Related categories

94 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 94
  1. A Response to Thorian Harris.Stephen C. Angle - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (3):397-400.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. World Humanities and Self-Reflection of Humanity: A Confucian-Neo-Confucian Perspective.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (4):476-494.
    This article presents and develops Zhu Xi's Neo-Confucian theory of heart-mind-will and human nature as the source and basis for the understanding of humanity. This article next shows how Kant and Confucius could be said to share the same vision of humanity in light of one particular historical connection between them. Finally, I have explored four forms of knowledge in light of a distinction between feeling and observation as well as their basic unity. This gives rise to our vision of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy. By Stephen C. Angle . (New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. Xvi, 293 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 978-0-19-538514-4; Paperback, ISBN 978-0199922239.).Suk Choi - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (4):616-620.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. A Reply to Stephen Angle.Thorian R. Harris - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (3):400-402.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy (Review).Thorian R. Harris - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (3):392-397.
  6. “There is Nothing More…Than Dressing and Eating”: Li Zhi 李贄 and the Child-Like Heart-Mind.Pauline C. Lee - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):63-81.
    Zhi 李贄, also named ( hao 號) Zhuowu 卓吾 (1527–1602), and argues that he articulates a coherent and compelling vision of a good life focused on the expression of genuine feelings distinctive to each individual. Through a study of literary texts and terms of art he refers to in his critical essay “On the Child-like Heart-mind” ( Tongxin Shuo 童心說), as well as the metaphors and images he fleshes out throughout his writings, I characterize Li’s ethical vision and show that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Religion and the Ritual of Public Discourse1.Warren G. Frisina - 2011 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (1):74 - 92.
    What role should religion play in public discourse? Not long ago Richard Rorty argued, in more than one place, that religion is a "conversation stopper" which polite people refer to only in private conversations. Religious believers complain, however, that this practice renders it impossible for them to participate in public discourse. They ask whether a democratic community is worthy of the name if it effectively forbids (by custom or legislation) a significant segment of its citizens from acknowledging and drawing upon (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Wu, Zhen 吳震: On Taizhou School 泰州學派研究: Beijing 北京: Zhongguo Renmin Daxue Chubanshe 中國人民大學出版社, 2009, 6+455 pages. [REVIEW]Liu Liangjian - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):571-573.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Reply to Stephen Angle.Justin Tiwald - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):241-243.
    A follow-up to Tiwald's book review of Angle's Sagehood.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10. Stephen C. Angle: Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009, Xvi + 293 Pages. [REVIEW]Justin Tiwald - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):231-235.
    Review of Stephen C. Angle's Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  11. Continuity of Heart-Mind and Things-Events: A Systematic Reconstruction of Neo-Confucian Epistemology.Haiming Wen - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (3):269 - 290.
    Many scholars argue that there is no epistemology in Chinese philosophy, or that an epistemological sensibility was not fully developed in Chinese thinking. This leads western audiences to mistakenly think that Chinese philosophy is not properly ?philosophical?. This paper argues that there is a great deal of discourse about understanding the world as a whole in ancient Chinese philosophy. Taking Song-ming Neo-Confucianism as an example, the author shows that most researchers do not uncover its philosophical advancement as it developed throughout (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Between Mind and Trace — A Research Into the Theories on Xin 心 (Mind) of Early Song Confucianism and Buddhism.Shiling Xiang - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (2):173-192.
    From Han Yu’s yuan Dao 原道 (retracing the Dao) to Ouyang Xiu’s lun ben 论本 (discussing the root), the conflicts arising from Confucianists’ rejection of Buddhism were focused on one point, namely, the examination of zhongxin suo shou 中心所守 (something kept in mind). The attitude towards the distinction between mind and trace, and the proper approach to erase the gap between emptiness and being, as well as that between the expedient and the true, became the major concerns unavoidable for various (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Angle, Stephen C. Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo‐Confucian Philosophy . New York: Oxford University Press, 2009 . Pp. 293. $74.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Erin M. Cline - 2010 - Ethics 120 (4):826-831.
  14. Taking on Proper Appearance and Putting It Into Practice: Two Different Systems of Effort in Song and Ming Neo-Confucianism. [REVIEW]Weixiang Ding - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (3):326-351.
    Both jianxing 践形 (taking on proper appearance) and jianxing 践行 (putting into practice) were concepts coined by Confucians before the Qin Dynasty. They largely referred to similar things. But because the Daxue 大学 ( Great Learning ) was listed as one of the Sishu 四书 (The Four Books) during the Song Dynasty, different explanations and trends in terms of the Great Learning resulted in taking on proper appearance and putting into practice becoming two different systems of efforts. The former formed (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Bol, Peter K., Neo-Confucianism in History: Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2008, Viii + 366 Pages.Philip J. Ivanhoe - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):471-475.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Dao Companion to Neo-Confucian Philosophy.John Makeham (ed.) - 2010 - Springer.
