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  1. added 2020-05-24
    Socratic Appetites as Plotinian Reflectors: A New Interpretation of Plotinus's Socratic Intellectualism.Brian Lightbody - 2020 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):91-115.
    Enneads I: 8.14 poses significant problems for scholars working in the Plotinian secondary literature. In that passage, Plotinus gives the impression that the body and not the soul is causally responsible for vice. The difficulty is that in many other sections of the same text, Plotinus makes it abundantly clear that the body, as matter, is a mere privation of being and therefore represents the lowest rung on the proverbial metaphysical ladder. A crucial aspect to Plotinus’s emanationism, however, is that (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-21
    Socratic Citizenship.Dana Villa - 2003 - Political Theory 31 (6):888-891.
  3. added 2020-05-17
    Book Review: Why Plato Wrote. [REVIEW]George Klosko - 2013 - Political Theory 41 (2):343-346.
  4. added 2020-05-17
    III. The Philosophy of the Particular and the Universality of the City: Socrates' Education of Euthyphro.Arlene W. Saxonhouse - 1988 - Political Theory 16 (2):281-299.
  5. added 2020-05-17
    II. Illegal Actions, Universal Maxims, and the Duty To Obey the Law: The Case for Civil Authority in the Crito.Daniel M. Farrell - 1978 - Political Theory 6 (2):173-189.
  6. added 2020-05-08
    Pan demos Alla ricerca di un nuovo pensiero.Donato Santarcangelo - 2020 - Dialoghi Mediterranei.
  7. added 2020-05-03
    Ronna Burger, Aristotle’s Dialogue with Socrates. [REVIEW]Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2010 - Rivista di Filosofia 101 (1):119-120.
    In order to understand the Gricean "logic of conversation" that underlies the Nicomachean Ethics, Burger believes it necessary to identify the audience to which the work is addressed: this is the audience of men and citizens who have received a good education, that is, have learned the virtues through habit, but have doubts about the content of the education received, that is, about the beautiful and the just. Aristotle proposes on the one hand to give them reasons to defend and (...)
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  8. added 2020-04-22
    Xenophon's Socrates on Wisdom and Action.Joseph Bjelde - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly.
    Xenophon's Socrates, like Plato's, holds that wisdom comes with practical abilities. But influential interpretations of Xenophon's Socrates attribute to him a splintered view of wisdom, on which there is no wisdom simpliciter which is specially connected to all good actions. In this paper, I argue that a crucial text is significantly more problematic for the splintered view than hitherto appreciated, while the texts which are supposed to support the splintered view do not. But Xenophon's Socrates comes apart from Plato's in (...)
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  9. added 2020-04-18
    Philosophy as Self-Fashioning: Alexander Nehamas's Art of Living. [REVIEW]R. Lanier Anderson & Joshua Landy - 2001 - Diacritics 31 (1):25-54.
    Review of Alexander Nehamas, "The Art of Living: Socratic Reflections from Plato to Foucault".
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  10. added 2020-03-25
    Plato's Socrates and His Conception of Philosophy.Eric Brown - forthcoming - In Richard Kraut & David Ebrey (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed. Cambridge:
    This is a study of Plato's use of the character Socrates to model what philosophy is. The study focuses on the Apology, and finds that philosophy there is the love of wisdom, where wisdom is expertise about how to live, of the sort that only gods can fully have, and where Socrates loves wisdom in three ways, first by honoring wisdom as the gods' possession, testing human claims to it, second by pursuing wisdom, examining himself as he examines others, to (...)
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  11. added 2020-03-17
    A Troublesome Passage in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics Iii 5.Walter R. Ott - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):99-107.
    Pace much of the literature, I argue that Aristotle endorses what I call the ‘strong link thesis’: the claim that virtuous and vicious acts are voluntary just in case the character states from which they flow are voluntary. I trace the strong link thesis to Plato’s Laws, among other texts, and show how it functions in key arguments of both philosophers.
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  12. added 2020-02-12
    Kierkegaard and Socrates: A Study in Philosophy and Faith.Christopher A. P. Nelson - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 65 (1):53-57.
  13. added 2020-02-12
    Socrates: Ironist and Moral Philosopher.Nicholas White - 1995 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (1):237-242.
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  14. added 2020-02-12
    Socrates: Philosophy in Plato's Early Dialogues.T. H. Irwin - 1981 - Journal of Philosophy 78 (5):272-279.
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  15. added 2020-02-12
    Before and After Socrates.R. K. Hack - 1933 - Journal of Philosophy 30 (19):527-529.
