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  1. Zen Sourcebook: Traditional Documents From China, Korea, and Japan.Stephen Addiss, Stanley Lombardo & Judith Roitman (eds.) - 2008 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    "Featuring a carefully selected collection of source documents, this tome includes traditional teaching tools from the Zen Buddhist traditions of China, Korea, and Japan, including texts created by women. The selections provide both a good feel for the varieties of Zen and an experience of its common core.... The texts are experiential teachings and include storytelling, poetry, autobiographies, catechisms, calligraphy, paintings, and koans. Contextual commentary prefaces each text. Wade-Giles transliteration is used, although Pinyin, Korean, Japanese, and Sanskrit terms are linked (...)
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Dōgen
  1. Introduction: ‘What is Japanese Philosophy’?Raji C. Steineck & Elena L. Lange - 2018 - In Raji C. Steineck, Ralph Weber, Robert H. Gassmann & Elena L. Lange (eds.), Concepts of Philosophy in Asia and the Islamic World, vol. 1: China and Japan. Boston, USA: Brill. pp. 459-481.
    This introductory chapter on concepts of Japanese philosophy and the concomitant approaches to this subject contains 1) a brief critical overview of the term's history and its impact on the definition of the field and 2) a short presentation of the ensuing chapters, which create a sustained dialogue on how to understand Japanese philosophy and how to delineate its his history.
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  2. A Zen Philosopher? – Notes on the Philosophical Reading of Dōgen's Shōbōgenzō.Raji C. Steineck - 2018 - In Raji C. Steineck, Elena L. Lange, Ralph Weber & Robert H. Gassmann (eds.), Concepts of Philosophy in Asia and the Islamic World, vol. 1: China and Japan. Boston, USA: Brill. pp. 577-606.
    This contribution argues that it is misleading to consider Dōgen (1200-1253) a philosopher, in spite of a strong reception of his thought in Japanese and Comparative philosophy since the early 20th century. Dōgen himself gives a decidedly parochial description of his own agenda, and that he considered non-Buddhist views and teachings unworthy of any consideration whatsoever. There are substantial differences between Dōgen's concept of the Buddha Way and philosophy as an open-ended and reasoned discourse on matters of fundamental human concern. (...)
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  3. 'Religion' and the Concept of the Buddha Way: Semantics of the Religious in Dōgen.Raji C. Steineck - 2018 - Asiatische Studien / Études Asiatiques 72 (1):177-206.
    In recent decades, the concept of religion, and specifically its application to non-Western historic cultural formations has come unter critical scrutiny. This paper applies the analysis of semantic fields to three works by the medieval Japanese Buddhist monk Dōgen (1200–1253), who came to be revered as founder of the still extant Sōtō school of Zen Buddhism. By putting his notion of the ‘Buddha Way’ (butsudō) into strong relief, it provides a basis for comparison with modern concepts of religion. The conclusion (...)
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  4. Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, and the Question of Nationalism.Steven Heine, James W. Heisig & John C. Maraldo - 1997 - Philosophy East and West 47 (3):439.
  5. Dogen: Enlightenment and Entanglement.David Putney - 1997 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 17:25.
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  6. Dogen and the Koan Tradition: A Tale of Two Shobogenzo TextsMaster Dogen's Shobogenzo, Book I.Robert Aitken Roshi, Steven Heine, Gudo Nishimura, Chodo Cross & Master Dogen - 1995 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 15:265.
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  7. Dogen/Heidegger/Dogen: A Review of "Dogen Studies" and "Existential and Ontological Dimensions of Time in Heidegger and Dogen"Dogen StudiesExistential and Ontological Dimensions of Time in Heidegger and Dogen. [REVIEW]Graham Parkes, William R. LaFleur & Steven Heine - 1987 - Philosophy East and West 37 (4):437.
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  8. 9. Dōgen’s “Truth”.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 85-118.
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  9. Reading Shamon Dōgen: A Tourist’s Guide.Steve Bein - 2017 - In Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 119-142.
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  10. 5. Shinran’s Compassion and Dōgen’s Compassion.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 61-71.
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  11. 2. Dōgen’s Period of Self-Cultivation.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 34-44.