    This Companion is the first volume to provide a comprehensive introduction, in accessible English, to the Neo-Confucian philosophical thought of representative ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17. On Pleasure: A Reflection on Happiness From the Confucian and Daoist Perspectives.Chen Shaoming - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):179-195.
    This paper discusses the structural relationship between ideals on pleasure and pleasure as a human psychological phenomenon in Chinese thought. It describes the psychological phenomenon of pleasure, and compares different approaches by pre-Qin Confucian and Daoist scholars. It also analyzes its development in Song and Ming Confucianism. Finally, in the conclusion, the issue is transferred to a general understanding of happiness, so as to demonstrate the modern value of the classical ideological experience.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Review of Stephen C. Angle, Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy[REVIEW]Bryan W. van Norden - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (2).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Contemporary Chinese Studies of the Philosophy of Liu Zongzhou 劉宗周.Simon Man Ho Wong - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):225-232.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Li in East Asian Buddhism: One Approach From Plato's Parmenides.James Behuniak - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (1):31 – 49.
    In Plato's Parmenides , Socrates proposes a 'Day' analogy to express one possible model of part/whole relations. His analogy is swiftly rejected and replaced with another analogy, that of the 'Sail'. In this paper, it is argued that there is a profound difference between these two analogies and that the 'Day' represents a distinct way to think about part/whole relations. This way of thinking, I argue, is the standard way of thinking in East Asian Buddhism. Plato's 'Day' analogy can then (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Li and Qi in the Yijing.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (s1):73-100.
  22. The Zhou Li and Constitutionalism: A Southern Song Political Theory.Jaeyoon Song - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (3):424-438.
  23. The Formation, Development and Evolution of Neo-Confucianism — with a Focus on the Doctrine of “Stilling the Nature” in the Song Period.Renqiu Zhu - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):322-342.
    The formation of the discourse of Neo-Confucianism 1 in the Song period was a result of the interactions between many social and cultural trends. In the development of the Neo-Confucian discourse, the Cheng brothers (Cheng Hao and Cheng Yi) played key roles with their charismatic thoughts and impelling personalities, while Zhu Xi pushed Neo-Confucian thought and discourse to a pinnacle with his broad knowledge and precise reasoning. In the warm discussions and debates between different schools and thoughts, the Neo-Confucian discourse (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. The Diagram of the Supreme Pole and the Kabbalistic Tree.Martin Zwick - 2009 - Religion East and West (9):89-109.
    This paper discusses similarities of both form and meaning between two symbolic structures: the Diagram of the Supreme Pole of Song Neo-Confucianism and the Kabbalistic Tree of medieval Jewish mysticism. These similarities are remarkable in the light of the many differences that exist between Chinese and Judaic thought, which also manifest in the two symbols. Intercultural influence might account for the similarities, but there is no historical evidence for such influence. An alternative explanation would attribute the similarities to the ubiquity (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Neo-Confucianism in History.Peter Kees Bol - 2008 - Harvard University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  26. Philosophical Development in Late Ming and Early Qing.Chung-yi Cheng - 2008 - In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Xiang, Shiling 向世陵, the Diversification and Four Systems in Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism 宋明理學的分系與四系 Changsha 長沙: Hunan Daxue Chubanshe, 2006, 475 Pages. [REVIEW]Wen Haiming - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):111-113.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism (1) : From Cheng Yi to Zhu Xi.Shu-Hsien Liu - 2008 - In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Form, Principle, Pattern, or Coherence? Li in Chinese Philosophy.Brook Ziporyn - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (3):401–422.
    This article provides an overview of controversies in the history of Chinese philosophy concerning the diversity of meanings of the term Li , as well as the comparative issues raised in various attempts by modern Chinese and Western interpreters to come to terms with this diversity of meanings. Revisiting the earliest pre-philosophical uses of the term, an attempt is then made to synthesize the insights of previous interpreters and open up a new path for investigating its distinctive implications in classical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  30. Neo-Confucian Political Philosophy: The Cheng Brothers on Li (Propriety) as Political, Psychological, and Metaphysical.Yong Huang - 2007 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (2):217–238.
  31. Moral Agency and the Unity of the World: The Neo-Confucian Critique of "Vulgar Learning".Youngmin Kim - 2006 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (4):479-489.
  32. Guest Editorial.John Krummel - 2006 - Vera Lex 7 (1/2):1-6.
    Editorial to accompany the entire issue on natural law and Asian philosophy which I guest edited.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. The Ontologicalization of the Confucian Concept of Xin Xing: Zhou Lianxi’s Founding Contribution to the Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism. [REVIEW]Jinglin Li - 2006 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (2):204-221.
    The Confucian concept of "cheng" (integrity) emphasizes logical priority of value realization over "zhen shi' (reality or truth). Through value realization and the completion of being, zhenshi can be achieved. Cheng demonstrates the original unity of value and reality. Taking the concept of cheng as the core, Zhou Lianxi's philosophy interpreted yi Dao (the Dao of change), and integrated Yi Jing (The Book of Changes) and Zhong Yong (The Doctrine of the Mean). On the one hand, it ontologicalized the Confucian (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. On The Universal and Local Aspects of Confucianism.Chen Lai - 2005 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (1):79-91.
