the larger global intellectual and politial context have been analyzed in great detail by Meera Nanda. This paper provides a critical examination and appreciation of the enormous intellectual and political significance of Nanda's work.
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  40. The Taming of Science and Technology Studies.Zaheer Baber - 2003 - Social Epistemology 17 (2 & 3):95 – 98.
    Discusses the use by several philosophers of the book "The Structure of Scientific Revolutions," by philosopher Thomas S. Kuhn, as an intellectual source for attacking the sociology of science proposed by Robert K. Merton and his students. Assertion by Kuhn that the philosophers attacking Merton had misconstructed his ideas; Sociology of Kuhnian sociology of science established by Steve Fuller.
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  41. The Textures of 'Belief': An Interdisciplinary Study Towards a Social Scientific Epistemology.Bosco Bae - unknown
    This thesis develops an interdisciplinary dialogue between philosophy and the social sciences through an investigation of ‘belief.’ Drawing on anthropology, epistemology, and social psychology, the thesis argues that epistemology can assist social science through its analytic utility and capacity for clarification in distinguishing the textures of ‘belief’ while social science challenges epistemology to develop a more descriptive, interactive, and multidimensional account of ‘belief.’ The thesis further argues that ‘beliefs’ bind society and individual together and serve as the units of embodiment (...)
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  42. Social Capital in Changing Capitalism.Arnaldo Bagnasco - 2003 - Social Epistemology 17 (4):359 – 380.
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  43. A Symposium on the Role of the Philosopher Among the Scientists: Nuisance or Necessity?Brian Baigrie - 1989 - Social Epistemology 3 (4):311 – 318.
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  44. Popper and Progress: A Reply to Campbell.Brian Baigrie - 1989 - Social Epistemology 3 (1):65 – 69.
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  45. Why Evolutionary Epistemology is an Endangered Theory.Brian Baigrie - 1988 - Social Epistemology 2 (4):357 – 369.
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  46. Social Epistemology, Scientific Practice and the Elusive Social.Brian S. Baigrie - 1994 - Argumentation 8 (2):125-144.
    Social Epistemology, as formulated by Steve Fuller, is based on the suggestion that rational knowledge policy must be held accountable to ‘brute facts’ about the nature of our human cognitive pursuits, whatever these may be. One difficulty for Fuller concerns the conception of the social which underwrites social epistemology. I argue that social epistemology conflates the social with human psychological properties that are available for public scrutiny and, accordingly, that social epistemology is best viewed as a brand of psychologism. Though (...)
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  47. On Intersectionality and the Whiteness of Feminist Philosophy.Alison Bailey - 2010 - In George Yancy (ed.), THE CENTER MUST NOT HOLD: WHITE WOMEN PHILOSOPHERS ON THE WHITENESS OF PHILOSOPHY. Lexington Books.
    In this paper I explore some possible reasons why white feminists philosophers have failed to engage the radical work being done by non-Western women, U.S. women of color and scholars of color outside of the discipline. -/- Feminism and academic philosophy have had lots to say to one another. Yet part of what marks feminist philosophy as philosophy is our engagement with the intellectual traditions of the white forefathers. I’m not uncomfortable with these projects: Aristotle, Foucault, Sartre, Wittgenstein, Quine, Austin, (...)
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  48. Learning From Others.David Bakhurst - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (2):187-203.
    John McDowell begins his essay ‘Knowledge by Hearsay’ (1993) by describing two ways language matters to epistemology. The first is that, by understanding and accepting someone else's utterance, a person can acquire knowledge. This is what philosophers call ‘knowledge by testimony’. The second is that children acquire knowledge in the course of learning their first language—in acquiring language, a child inherits a conception of the world. In The Formation of Reason (2011), and my writings on Russian socio-historical philosophy and psychology, (...)
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  49. Una racionalidad emergente en la educación.Jorge Balladares - 2013 - Sophia. Colección de Filosofía de la Educación 14.
    Is it possible to think about an education that responds to contemporary needs? Is there a new way to think for an emerging education? This paper invites the reader to reflect philosophically about the educational challenges from a new emerging rationality. Besides the logic and instrumental reason of Modernity, the emerging rationality appears in education as an inclusive, colloquial and integrative new way to think.
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  50. Epistemic Trespassing.Nathan Ballantyne - forthcoming - Mind:fzx042.
    Epistemic trespassers judge matters outside their field of expertise. Trespassing is ubiquitous in this age of interdisciplinary research and recognizing this will require us to be more intellectually modest.
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