Sociology of Science

Edited by Markus Seidel (University of Münster)
Assistant editor: Charlott Becker (University of Münster)
About this topic
Summary Sociology of Science aims at an understanding of the social aspects of science. It comprises research about the social structure of the institutions of science and their relationship to other institutions as well as the influence on and construction of scientific knowledge.
Key works Barnes et al 1996 states the prominent 'Strong programme', Collins 1985 presents the sociology of science of the so-called 'Bath school', Fleck 1979 is an early classic in sociology of science, In Latour & Woolgar 1986 a constructivist approach in the sociology of science is defended, Merton 1973 is a collection of key essays by probably the most prominent sociologist of science, De Solla Price is one of the founding fathers of scientometrics , In Shapin & Schaffer 1985, you find an influential case study
Introductions Barnes et al 1996 can be read as an introduction to the field, Helen Longino's article in the Stanford Encyclopedia provides introductory insight in the social dimensions of scientific knowledge
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2627 found
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1 — 50 / 2627
  1. added 2019-11-08
    From Völkerpsychologie to the Sociology of Knowledge.Martin Kusch - 2019 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 9 (2):250-274.
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  2. added 2019-11-08
    Michael Polanyi and His Generation: Origins of the Social Construction of Science.Mary Jo Nye - 2013 - University of Chicago Press.
    In _Michael Polanyi and His Generation_, Mary Jo Nye investigates the role that Michael Polanyi and several of his contemporaries played in the emergence of the social turn in the philosophy of science. This turn involved seeing science as a socially based enterprise that does not rely on empiricism and reason alone but on social communities, behavioral norms, and personal commitments. Nye argues that the roots of the social turn are to be found in the scientific culture and political events (...)
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  3. added 2019-11-08
    Science, Technology and Society: A Cross-Disciplinary Perspective. Ina Spiegel-Rösing, Derek de Solla Price.Joshua Menkes & Evan Vlachos - 1978 - Isis 69 (3):439-441.
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  4. added 2019-10-21
    Evolutionary Epistemology, Language, and Culture: A Non-Adaptationist Systems Theoretical Approach.Nathalie Gontier, Jean Paul Van Bendegem & Diederik Aerts (eds.) - 2006 - Springer.
    For the first time in history, scholars working on language and culture from within an evolutionary epistemological framework, and thereby emphasizing complementary or deviating theories of the Modern Synthesis, were brought together. Of course there have been excellent conferences on Evolutionary Epistemology in the past, as well as numerous conferences on the topics of Language and Culture. However, until now these disciplines had not been brought together into one all-encompassing conference. Moreover, previously there never had been such stress on alternative (...)
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  5. added 2019-10-14
    Understanding Implicit Bias: Putting the Criticism Into Perspective.Michael Brownstein, Alex Madva & Bertram Gawronski - forthcoming - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
    What is the status of research on implicit bias? In light of meta-analyses revealing ostensibly low average correlations between implicit measures and behavior, as well as various other psychometric concerns, criticism has become ubiquitous. We argue that while there are significant challenges and ample room for improvement, research on the causes, psychological properties, and behavioral effects of implicit bias continues to deserve a role in the sciences of the mind as well as in efforts to understand, and ultimately combat, discrimination (...)
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  6. added 2019-10-07
    Epistemic Paternalism: Conceptions, Justifications and Implications.Guy Axtell & Amiel Bernal (eds.) - 2020 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This volume considers forms of information manipulation and restriction in contemporary society, paying special attention to contemporary paternalistic practices in big data and scientific research, as the way in which the flow of information or knowledge might be curtailed by the manipulations of a small body of experts or algorithms.
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  7. added 2019-09-26
    Bilim ve Sözde Bilim: Bilimsel Topluluğun Doğasının Belirlenmesi ve Sözde Bilimin Ayırt Edilmesine Yönelik Sosyal Bir Ölçüt.Alper Bilgehan Yardımcı - 2019 - Kaygı. Uludağ Üniversitesi Fen-Edebiyat Fakültesi Felsefe Dergisi 18 (2):567-588.