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  16. added 2020-02-11
    Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Trial of Socrates.George Rudebusch - 2005 - Mind 114 (455):714-718.
  17. added 2020-02-11
    Plato's Progeny: How Plato and Socrates Still Captivate the Modern Mind.John R. Wallach - 2003 - Mind 112 (445):151-156.
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  18. added 2020-02-11
    Socratic Wisdom: The Model of Knowledge in Plato’s Early Dialogues.Alexander Nehamas - 2001 - Mind 110 (439):717-721.
  19. added 2020-02-02
    The Refutation of Gorgias: Notes on a Contradiction.Refik Güremen - 2017 - Peitho 8 (1):237-248.
    This paper claims that Socrates’ refutation of Gorgias in the eponymous dialogue is designed not to find out the truth about the nature of the art of rhetoric itself but to refute the master of rhetoric himself. I try to justify this claim by displaying some major contradictions between the conclusions reached at with Gorgias and those reached at with Polus. When these contradictions are taken into account, the discussion with Polus is to be seen as reflecting the genuine Socratic (...)
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  20. added 2019-12-13
    On the Date of Chaerephon’s Visit to Delphi.Justin Barney & Daniel W. Graham - 2016 - Phoenix 70:274-289.
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  21. added 2019-12-13
    The Importance of Understanding Each Other in Philosophy.Sebastian Sunday Grève - 2015 - Philosophy 90 (2):213-239.
    What is philosophy? How is it possible? This essay constitutes an attempt to contribute to a better understanding of what might be a good answer to either of these questions by reflecting on one particular characteristic of philosophy, specifically as it presents itself in the philosophical practice of Socrates, Plato and Wittgenstein. Throughout this essay, I conduct the systematic discussion of my topic in parallel lines with the historico-methodological comparison of my three main authors. First, I describe a certain neglected (...)
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  22. added 2019-11-20
    Differentiating Philosopher From Statesman According to Work and Worth.Jens Kristian Larsen - forthcoming - Polis.
    Plato’s Sophist and Statesman stand out from many other Platonic dialogues by at least two features. First, they do not raise a ti esti question about a single virtue or feature of something, but raise the questions what sophist, statesman, and philosopher are, how they differ from each other, and what worth each should be accorded. Second, a visitor from Elea, rather than Socrates, seeks to addressed these questions and does so by employing what is commonly referred to as the (...)
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  23. added 2019-11-20
    The Quarrel Between Sophistry and Philosophy.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2011 - Dissertation, University of Copenhagen
    This study presents a full-length interpretation of two Platonic dialogues, the Theaetetus and the Sophist. The reading pursues a dramatic motif which I believe runs through these dialogues, namely the confrontation of Socratic philosophy, as it is understood by Plato, with the practise of sophistry. I shall argue that a major point for Plato in these two dialogues is to examine and defend his own Socratic or dialectical understanding of philosophy against the sophistic claim that false opinions and statements are (...)
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  24. added 2019-10-18
    Nietzsche's Revaluation of Socrates.Christopher C. Raymond - 2019 - In Christopher Moore (ed.), Brill's Companion to the Reception of Socrates. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 837–80.
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  25. added 2019-10-10
    The Love of the Beloved (On Eros and Philotimia in Plato's *Symposium*).Jens Kristian Larsen - 2013 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 48 (1):74-85.
    In this paper I investigate the understanding of eros expressed in the speeches of Phaedrus and Agathon in Plato’s Symposium, two speeches often neglected in the literature. I argue that they contain crucial insights about the nature of eros that reappear in Diotima’s speech. Finally, I consider the relation of Socrates and Alcibiades in light of these insights, arguing that the figure of Alcibiades should be seen as a negative illustration of the notion of erotic education described by Diotima.
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  26. added 2019-09-15
    The Incognito of a Thief: Johannes Climacus and the Poetics of Self-Incrimination.Martijn Boven - 2019 - In Adam Buben, Eleanor Helms & Patrick Stokes (eds.), The Kierkegaardian Mind. London, UK: pp. 409-420.
    In this essay, I advance a reading of Philosophical Crumbs or a Crumb of Philosophy, published by Søren Kierkegaard under the pseudonym Johannes Climacus. I argue that this book is animated by a poetics of self-incrimination. Climacus keeps accusing himself of having stolen his words from someone else. In this way, he deliberately adopts the identity of a thief as an incognito. To understand this poetics of self-incrimination, I analyze the hypothetical thought-project that Climacus develops in an attempt to show (...)
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  27. added 2019-09-11
    On Socrates.Hope May - 2000 - Wadsworth/Thomson Learning.