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  12. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Origins and Possibilities.Andrei Laurentiu - 2008 - Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture.
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  13. Getting Back to Premodern Japan: Tanabe’s Reading of Dōgen.Ralf MuìˆLler - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 164-183.
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  14. The Idea of the Mirror in Dōgen and Nishida.Michel Dalissier - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 99-142.
    The image of the “mirror” (鏡kagami) appears frequently in the philosophical texts of Nishida Kitaro (西田幾多郎1870-1945), where it assumes various functions. Mirror references first occur in meditations on the philosophies of Josiah Royce (1855-1916) and Henri Bergson (1859-1941). The most fascinating evocation here corresponds to the idea of a “self-enlightening mirror”, used to probe the philosophical ground for self-illumination. This idea seems to point back to Buddhist meaning that intervenes in Japanese intellectual history. We take this as our warrant for (...)
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  15. Self and Other: A Parallel Between Dōgen and Nishida.Laurentiu Andrei - 2010 - In James W. Heisig & Rein Raud (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 175-189.
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  16. Negotiating the Divide of Death in Japanese Buddhism: Dōgen’s Difference.John Maraldo - 2010 - In James W. Heisig & Rein Raud (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 89-€“121.
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  17. Practicing Time: Time and Practice in Deleuze and Dōgen.Ott Margus & Allik Alari - 2010 - In James W. Heisig & Rein Raud (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 148-€“174.
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  18. Body-Mind and Buddha Nature: Dōgen’s Deeper Ecology.Parkes Graham - 2010 - In James W. Heisig & Rein Raud (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 122-€“147.
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  19. Watsuji’s Reading of Dōgen’s Shōbōgenzō.Ralf MuìˆLler - 2009 - In Raquel Bouso & James W. Heisig (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 6: Confluences and Cross-Currents. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 109-€“128.
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  20. Japanese Philosophy Abroad.Hori Victor & Curley Melissa Anne-Marie (eds.) - 2008 - Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture.
    The growing scholarship on the Kyoto School of Japanese Buddhist philosophy has brought it to the attention of more and more people in the West, but in the process, the Kyoto School has acquired a fixed identity. It is usually depicted as centered around three main figures—Nishida Kitarō, Tanabe Hajime and Nishitani Keiji—and concerned with the philosophy of nothingness. In fact, however, as the thirteen scholars in this volume show, the Kyoto School included several other members beside the inner circle (...)
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  21. Shedding Dōgen’s Light on Betweenness: What Watsuji Tetsurō’s Interpretation of the Shōbōgenzō Can Teach Us About His Ethics.Graham Mayeda - 2016 - In Takeshi Morisato (ed.), Critical Perspectives on Japanese Philosophy. Chisokudo Publications & Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. pp. 327-362.
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  22. Dōgen Zenji No Shisō-Teki Kenkyū 道元禅師の思想的研究 by Tsunoda Tairyū 角田泰隆. [REVIEW]Bolokan Eitan - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):274-277.
    Tsunoda Tairyū of Komazawa University is one of the foremost authorities on shūgaku 宗学, or “Sōtō theology,” in Japanese academia, and a leading philologist of Dōgen’s writings, in particular the Shōbōgenzō 正法眼蔵. Tsunoda’s ongoing investigation of Dōgen’s philosophy culminated in the year 2015 when his extensive study Dōgen Zenji no shisō-teki kenkyū 道元禅師の思想的研究 was published by Shunjūsha. Tsunoda opens by introducing the fundamental methodologies that constitute Sōtō theological scholarship. The first is sankyū 参究, or scholarship based on one’s faith in (...)
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  23. Re-Visioning Dōgen Kigen’s Attitude Toward the System in Considering the Concept of Aspiration and Just-Sitting Mediation.Eiji Suhara - 2016 - Journal of Buddhist Philosophy 2:187-213.
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  24. Orientational Meliorism in Dewey and Dōgen.Scott R. Stroud - 2007 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (1):185-215.
    In the present work, I constructively engage the thought of the American pragmatist John Dewey and the Zen Buddhist Dōmgen on moral cultivation. I argue that Dewey presents a useful notion of moral development and growth with a focus on attentiveness to one's situation, but I also note that he leaves out extended analysis of how one is to foster such an orientation. Turning to the writings of Dōmgen, I argue that Deweyan moral theory can be supplemented by the methods (...)