    Bilimin ne olduğunun tespit edilmesi ve bilimi sözde bilimlerden ya da bilimsel olmayan alanlardan ayırt edecek ölçütün ne olması gerektiğine yönelik tartışma, bilim felsefesinde sınır çizme sorunu olarak ele alınmaktadır. Bu makalede, öncelikle söz konusu soruna yönelik geleneksel yaklaşımlar incelenmiş ve ardından bu yaklaşımların bilimsel toplulukların doğasına ilişkin özellikleri göz ardı ettiği ortaya konmuştur. Daha önce yapılan çalışmalar bilimi daha çok önermeler, ifadeler ya da salt epistemik bir sistem olarak ele almakta ve bilimsel akıl yürütmenin biçimi ile bilimsel kuramların özelliklerine (...)
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  8. added 2019-09-20
    Balancing the Normativity of Expertise.Markus Seidel - 2019 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 8 (7):34-40.
  9. added 2019-09-14
    Is Peer Review a Good Idea?Remco Heesen & Liam Kofi Bright - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axz029.
    Prepublication peer review should be abolished. We consider the effects that such a change will have on the social structure of science, paying particular attention to the changed incentive structure and the likely effects on the behaviour of individual scientists. We evaluate these changes from the perspective of epistemic consequentialism. We find that where the effects of abolishing prepublication peer review can be evaluated with a reasonable level of confidence based on presently available evidence, they are either positive or neutral. (...)
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  10. added 2019-09-14
    Epistemic Diversity and Editor Decisions: A Statistical Matthew Effect.Remco Heesen & Jan-Willem Romeijn - 2019 - Philosophers' Imprint 19 (39).
    This paper offers a new angle on the common idea that the process of science does not support epistemic diversity. Under minimal assumptions on the nature of journal editing, we prove that editorial procedures, even when impartial in themselves, disadvantage less prominent research programs. This purely statistical bias in article selection further skews existing differences in the success rate and hence attractiveness of research programs, and exacerbates the reputation difference between the programs. After a discussion of the modeling assumptions, the (...)
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  11. added 2019-09-08
    Silent Performances: Are “Repertoires” Really Post-Kuhnian?Matthew Sample - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 61:51-56.
    Ankeny and Leonelli propose “repertoires” as a new way to understand the stability of certain research programs as well as scientific change in general. By bringing a more complete range of social, material, and epistemic elements into one framework, they position their work as a correction for the Kuhnian impulse in philosophy of science and other areas of science studies. I argue that this “post-Kuhnian” move is not complete, and that repertoires maintain an internalist perspective, caused partly by an asymmetrical (...)
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  12. added 2019-08-24
    The Postwar American Scientific Instrument Industry.Sean F. Johnston - 2007 - In Workshop on postwar American high tech industry, Chemical Heritage Foundation, Philadelphia, 21-22 June 2007.
    The production of scientific instruments in America was neither a postwar phenomenon nor dramatically different from that of several other developed countries. It did, however, undergo a step-change in direction, size and style during and after the war. The American scientific instrument industry after 1945 was intimately dependent on, and shaped by, prior American and European experience. This was true of the specific genres of instrument produced commercially; to links between industry and science; and, just as importantly, to manufacturing practices (...)
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  13. added 2019-08-13
    The Young-(Helmholtz)-Maxwell Theory of Color Vision.Remco Heesen - manuscript
    In the second volume of the "Handbuch der physiologischen Optik", published in 1860, Helmholtz sets out a three-receptor theory of color vision using coterminal response curves, and shows that this theory can unify most phenomena of color mixing known at the time. Maxwell had publicized the same theory five years earlier, but Helmholtz barely acknowledges this fact in the "Handbuch". Some historians have argued that this is because Helmholtz independently discovered the theory around the same time as Maxwell. This paper (...)
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  14. added 2019-07-29
    2. The Correspondence of Thomas Merton and Czeslaw Milosz: Monasticism and Society in Dialogue.O. S. B. Jeremy Driscoll - 2008 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 11 (3).
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  15. added 2019-07-16
    Absorbing New Subjects: Holography as an Analog of Photography.Sean F. Johnston - 2006 - Physics in Perspective 8:164-188.
    I discuss the early history of holography and explore how perceptions, applications, and forecasts of the subject were shaped by prior experience. I focus on the work of Dennis Gabor (1900–1979) in England,Yury N. Denisyuk (1927-2005) in the Soviet Union, and Emmett N. Leith (1927–2005) and Juris Upatnieks (b. 1936) in the United States. I show that the evolution of holography was simultaneously promoted and constrained by its identification as an analog of photography, an association that influenced its assessment by (...)
