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Sound

Edited by Casey O'Callaghan (Washington University in St. Louis)
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  1. Ernest T. Abdel-Massih, Sami Hanna & Naguib Greis (1975). Writing Arabic. A Linguistic Approach: From Sounds to Script. Journal of the American Oriental Society 95 (2):357.
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  2. Claude G. Antoine (1850). Pure Sounds Against Pure Immaterialism; or, That Sounds Are Not Pure Sensations.
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  3. S. Arkette (2004). Sounds Like City. Theory, Culture and Society 21 (1):159-168.
    Our cultural climate is increasingly dependent upon visual space. Media and communication for the most part are exemplified through television and the Internet. Aural space has, for the moment, become an ambient presence. The aim of this article is to develop a phenomenological approach to interpreting our sonic environment by drawing upon a range of sound-scape theorists. I will, in some cases, provide a counter-argument to established theses, and in doing so endeavour to open up fresh debate for future sonic (...)
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  4. D. E. Baier (1936). The Loudness of Complex Sounds. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (3):280.
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  5. Mark J. Blechner (1977). Left-Ear Advantage for Sounds Characterized by a Rapidly Varying Resonance Frequency. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 9 (5):363-366.
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  6. Stephanie Brandt (2011). The Sound In Between. Studia Philosophica 1.
    Taking the interface between the common consumer behaviourism and the given representative conditions of our surroundings as a phenomenological, but, nevertheless, a key issue of both, architectural discourse and practice, this talk is trying to evaluate the position of sound within this realm. Sound is becoming increasingly recognised and explored within theory and practice as it is, increasingly, affecting our spatial perceptions and everyday lives. This paper is an investigation into the notion of sound within the built environment, questioning the (...)
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  7. M. Bull (2004). Automobility and the Power of Sound. Theory, Culture and Society 21 (4-5):243-259.
    This article analyses the connections between forms of solitary automobile habitation and the use of mobile sound technologies in automobiles: the radio, cassette, sound system and mobile phone. It does this through an empirically informed analysis of automobile use. In doing so it re-evaluates our understanding of the occupation of space and place, arguing that traditional concepts of urban space have underestimated the active role that the users of these communication technologies might have in transforming the meaning of these spaces (...)
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  8. Pierre Cachia (1988). From Sound to Echo in Late Badīʿ LiteratureFrom Sound to Echo in Late Badi Literature. Journal of the American Oriental Society 108 (2):219.
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  9. H. B. Carlson (1940). A Simple, Inexpensive, and Portable Apparatus for Demonstrating the 'Phantom' Sound. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (3):337.
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  10. R. Casati, E. Di Bona & J. Dokic (2013). The Ockhamization of the Event Sources of Sound. Analysis 73 (3):462-466.
    There is one character too many in the triad sound, event source, thing source. As there are neither phenomenological nor metaphysical grounds for distinguishing sounds and sound sources, we propose to identify them.
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  11. Roberto Casati (2008). Sounds. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  12. Roberto Casati & Jérôme Dokic, La Philosophie du Son.
    We discuss the distinction between the sensory modalities; the metaphysics of sounds; and the structure of sound space. We defend a physicalist conception of sounds, without accepting the identification of sounds with sound-waves in the medium. Sounds, we hold, are events in resonating objects. We evaluate the two main accounts of orientation in perceptual space: relationism and absolutism. We then address Strawson's problem of whether the logical space of sounds could be spatial in the full sense of the term. In (...)
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  13. Roberto Casati & Jérôme Dokic, Philosophy of Sound, Ch. 3.
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  14. Roberto Casati & Jérôme Dokic, Philosophy of Sound, Ch. 2.
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  15. Roberto Casati & Jérôme Dokic, Philosophy of Sound, Ch. 1.
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  16. Marc Champagne (2015). Sound Reasoning : Prospects and Challenges of Current Acoustic Logics. Logica Universalis 9 (3):331-343.
    Building on the notational principles of C. S. Peirce’s graphical logic, Pietarinen has tried to develop a propositional logic unfolding in the medium of sound. Apart from its intrinsic interest, this project serves as a concrete test of logic’s range. However, I argue that Pietarinen’s inaugural proposal, while promising, has an important shortcoming, since it cannot portray double-negation without thereby portraying a contradiction.
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  17. Rey Chow & James Steintrager (2011). The Sense of Sound. Duke University Press.