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  25. The Bodymind Experience in Japanese Buddhism: A Phenomenological Study of Kukai and Dogen.David Edward Shaner - 1987 - The Personalist Forum 3 (1):75-78.
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  26. Review of Did Dōgen Go to China? What He Wrote and When He Wrote It, by Steven Heine. [REVIEW]William Harmless - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (2):286-288.
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  27. Language Against Its Own Mystifications: Deconstruction in Nagarjuna and Dogen.David R. Loy - 1999 - Philosophy East and West 49 (3):245-260.
    Nāgārjuna and Dōgen point to many of the same Buddhist insights because they deconstruct the same type of dualities, mostly versions of our commonsense but delusive distinction between substance and attribute, subject and predicate. This is demonstrated by examining chapter 2 of the "Mūlamadhyamakakārikā" and Dōgen's transgression of traditional Buddhist teachings in his "Shōbōgenzō." Nonetheless, they reach quite different conclusions about the possibility of language expressing a "true" understanding of the world.
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  28. Review of Beyond Personal Identity: Dōgen, Nishida, and a Phenomenology of No-Self by Gereon Kopf. [REVIEW]Steven Heine - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (4):569-571.
  29. Review of Shōbōgenzō: Yui Butsu Yo Butsu [and] Shōji by Dōgen; Eido Shimano Rōshi; Charles Vacher. [REVIEW]Joan Stambaugh - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (2):320-321.
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  30. Review of Visions of Awakening Space and Time: Dōgen and the Lotus Sūtra by Taigen Dan Leighton. [REVIEW]Pamela D. Winfield - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (3):425-427.
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  31. Who Is Arguing About the Cat? Moral Action and Enlightenment According to Dogen.Douglas K. Mikkelson - 1997 - Philosophy East and West 47 (3):383-397.
    This essay is an analysis of Dōgen's commentary on "Nan-ch'üan's Cutting of the Cat" as found in section 1.6 of the Shōbōgenzō Zuimonki. It argues that Dōgen's conception of hishiryō is the starting point for understanding Dōgen's moral vision, and employs this idea in the interpretation of the passage.
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  32. Review of Dōgen's Extensive Record: A Translation of the "Eihei Kōroku" by Dōgen; Shohaku Okumura; Taigen Dan Leighton. [REVIEW]Christopher Ives - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (2):269-271.
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  33. The Epochal Theory of Time in Whitehead and Japanese Buddhism: An East-West Study of Whitehead, Dogen, and Nishida.Steve Odin - 1994 - Process Studies 23 (2):119-133.
  34. An Analysis of Dōgen’s “Casting Off Body and Mind”.Shigenori Nagatomo - 1987 - International Philosophical Quarterly 27 (3):227-242.
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  35. Dōgen, Deep Ecology, and the Ecological Self.Deane Curtin - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):195-213.
    A core project for deep ecologists is the reformulation of the concept of self. In searching for a more inclusive understanding of self, deep ecologists often look to Buddhist philosophy, and to the Japanese Buddhist philosopher Dōgen in particular, for inspiration. I argue that, while Dōgen does share a nondualist, nonanthropocentric framework with deep ecology, his phenomenology of the self is fundamentally at odds with the expanded Self found in the deep ecology literature. I suggest, though I do not fully (...)
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  36. Dōgen and the Unknown Knowns: The Practice of the Wild After the End of Nature.Jason M. Wirth - 2013 - Environmental Philosophy 10 (1):39-61.
    Thinkers like Slavoj Žižek and Tim Morton have heralded the end of our ideological constructions of nature, warning that popular “ecology” or the “natural” is just the latest opiate of the masses. Attempting to think what I call Nature after Nature, I turn to the Kamakura period Zen master Dōgen Eihei to explore the possibilities of thinking Nature in its non-ideological self-presentation or what Dōgen called “mountains and rivers.” I bring Dōgen into dialogue with his great champion, the American poet (...)
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  37. Kūkai and Dōgen as Exemplars of Ecological Engagement.Graham Parkes - 2013 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1 (1):85-110.