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  16. added 2019-07-08
    Holograms: The Story of a Word and its Cultural Uses.Sean F. Johnston - 2017 - Leonardo 50 (5):493-499.
    Holograms reached popular consciousness during the 1960s and have since left audiences alternately fascinated, bemused or inspired. Their impact was conditioned by earlier cultural associations and successive reimaginings by wider publics. Attaining peak public visibility during the 1980s, holograms have been found more in our pockets (as identity documents) and in our minds (as video-gaming fantasies and “faux hologram” performers) than in front of our eyes. The most enduring, popular interpretations of the word “hologram” evoke the traditional allure of magic (...)
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  17. added 2019-07-08
    Making the Invisible Engineer Visible: DuPont and the Recognition of Nuclear Expertise.Sean F. Johnston - 2011 - Technology and Culture 52 (3):548-573.
    Between 1942 and the late 1950s, atomic piles (nuclear chain-reactors) were industrialized, initially to generate plutonium for the first atomic weapons and later to serve as copious sources of neutrons, radioisotopes and electrical power. These facilities entrained a new breed of engineering specialist adept at designing, operating and maintaining them. From the beginning, large companies supplied the engineering labor for this new technology, and played an important role in defining the nature of their nuclear expertise. In the USA, the most (...)
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  18. added 2019-07-08
    Security and the Shaping of Identity for Nuclear Specialists.Sean F. Johnston - 2011 - History and Technology 27 (2):123-153.
    Atomic energy developed from 1940 as a subject shrouded in secrecy. Identified successively as a crucial element in military strategy, national status and export aspirations, the research and development of atomic piles (nuclear chain-reactors) were nurtured at isolated installations. Like monastic orders, new national laboratories managed their specialist workers in occupational environments that were simultaneously cosseted and constrained, defining regional variants of a new state-managed discipline: reactor technology. This paper discusses the significance of security in defining the new subject in (...)
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  19. added 2019-07-08
    Holographic Visions: A History of New Science.Sean F. Johnston - 2006 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Holography exploded on the scientific world in 1964, but its slow fuse had been burning much longer. Over the next four decades, the echoes of that explosion reached scientists, engineers, artists and popular culture. Emerging from classified military research, holography evolved to represent the power of post-war physics, an aesthetic union of art and science, the countercultural meanderings of holism, a cottage industry for waves of would-be entrepreneurs and a fertile plot device for science fiction. New working cultures sprang up (...)
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  20. added 2019-07-08
    From White Elephant to Nobel Prize: Dennis Gabor's Wavefront Reconstruction.Sean F. Johnston - 2005 - Historical Studies in the Physical and Biological Sciences 36:35-70.
    Dennis Gabor devised a new concept for optical imaging in 1947 that went by a variety of names over the following decade: holoscopy, wavefront reconstruction, interference microscopy, diffraction microscopy and Gaboroscopy. A well-connected and creative research engineer, Gabor worked actively to publicize and exploit his concept, but the scheme failed to capture the interest of many researchers. Gabor’s theory was repeatedly deemed unintuitive and baffling; the technique was appraised by his contemporaries to be of dubious practicality and, at best, constrained (...)
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  21. added 2019-07-02
    Vaunting the Independent Amateur: Scientific American and the Representation of Lay Scientists.Sean F. Johnston - 2018 - Annals of Science 75 (2):97-119.
    This paper traces how media representations encouraged enthusiasts, youth and skilled volunteers to participate actively in science and technology during the twentieth century. It assesses how distinctive discourses about scientific amateurs positioned them with respect to professionals in shifting political and cultural environments. In particular, the account assesses the seminal role of a periodical, Scientific American magazine, in shaping and championing an enduring vision of autonomous scientific enthusiasms. Between the 1920s and 1970s, editors Albert G. Ingalls and Clair L. Stong (...)
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  22. added 2019-07-02
    Revisiting the History of Relativity.Lewis Pyenson, Sean F. Johnston, Alberto A. Martínez & Richard Staley - 2011 - Metascience 20 (1):53-73.
    Revisiting the history of relativity Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9466-4 Authors Lewis Pyenson, Department of History, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5242, USA Sean F. Johnston, School of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Glasgow, Rutherford-McCowan Building, Dumfries, Glasgow, Scotland G2 0RB, UK Alberto A. Martínez, Department of History, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station B7000, Austin, TX 78712-0220, USA Richard Staley, Department of the History of Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 226 Bradley Memorial Building, 1225 Linden Drive, Madison, WI (...)