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  28. added 2019-09-05
    The Practical Reformer: On Husserl’s Socrates.Daniele De Santis - 2019 - Husserl Studies 35 (2):131-148.
    The present essay offers a first, systematic reconstruction of Husserl’s understanding of Socrates’ philosophical position in the Ideengeschichte with a special focus on the Socratic method. Our goal is twofold. On the one hand, we aim to provide a clear presentation of the way in which Husserl himself conceives of the “beginning” of Western philosophy by tackling the specifically Socratic contribution to it. On the other hand, we will clarify in what sense, and to what extent, the assessment of Husserl’s (...)
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  29. added 2019-09-04
    Review of T. Penner and C. Rowe, "Plato's Lysis". [REVIEW]Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2006 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2006.
  30. added 2019-08-23
    Aristophanic Tragedy.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2017 - In Z. Giannopoulou & P. Destrée (eds.), The Cambridge Critical Guide to Plato’s Symposium. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 70-87.
    In this paper, I offer a new interpretation of Aristophanes’ speech in Plato’s Symposium. Though Plato deliberately draws attention to the significance of Aristophanes’ speech in relation to Diotima’s (205d-206a, 211d), it has received relatively little philosophical attention. Critics who discuss it typically treat it as a comic fable, of little philosophical merit (e.g. Guthrie 1975, Rowe 1998), or uncover in it an appealing and even romantic treatment of love that emphasizes the significance of human individuals as love-objects to be (...)
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  31. added 2019-07-10
    Formal Causes: Definition, Explanation, and Primacy in Socratic and Aristotelian Thought by Michael T. Ferejohn. [REVIEW]Christopher V. Mirus - 2015 - Review of Metaphysics 69 (1):132-134.
  32. added 2019-07-09
    The Socratic Dimension of Kierkegaard's Imitation.Wojciech T. Kaftański - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (4):599-611.
    This article reevaluates the origins of Kierkegaard’s concept of imitation. It challenges the general approach to the genealogy of the phenomenon in question, which privileges the influence of various religious traditions on the thinker and ignores his exposure to the non-Christian literature. I contend that a close reading of the Apology, the Sophist, the Republic, and the Phaedo alongside Kierkegaard’s texts from the so-called second authorship reveals in the dialogues of Plato the three crucial aspects of Kierkegaard’s concept of imitation, (...)
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  33. added 2019-07-03
    De quelques figures du silence dans l’œuvre de Platon.David Lévystone - 2018 - Revue de Théologie Et de Philosophie 150:49-67.
    On chercherait en vain dans l’œuvre de Platon des développements explicites sur le silence. Mais le génie littéraire de Platon lui fait une place, et la mise en scène des dialogues, comme les interactions des personnages, mettent en jeu différentes figures du silence par lesquelles se dévoilent d’autres aspects des réflexions socratico-platoniciennes sur le langage. Les silences du philosophe s’opposent, en effet, à ceux de ses interlocuteurs, autant que la pratique philosophique du dialogue aux discours sophistiques. Car le silence véritable (...)
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  34. added 2019-06-07
    The moral intellectualism of Plato’s Socrates.Oded Balaban - 2008 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 13 (1):1-14.
    Commentators do not take Socrates' theses in the Hippias Minor seriously. They believe it is an aporetic dialogue and even that Socrates does not mean what he says. Hence they are unable to understand the presuppositions behind Socrates' two interconnected theses: that those who do wrong and lie voluntarily are better than those who do wrong unintentionally, and that no one does wrong and lies voluntarily. Arguing that liars are better than the unenlightened, Socrates concludes that there are no liars. (...)
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  35. added 2019-06-07
    Elenchus fontium historiae urbanae, 3/1: Quellensammlung zur Frühgeschichte der österreichischen Stadt .Willibald Katzinger. [REVIEW]John Freed - 1994 - Speculum 69 (3):810-812.
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  36. added 2019-06-07
    Eine Vorplatonische Deutung des Sokratischen Eros: Der Dialog Aspasia des Sokratikers Aischines. [REVIEW]J. S. Morrison - 1971 - The Classical Review 21 (2):292-293.
  37. added 2019-06-07
    Elenchus Fontium Historiae, Urbanae. B. Diestelkamp, M. Martens, C. van de Kieft, B. Fritz.John Mundy - 1969 - Speculum 44 (3):460-461.
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  38. added 2019-06-07
    Socrates—Hero of Fiction. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1949 - The Classical Review 63 (1):18-19.