    To counter the tendency of making Confucianism "localized" and thereby turning Confucianism research into research of local social history, the author criticizes this tendency and thinks it is unilateral to emphasize or stress the importance of a small unit's locality, but ignore the oneness of the distribution of Confucianism and the universality of Confucian thought. The thesis emphasizes that the main schools of Confucianism in the Song and Ming Dynasties are all not local ones and cannot be reduced to reflections (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. Neo-Confucian Religiousness Vis-À-Vis Neoorthodox Protestantism.L. O. Ping-cheung - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (3):367–390.
  36. On Li Zhi’s Theory of Growing Up in Spirit.Junjiang Wang - 2005 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (1):92-101.
    The theory of growing up in spirit is the core of Li Zhi's thought. The theory attempts to get rid of the limit of the rigid ethical doctrine of Confucianism and to encourage growth in a helpful person for the benefit of the country, which demands both a free environment of society and enough courage and insight of the individual. At the same time, the criterion of growing up in spirit indicates the limitation of Li Zhi's thought. His free exploration, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Zhongguo Xian Dai Jia Zhi Guan de Chu Sheng Li Cheng: Cong Li Zhi Dao Dai Zhen.Genyou Wu - 2004 - Wuhan da Xue Chu Ban She.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Li Yong (1627-1705) and Epistemological Dimensions of Confucian Philosophy. [REVIEW]John Berthong - 2003 - International Studies in Philosophy 35 (4):164-165.
  39. Reciprocal Altruism and the Biological Basis of Ethics in Neo-Confucianism.Donald J. Munro - 2002 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):131-141.
  40. Review of Understanding Confucian Philosophy: Classical and Sung-Ming by Shu-Hsien Liu. [REVIEW]Chenyang Li - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (2):312-314.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. The Concepts of Dao and Li in Song—Ming Neo-Confucian Philosophy.Chen Lai - 1999 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 30 (4):9-24.
    My friends, what I intend to do here is not simply to present a thesis. Rather, I will follow the main subject of this seminar, namely "The Possibilities and Questions in the Teaching and Transmitting Chinese Philosophy," concentrating in this lecture on the core concepts of neo-Confucianism.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  42. Love Unto Death: Passion and Reason in Late Ming China.Vladimir Maliavin - 1999 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (3):265-294.
  43. Transformations of the Confucian Way.John H. Berthrong - 1998 - Westview Press.
    From its beginnings, Confucianism has vibrantly taught that each person is able to find the Way individually in service to the community and the world. For over 2,600 years, Confucianism has sustained a continual process of transformation and growth. In this comprehensive new work, John Berthrong examines the vitality and expansion of the Confucian tradition throughout East Asia and into the entire modern world.Confucianism has been credited with being the dominant social and intellectual force shaping the enduring civilizations of East (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  44. The Ways of Confucianism: Investigations in Chinese Philosophy. [REVIEW]Philip J. Ivanhoe - 1998 - International Philosophical Quarterly 38 (1):98-100.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. Understanding Confucian Philosophy: Classical and Sung-Ming.Shu-hsien Liu - 1998 - Greenwood Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  46. The Recluse of Loyang - Shao Yung and the Moral Evolution of Early Sung Thought. [REVIEW]Bernard Paul Sypniewski - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (2):263-267.
  47. On a Comprehensive Theory of Xing (Naturality) in Song-Ming Neo-Confucian Philosophy: A Critical and Integrative Development.Chung-ying Cheng - 1997 - Philosophy East and West 47 (1):33-46.
    The question of xing has received much attention in the revival of Neo-Confucian philosophy (called Contemporary Neo-Confucianism) in present-day Taiwan, Hong Kong, and China and among scholars of Chinese philosophy in the United States. It also has much to do with a critical consciousness of both the difference and the affinity between the Chinese philosophy of man and morality and the contemporary Western philosophy of human existence and moral virtues. The study of this has great meaning for the development of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48. Confucianism and Tokugawa Culture.Peter Nosco (ed.) - 1997 - University of Hawai'i Press.
    ONE INTRODUCTION: NEO-CONFUCIANISM AND TOKUGAWA DISCOURSE BY PETER NOSCO Modern scholarship on the intellectual history of the Tokugawa period ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49. American and Neo‐Confucian Potentials for World Philosophy.Wallace Gray - 1995 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (4):441-464.
    Though not deriving from European modernity at all, the Chinese tradition of Neo‐Confucianism bean many similarities to the American pragmatic tradition….
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. On the Metaphysical Foundations of Neo- and New Confucianism: Reflections on Lauren Pfister’s Essay on Religious Confucianism.Philip J. Ivanhoe - 1995 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (1):81-89.
1 — 50 / 94