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  23. added 2019-07-02
    Scaling Up: The Evolution of Intellectual Apparatus Associated with the Manufacture of Heavy Chemicals in Britain, 1900-1939.Colin Divall & Sean F. Johnston - 1998 - In A. S. Travis, H. G. Schroter & Ernst Homburg (eds.), Determinants in the Evolution of the European Chemical Industry, 1900-1939: New Technologies, Political Frameworks, Markets and Companies. Dordrecht, Netherlands: pp. 199-214.
    On intellectual foundations that distinguished chemical engineering from other disciplines.
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  24. added 2019-07-02
    Making Light Work: Practices and Practitioners of Photometry.Sean F. Johnston - 1996 - History of Science 34 (3):273-302.
  25. added 2019-07-01
    Vaunting the Independent Amateur: Scientific American and the Representation of Lay Scientists.Sean F. Johnston - 2018 - Annals of Science 75 (2):97-119.
    This paper traces how media representations encouraged enthusiasts, youth and skilled volunteers to participate actively in science and technology during the twentieth century. It assesses how distinctive discourses about scientific amateurs positioned them with respect to professionals in shifting political and cultural environments. In particular, the account assesses the seminal role of a periodical, Scientific American magazine, in shaping and championing an enduring vision of autonomous scientific enthusiasms. Between the 1920s and 1970s, editors Albert G. Ingalls and Clair L. Stong (...)
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  26. added 2019-07-01
    Crowd-Sourced Science: Societal Engagement, Scientific Authority and Ethical Practice.Sean F. Johnston, Benjamin Franks & Sandy Whitelaw - 2017 - Journal of Information Ethics 26 (1):49-65.
    This paper discusses the implications for public participation in science opened by the sharing of information via electronic media. The ethical dimensions of information flow and control are linked to questions of autonomy, authority and appropriate exploitation of knowledge. It argues that, by lowering the boundaries that limit access and participation by wider active audiences, both scientific identity and practice are challenged in favor of extra-disciplinary and avocational communities such as scientific enthusiasts and lay experts. Reconfigurations of hierarchy, mediated by (...)
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  27. added 2019-07-01
    Holograms: A Cultural History.Sean F. Johnston - 2015 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Holograms have been in the public eye for over a half-century, but their influences have deeper cultural roots. No other visual experience is quite like interacting with holograms; no other cultural product melds the technological sublime with magic and optimism in quite the same way. As holograms have evolved, they have left their audiences alternately fascinated, bemused, inspired or indifferent. From expressions of high science to countercultural art to consumersecurity, holograms have represented modernity, magic and materialism. Their most pervasive impact (...)
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  28. added 2019-07-01
    The Neutron's Children: Nuclear Engineers and the Shaping of Identity.Sean F. Johnston - 2012 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    The first nuclear engineers emerged from the Manhattan Project in the USA, UK and Canada, but remained hidden behind security for a further decade. Cosseted and cloistered by their governments, they worked to explore applications of atomic energy at a handful of national labs. This unique bottom-up history traces how the identities of these unusually voiceless experts - forming a uniquely state-managed discipline - were shaped in the context of pre-war nuclear physics, wartime industrial management, post-war politics and utopian energy (...)
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  29. added 2019-07-01
    History of Science: A Beginner's Guide.Sean F. Johnston - 2009 - OneWorld.
    Weaving together intellectual history, philosophy, and social studies, Sean Johnston offers a unique appraisal of the history of science and the nature of this evolving discipline. Science is all-encompassing and new developments are usually mired in controversy; nevertheless, it is a driving force of the modern world. Based on its past, where might it lead us in the twenty-first century?
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  30. added 2019-07-01
    In Search of Space: Fourier Spectroscopy, 1950-1970.Sean F. Johnston - 2001 - In B. Joerges & T. Shinn (eds.), Instrumentation: Between Science, State and Industry, Sociology of the Sciences Yearbook. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer. pp. 121-141.
    In the large grey area between science and technology, specialisms emerge with associated specialists. But some specialisms remain ‘peripheral sciences’, never attaining the status of disciplines ensconced in universities, and their specialists do not become recognised professionals. A major social component of such side-lined sciences – one important grouping of techno-scientific workers – is the research-technology community. An important question concerning research-technology is to explain how the grouping survives without specialised disciplinary and professional affiliations. The case discussed illustrates the dynamics (...)