    Sound has given rise to many rich theoretical reflections, but when compared to the study of images, the study of sound continues to be marginalized. How is the “sense” of sound constituted and elaborated linguistically, textually, technologically, phenomenologically, and geologically, as well as acoustically? How is sound grasped as an object? Considering sound both within and beyond the scope of the human senses, contributors from literature, film, music, philosophy, anthropology, media and communication, and science and technology studies address topics that (...)
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  18. Jonathan Cohen (2010). Sounds and Temporality. Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 5:303-320.
    What is the relationship between sounds and time? More specifically, is there something essentially or distinctively temporal about sounds that distinguishes them from, say, colors, shapes, odors, tastes, or other sensible qualities? And just what might this distinctive relation to time consist in? Apart from their independent interest, these issues have a number of important philosophical repercussions. First, if sounds are temporal in a way that other sensible qualities are not, then this would mean that standard lists of paradigm secondary (...)
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  19. Sam C. Coval (1963). Persons and Sounds. Philosophical Quarterly 13 (January):26-32.
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  20. Adam M. Croom (2014). Auditory Neuroscience: Making Sense of Sound. Musicae Scientiae: The Journal of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music 18:1-3.
  21. Silvia Dapiá & Guillermo Gregorio (1997). Throwing Sound Into Sounds. Semiotics:87-94.
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  22. R. C. Davis (1948). Responses to 'Meaningful' and 'Meaningless' Sounds. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (6):744.
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  23. Knight Dunlap (1904). Studies From the California Psychological Laboratory: Some Peculiarities of Fluctuating and of Inaudible Sounds. Psychological Review 11 (4-5):308-318.
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  24. Knight Dunlap, C. E. Galloway & Bertha Killen (1905). Some Peculiarities of Fluctuating and of Inaudible Sounds. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 2 (1):18-20.
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  25. Brian K. Etter (1994). The Sounds of the Ideal. The Owl of Minerva 26 (1):47-58.
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  26. Gunnar Fant (1976). Speech Sounds and Features. Foundations of Language 14 (4):597-600.
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  27. John Andrew Fisher (forthcoming). The Value of Natural Sounds. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
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  28. Gregory Fowler (2013). Against the Primary Sound Account of Echoes. Analysis 73 (3):466-473.
    I argue against the Primary Sound Account of Echoes (PSAE) – the view that an echo of a sound just is that sound. I then argue that if my case against PSAE is successful, distal theories of sound are false. The upshot of my arguments, if they succeed, is that distal theories are false. Towards the end, I show how some distal theories can be modified to avoid this conclusion and note some open questions to which the modified theories give (...)
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  29. Eleanor A. Gamble (1909). Minor Studies From the Psychological Laboratory of Wellesley College: Intensity as a Criterion in Estimating the Distance of Sounds. Psychological Review 16 (6):416-426.
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  30. Mark Grimshaw & Tom Garner (2015). Sonic Virtuality: Sound as Emergent Perception. Oxford University Press USA.
    In Sonic Virtuality: Sound as Emergent Perception, authors Mark Grimshaw and Tom Garner introduce a novel theory that positions sound within a framework of virtuality. Arguing against the acoustic or standard definition of sound as a sound wave, the book builds a case for a sonic aggregate as the virtual cloud of potentials created by perceived sound. The authors build on their recent work investigating the nature and perception of sound as used in computer games and virtual environments, and put (...)
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  31. A. Gritten (2012). Book Review: Sounds: A Philosophical Theory; Sounds and Perception: New Philosophical Essays. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (4):430-434.
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  32. Catherine Guastavino (forthcoming). Structure of Auditory Categories: The Case of Environmental Sounds. Cognition.
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  33. Bernard Gunther, Ira Friedlander & William Hopkins (1973). Sounds and Symbols. Collier Books.
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  34. Susanne Herrmann-Sinai (2009). Sounds Without the Mind? Versuch einer Bestimmung des Klangbegriffs. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 57 (6):885-906.
    A fundamental concept of a philosophy of music is that of sound. Any investigation of this concept has to be ontologically as well as epistemically adequate. The main proposition of the article is that sounds can only be understood ontologically if we take into consideration their main characteristic of being strictly shapeless and lacking content, an insight that we can learn from Kant. In contradiction to Kant, sounds can be epistemologically characterized as objects that can only be re-presented if the (...)
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  35. Friedrich Hirth (1908). Syllabary of Chinese Sounds. The Monist 18:158.