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  39. added 2019-06-06
    Men of Bronze: Hoplite Warfare in Ancient Greece. [REVIEW]Thomas Martin - 2014 - Polis 31 (1):187-190.
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  40. added 2019-06-06
    An Inconsistent Ado About Matters of No Consequence': Comic Turns in Plato's "Euthydemus.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2014 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (1):15-32.
    Scholarship on the Euthydemus has largely focused on the protreptic character of the Euthydemus—that is, the manner by which Socrates attempts to turn the young Cleinias toward philosophy. By focusing on the dramatic structure of the text, and above all its comic tenor, this article argues that it is Crito—he to whom Socrates tells his hilarious story of his encounter with the two sophist-brothers—who is the real object of Socrates’s protreptic speech.
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  41. added 2019-06-06
    Revisiting the Ironic Socrates: Eironeia and Socrates’ Narrative Commentary.Anne-Marie Schultz - 2012 - Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (1):23-31.
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  42. added 2019-06-06
    Xenophon.Vasiliki Zali - 2012 - American Journal of Philology 133 (1):164-167.
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  43. added 2019-06-06
    The Care‐of‐Self Ethic with Continual Reference to Socrates: Towards Ethical Self‐Management.Ghislain Deslandes - 2012 - Business Ethics 21 (4):325-338.
    ‘Have you ever taken sufficient care of yourselves?’ By asking the elite Athenian youth this question, Socrates implies that the liberation of self and the capacity to govern are inseparable. Drawing on the lectures given by Michel Foucault at the Collège de France in 1984 – only recently made available to the public – we show the consequences of the return to this ancient care‐of‐self ethic in the organizational context. After reviewing the contributions made to business ethics by these two (...)
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  44. added 2019-06-06
    Socratic Pedagogy: Perplexity, Humiliation, Shame and a Broken Egg.Peter Boghossian - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (7):710-720.
    This article addresses and rebuts the claim that the purpose of the Socratic method is to humiliate, shame, and perplex participants. It clarifies pedagogical and exegetical confusions surrounding the Socratic method, what the Socratic method is, what its epistemological ambitions are, and how the historical Socrates likely viewed it. First, this article explains the Socratic method; second, it clarifies a misunderstanding regarding Socrates' role in intentionally perplexing his interlocutors; third, it discusses two different types of perplexity and relates these to (...)
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  45. added 2019-06-06
    A Religious Revolution? How Socrates’ Theology Undermined the Practice of Sacrifice.Anna Lännström - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (2):261-274.
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  46. added 2019-06-06
    Is Socrates a Prophet? (In Light of the Views of His Contemporaries and the Main Commentators).Hossein Ghaffari - 2011 - Sophia 50 (3):391-411.
    Everybody acknowledges the importance of Socrates’ role and influence on the history of philosophy, as well as on the culture of humanity. He is also considered to be the first martyr of virtue and wisdom in human history. In spite of this, even though most Western commentators recognize the elevated meanings and high level of Socratic wisdom, they refuse to consider it to have a supra-human source and to be divine prophecy. In this article and through the analysis of Socrates’ (...)
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  47. added 2019-06-06
    Aristotle’s Dialogue with Socrates: On the Nicomachean Ethics. [REVIEW]James H. Nichols Jr - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):218-221.
  48. added 2019-06-06
    The Playful and the Serious: A Reading of Xenophon’s Symposium.Mark J. Thomas - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):263-278.
    In this paper I investigate the relationship between the serious and the playful elements in Socrates’ character as these unfold within the context of Xenophon’s Symposium. For the Greeks, the concept of value is attached to the meaning of seriousness, and this accounts for the natural preference for the serious over the playful. Despite the potential rivalry of the playful and philosophy, Socrates mixes the playful with the serious in such a way as to conceal their boundary. This mixing serves (...)
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  49. added 2019-06-06
    Socrates in the Underworld: On Plato’s Gorgias. [REVIEW]Gary Michael Atkinson - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):825-829.
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  50. added 2019-06-06
    From Modesty to Dynamite, From Socrates to Dionysus: Friedrich Nietzsche on “Intellectual Honesty”.Holger Zaborowski - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (2):337-356.
    This paper examines Nietzsche’s philosophical self-understanding and focuses particularly on the concept of intellectual honesty. It discusses, first, thewritings of his middle period, particularly Human, All Too Human, Daybreak, and The Gay Science, and analyses Nietzsche’s critique of religion, Christianity, andWestern philosophy and science. In so doing, it introduces his emphasis on the role of modesty and intellectual honesty as a key to understanding his middle philosophy. The paper then moves on to show that and why his later philosophical works (...)
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