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  31. added 2019-07-01
    A History of Light and Colour Measurement: Science in the Shadows.Sean F. Johnston - 2001 - Bristol, UK: Institute of Physics Press.
    2003 Paul Bunge Prize of the Hans R. Jenemann Foundation for the History of Scientific Instruments Judging the brightness and color of light has long been contentious. Alternately described as impossible and routine, it was beset by problems both technical and social. How trustworthy could such measurements be? Was the best standard of intensity a gas lamp, an incandescent bulb, or a glowing pool of molten metal? And how much did the answers depend on the background of the specialist? A (...)
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  32. added 2019-06-14
    Truth and Reality in Social Constructivism.Howard Sankey & Geoffrey Bowker - 1993/1994 - Arena Journal 2:233-252.
    This is a co-authored dialogue which explores epistemological and metaphysical questions raised by a social constructivist approach to science.
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  33. added 2019-06-06
    Forensic Culture as Epistemic Culture: The Sociology of Forensic Science.Simon A. Cole - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (1):36-46.
    This paper explores whether we can interpret the notion of ‘forensic culture’ as something akin to what Knorr-Cetina called an ‘epistemic culture’. Can we speak of a ‘forensic culture’, and, if so, how is it similar to, or different from, other epistemic cultures that exist in what is conventionally called ‘science’? This question has important policy implications given the National Academy Science’s recent identification of ‘culture’ as one of the problems at the root of what it identified as ‘serious deficiencies’ (...)
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  34. added 2019-06-06
    Ships That Pass in the Night: Tacit Knowledge in Psychology and Sociology.Harry Collins & Arthur Reber - 2013 - Philosophia Scientiae 17 (3):135-154.
    Reber et Collins sont l’un et l’autre des chercheurs reconnus, respectivement en psychologie et en sociologie. Tous deux ont pour objet central d’intérêt l’analyse et l’investigation de la connaissance tacite. Pourtant, aucun d’eux n’a lu ou cité le travail de l’autre. Nous nous demandons ici comment cette proximité d’intérêt peut coexister avec cette ignorance. Pendant plusieurs mois, nous avons exploré les différences entre nos visions du monde, nos approches du sujet et les difficultés de l’interdisciplinarité. L’article est un résumé de (...)
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  35. added 2019-06-06
    Just Truth? Carefully Applying History, Philosophy and Sociology of Science to the Forensic Use of CCTV Images.Gary Edmond - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (1):80-91.
    Using as a case study the forensic comparison of images for purposes of identification, this essay considers how the history, philosophy and sociology of science might help courts to improve their responses to scientific and technical forms of expert opinion evidence in ways that are more consistent with legal system goals and values. It places an emphasis on the need for more sophisticated models of science and expertise that are capable of helping judges to identify sufficiently reliable types of expert (...)
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  36. added 2019-06-06
    Things and the Archives of Recent Sciences.Soraya de Chadarevian - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (4):634-638.
    With the interest in studying science as practice came an interest in the material artefacts and things that form part of scientific activities in the laboratory, the field, the classroom, or the political arena. This shift in interest in connection with new modes of knowledge production raises new questions regarding the “archive” of science: what should be preserved and where to make it possible to reconstruct scientific practices in the desired detail? While digital media may be able to bridge some (...)
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  37. added 2019-06-06
    “Michael Polanyi and the Social Construction of Science”.Mary Jo Nye - 2012 - Tradition and Discovery 39 (1):7-17.
    Scholars in the field of social studies of science marked the year 2012 as the 50th anniversary of the publication of Thomas S. Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Kuhn’s book is routinely cited as the beginning of a new intellectual movement that jettisoned logical and empiricist accounts of scientific progress in favor of sociological and psychological explanations of scientific practice. In contrast, this essay argues that the roots of the social construction of science lie earlier, in the 1930s, in (...)
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  38. added 2019-06-06
    Ciencia y acción. [REVIEW]Armando Menéndez Viso - 2011 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 26 (1):96-99.
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  39. added 2019-06-06
    Milosz and Merton at the Metropolis: The Corn of Wheat Bears Fruit in Second Space.Paul J. Contino - 2011 - Renascence 63 (3):177-187.