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  36. H. M. Hoenigswald & Kenneth L. Pike (1944). Phonetics. A Critical Analysis of Phonetic Theory and a Technic for the Practical Description of Sounds. Journal of the American Oriental Society 64 (3):151.
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  37. R. W. Husband (1934). Can an Eclectic Position Be Sound? Psychological Review 41 (4):368-380.
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  38. Don Ihde (2007). Listening and Voice. Phenomenologies of Sound. Suny Press.
    Listening and Voice is an updated and expanded edition of Don Ihde's groundbreaking 1976 classic in the study of sound.
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  39. Kazushi Ishihara, Kazunori Komatani, Tetsuya Ogata & Hiroshi G. Okuno (2005). Sound-Imitation Word Recognition for Environmental Sounds. Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 20:229-236.
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  40. Christine James (2005). Sonar Technology and Shifts in Environmental Ethics. Essays in Philosophy 6 (1).
    The history of sonar technology provides a fascinating case study for philosophers of science. During the first and second World Wars, sonar technology was primarily associated with activity on the part of the sonar technicians and researchers. Usually this activity is concerned with creation of sound waves under water, as in the classic “ping and echo”. The last fifteen years have seen a shift toward passive, ambient noise “acoustic daylight imaging” sonar. Along with this shift a new relationship has begun (...)
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  41. J. A. Judge (forthcoming). Does the ‘Missing Fundamental’ Require an Inferentialist Explanation? Topoi:1-11.
    In arbitrating between representational and relational theories of perception, perceptual illusions—cases in which a subject’s perceptual experience diverges from the way the world really is—constitute an important battleground. The debate has, however, been dominated by discussions of visual perception. In attempting to extend the debate to audition, it is appropriate to start by considering what is thought to be a key case of auditory illusion. I consider the phenomenon of the ‘missing fundamental’, as well as examining a notion that is (...)
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  42. Olli-Taavetti Kankkunen (2010). Listening to Sounds in Sonic Praxis. In Inga Rikandi (ed.), Mapping the Common Ground: Philosophical Perspectives on Finnish Music Education. Btj. pp. 114.
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  43. G. Kent Kedl (1980). Language: Sounds We Use to Communicate. Philosophical Investigations 3 (1):26-43.
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  44. P. Kerszberg (1999). The Sound of the Life-World. Continental Philosophy Review 32 (2):169-194.
    Husserl's investigations of internal time-consciousness take sound as the primary temporal object. However, in these investigations, the structure of the flux of temporal subjectivity is established to the detriment of the rich tonal content of sound. Just as Husserl has enlarged the significance of the spatial object of mathematical physics to include the historically-sedimented layers of its appearance, so the temporal object will receive additional intelligibility if the rich texture of musical sound is taken into consideration. Particularly useful for this (...)
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  45. Leszek Kołakowski & Aleksandra Rodzińska-Chojnowska (2005). Sounds of Many Waters. Dialogue and Universalism 15 (7):5-10.
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  46. J. Kulvicki (2008). Review: Casey O'Callaghan: Sounds: A Philosophical Theory. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (468):1112-1116.
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  47. John Kulvicki (2008). The Nature of Noise. Philosophers' Imprint 8 (11):1-16.
    There is a growing consensus in the philosophical literature that sounds differ rather profoundly from colors. Colors are qualities, while sounds are particulars of some sort or other, such as events or pressure waves. A key motivation for this is that sounds seem to be transient, to evolve over time, to begin and end, while colors seem like stable qualities of objects' surfaces. I argue that sounds are indeed, like colors, stable qualities of objects. Sounds are not transient, and they (...)
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  48. Barry Layton (1975). Differential Effects of Two Nonspeech Sounds on Phonemic Restoration. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 6 (5):487-490.
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  49. Jason Leddington (2014). What We Hear. In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Springer Studies in Brain and Mind.
    A longstanding philosophical tradition holds that the primary objects of hearing are sounds rather than sound sources. In this case, we hear sound sources by—or in virtue of—hearing their sounds. This paper argues that, on the contrary, we have good reason to believe that the primary objects of hearing are sound sources, and that the relationship between a sound and its source is much like the relationship between a color and its bearer. Just as we see objects in seeing their (...)
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  50. Alvin M. Liberman, Pierre C. Delattre, Louis J. Gerstman & Franklin S. Cooper (1956). Tempo of Frequency Change as a Cue for Distinguishing Classes of Speech Sounds. Journal of Experimental Psychology 52 (2):127.
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