    Although the planet is currently facing an unprecedented array of environmental crises, those who are in a position to do something about them seem to be paralyzed and the general public apathetic. This pathological situation derives in part from a particular concep­tion of the human relationship to nature which is central to anthro­pocentric traditions of thought in the West, and which understands the human being as separate from, and superior to, all other beings in the natural world. Traditional East Asian (...)
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  38. Dōgen Kigen-Mystical RealistZen Master Dōgen: An Introduction with Selected WritingsDogen Kigen-Mystical RealistZen Master Dogen: An Introduction with Selected Writings.Thomas Cleary, Hee-Jin Kim, Dōgen Kigen, Yūhō Yokoi, Zen Master Dōgen, Dogen Kigen, Yuho Yokoi & Zen Master Dogen - 1978 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 98 (3):295.
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  39. The Buddha-Nature in Dōgen’s Shōbōgenzō.Takashi J. Kodera - 1977 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 4 (4).
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  40. Review Article: Ishii Shudo’s Contributions to Dogen Studies Examining Chinese Influences on the Kana and Kanbun Texts.Heine Steven - 2014 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 41 (2).
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  41. Review Of: Pamela D. Winfield, Icons and Iconoclasm in Japanese Buddhism: Kūkai and Dōgen on the Art of Enlightenment. [REVIEW]Eric Haruki Swanson - 2014 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 41 (2).
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  42. Cognition Embodied in Buddhist Philosophy—A Comparative Reflection of Dōgen and Heidegger.Hisaki Hashi - 2014 - Philosophy Study 4 (2).
  43. Ein Brief des Mamluken Sultans Qā’itbey an den Dogen von Venedig aus dem Jahre 1473.Sobhy Yanni Labib - 1957 - Der Islam: Journal of the History and Culture of the Middle East 32 (3):324-333.
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  44. Toward a Description of Dogen's Moral Virtues.Douglas K. Mikkelson - 2006 - Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (2):225-251.
    Revitalized interest in "the virtues" has affected the study of Buddhism in recent years, and in this regard we may benefit by focusing on the Zen Master Dōgen (1200-1253). Seeking to describe Dōgen's moral virtues, we might begin by a study of his primer, the "Shōbōgenzō" Zuimonki; a particularly efficacious template for this project would appear to be one provided by Edmund L. Pincoffs in his book "Quandaries and Virtues: Against Reductivism in Ethics". This "modus operandi" reveals Dōgen's exhortation of (...)
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  45. The Leap of Thinking.Carl Olson - 1981 - Philosophy Today 25 (1):55-62.
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  46. Dōgen: Textual and Historical Studies Ed. By Steven Heine.Eitan Bolokan - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (1):348-351.
    Dōgen: Textual and Historical Studies is an impressive volume that marks a significant leap forward in the study of Zen Master Eihei Dōgen, founder of the Japanese Sōtō School. Dōgen’s life and thought are closely examined in light of the wider historical and religious contexts of Song dynasty China and the Kamakura era in Japan. This collection offers a careful consideration of Dōgen’s rich literary legacy by examining his significance situated as he was at the historical crossroads between the Chinese (...)
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  47. Treasury of the True Dharma Eye: Zen Master Dogen’s Shobo Genzo Ed. By Kazuaki Tanahashi.Eitan Bolokan - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (4):1286-1288.
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  48. Dōgen’s Views on Practice and Realization and His Dream Encounter with Damei Fachang.Shūdō Ishi - 2015 - Journal of Buddhist Philosophy 1:193-212.
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  49. Painting Mountains and Rivers: Gary Snyder, Dōgen, and the Elemental Sutra of the Wild.Jason Martin Wirth - 2014 - Research in Phenomenology 44 (2):240-261.
    In this essay I hope to make some new contributions to the philosophical opening occasioned by John Sallis’ articulation of an “elementology” more broadly and by his turn to Guo Xi’s exquisite Song Dynasty shan-shui scroll painting, Early Spring more particularly. I do so by bringing the remarkable writings by the American poet and thinker Gary Snyder, especially in relationship to his reading of the great Kamakura Zen Master Eihei Dōgen, directly into the fray of contemporary Continental discourses on the (...)
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