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  40. added 2019-06-06
    The Ethos of Modern Science and the "Religious Melting Pot": About the Topicality of Merton's Thesis.Constantin Stoenescu - 2011 - Cultura 8 (2):127-142.
    My aim in this paper is to discuss the topicality of Merton’s thesis with a twofold meaning: as an idea which has its own place in the sociology of science and as an idea which is currently in its area of research. Merton asserts that the development of science in 17th century England was aided by the Puritan ethic. This does not means that science was caused by Puritanism, but only that Puritanism provided major support for the scientific activity. Because (...)
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  41. added 2019-06-06
    Asceticism in the Writings of Thomas Merton.Ross Labrie - 2010 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 13 (1):160-181.
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  42. added 2019-06-06
    Alan Sokal, Beyond the Hoax: Science, Philosophy and Culture. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. Pp. Xxi+465. ISBN 978-0-19-923920-7. £20.00 .Sophie Roux , Retours Sur l'Affaire Sokal. Paris: L'Harmattan, 2007. Pp. X+190. ISBN 978-2-296-02389-5. €17.50. [REVIEW]Steve Fuller - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Science 42 (3):442.
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  43. added 2019-06-06
    Massimo Mazzotti , Knowledge as Social Order: Rethinking the Sociology of Barry Barnes. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008. Pp. Xi+184. ISBN 978-0-7546-4863-5. £50.00. [REVIEW]Snait Gissis - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Science 42 (3):445.
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  44. added 2019-06-06
    Los límites del principio de indeterminación radical en Latour y el giro político de su filosofía de la ciencia.Paloma García Díaz - 2008 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 23 (3):319-336.
    Este artículo explora los artilugios conceptuales que utiliza la teoría de Bruno Latour para comprender y explicar la realidad natural y social. Asimismo, se exponen cuáles son los límites a su principio de “indeterminación radical” o principio de simetría generalizado. Este análisis muestra la posibilidad de un estudio normativo de la realidad social y tecnocientífica compatible con la evolución que se encuentra en el mismo Latour respecto del significado y funcíon políticos de la ciencia.This article explores the conceptual tools which (...)
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  45. added 2019-06-06
    Edward J. Hackett, Olga Amsterdamska, Michael Lynch and Judy Wajcman The Handbook of Science and Technology Studies, Third Edition. Cambridge, MA and London: MIT Press, 2007. Pp. Xiv+1065. ISBN 978-0-262-08364-5. £35.95. [REVIEW]Jesse Richmond - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Science 41 (4):628.
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  46. added 2019-06-06
    David Knight, Public Understanding of Science: A History of Communicating Scientific Ideas. Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2006. Pp. Viii+232. ISBN 0-415-20638-3. £65.00. [REVIEW]James Secord - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Science 41 (1):144-145.
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  47. added 2019-06-06
    Domination Revisited: From the French Critical Sociology of the 1970s to Present-Day Pragmatic Sociology.Luc Boltanski - 2008 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 29 (1):27-70.
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  48. added 2019-06-06
    Ronald E. Doel and Thomas Söderqvist The Historiography of Contemporary Science, Technology, and Medicine: Writing Recent Science. London and New York: Routledge, 2006. Pp. Xv+313. ISBN 0-415-39142-3. £80.00. [REVIEW]Soraya de Chadarevian - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Science 41 (1):127-129.
  49. added 2019-06-06
    Concepts, Anomalies and Reality: A Response to Bloor and Fehér.Stephen Kemp - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):241-253.
    In this article I respond to the defences of the Strong Programme put forward by David Bloor and Márta Fehér in this issue. I dispute the claim that it is attention to only limited parts of the Strong Programme framework that allows me to argue that this approach: leads to weak idealism, undermines the idea that theories have varying levels of instrumental success, and challenges the theoretical claims of scientific actors. Rather, I argue that these problematic positions are entailed by (...)
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  50. added 2019-06-06
    Ideals and Monisms: Recent Criticisms of the Strong Programme in the Sociology of Knowledge.David Bloor - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):210-234.
    I offer a reply to criticisms of the Strong Programme presented by Stephen Kemp who develops some new lines of argument that focus on the ‘monism’ of the programme. He says the programme should be rejected for three reasons. First, because it embodies ‘weak idealism’, that is, its supporters effectively sever the link between language and the world. Second, it challenges the reasons that scientists offer in explanation of their own beliefs. Third, it destroys the distinction between successful and unsuccessful (...)
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