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  1. Spinoza's Moral Philosophy.Stephen Anthony Biddle - 1980 - Dissertation, Bryn Mawr College
    Chapter Four uses the concept of an adequate moral theory to evaluate Spinoza's moral philosophy. After isolating four criteria of an adequate moral theory, I attempt to demonstrate that Spinoza's theory can competently meet these standards and that frequently his explanations are superior to the accounts of other moral philosophers. It is this competence in explaining essential elements of our moral experience that warrants a detailed examination of the premises on which Spinoza's moral theory rests. Such an examination must critically (...)
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  2. A Study of Spinoza's Ethics By Jonathan Bennett. [REVIEW]E. J. Bond - 1986 - Philosophy 61 (235):125-.
  3. Moreau, Pierre, Francois on Experience and Passion in Spinoza-Concepts Developed in a Recent Book and Seminar.R. Bordoli - 1996 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 51 (1):193-195.
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  4. Substantial Powers, Active Affects: The Intentionality of Objects.Levi R. Bryant - 2012 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 6 (4):529-543.
    What can Dungeons & Dragons teach us about the being of beings? This article argues that Dungeons & Dragons introduces us to a world composed of objects or entities, where the being of objects is defined not by their qualities, but rather by their powers, capacities or affects. Drawing on the thought of Spinoza, Deleuze and Molnar, objects are seen to be defined by what they can do or their capacities to act, such that qualities are effects of these acts. (...)
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  5. On Habit.Clare Carlisle - 2014 - Routledge.
    For Aristotle, excellence is not an act but a habit, and Hume regards habit as ‘the great guide of life’. However, for Proust habit is problematic: ‘if habit is a second nature, it prevents us from knowing our first.’ What is habit? Do habits turn us into machines or free us to do more creative things? Should religious faith be habitual? Does habit help or hinder the practice of philosophy? Why do Luther, Spinoza, Kant, Kierkegaard and Bergson all criticise habit? (...)
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  6. Raison, passions et conatus chez Spinoza.Juan-Vicente Cortés-Cuadra - 2017 - Revue des Sciences Philosophiques Et Théologiques 101 (3):405.
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  7. Choreographing Problems: Expressive Concepts in European Contemporary Dance.Bojana Cvejic - unknown
    This dissertation explores how a recent set of practices in contemporary choreography in Europe (1998 - 2007) give rise to distinctive concepts of its own, concepts that account for processes of making, performing, and attending choreographic performances. The concepts express problems that distinguish the creation of seven works examined here ('Self unfinished' and 'Untitled' by Xavier Le Roy, 'Weak dance strong questions' by Jonathan Burrows and Jan Ritesma, 'heatre-elevision' by Boris Charmatz, 'Nvbsl' by Eszter Salamon, '50/50' by Mette Ingvartsen, and (...)
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  8. Educating for Immortality: Spinoza and the Pedagogy of Gradual Existence.Johan Dahlbeck - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (3):347-365.
    This article begins with the question: What is it to live? It is argued that, from a Spinozistic perspective, to live is not an either/or kind of matter. Rather, it is something that inevitably comes in degrees. The idea is that through good education and proper training a person can learn to increase his or her degree of existence by acquiring more adequate ideas. This gradual qualitative enhancement of existence is an operationalization of Spinoza's quest for immortality of the mind. (...)
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  9. Spinoza's Metaphysical Psychology.Michael Della Rocca - 1996 - In Don Garrett (ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 192--266.
    This paper analyzes and evaluates Spinoza way of carrying out his naturalistic program in psychology. I begin by examining Spinoza’s general metaphysical doctrine according to which each thing strives to preserve itself. While this doctrine cannot be true in its unqualified form, it does receive some support from Spinoza’s views on the nature of complex individuals. I then explore the problematic way in which Spinoza applies the doctrine of self -preservation to human psychology. The paper goes on the investigate the (...)
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  10. Passion, State, and Progress: Spinoza and Mandeville on the Nature of Human Association.Douglas J. Den Uyl - 1987 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (3):369-395.
  11. Inleiding tot de affectleer van Spinoza.De H. Dijn - 1977 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 39:399-408.
    After a sketch of the metaphysical and anthropological foundations of Spinoza's theory of affects, the basic notions of this theory and their relations are investigated. A short discussion on the difference between Descartes and Spinoza as to how to control our passive affects ends this paper.
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  12. Freedom, Emotion, and Self-Subsistence. Ethics - 1969 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 12 (1-4):66 – 104.
    A set of basic static predicates, 'in itself, 'existing through itself, 'free', and others are taken to be (at least) extensionally equivalent, and some consequences are drawn in Parts A and ? of the paper. Part C introduces adequate causation and adequate conceiving as extensionally equivalent. The dynamism or activism of Spinoza is reflected in the reconstruction by equating action with causing, passion (passive emotion) with being caused. The relation between conceiving (understanding) and causing is narrowed down by introducing grasping (...)
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  13. The Knower and the Known.Guttorm Fløistad - 1970 - Man and World 3 (2):3-25.
    This paper is a presentation and discussion of Spinoza's view on the knower, or the mind, as an agent. The knower is on his view to be regarded as an active or generative complex cognitive experience. Imagination, reason and intuition are the cognitive principles. On account of their intrinsic relation to “the first law of nature”, that of selfpreservation, together with the thesis of the mind as constituted by ideas or knowledge, these principles function at the same time as moral (...)
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  14. La Laetitia en Spinoza.Jesús Ezquerra Gómez - 2003 - Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 28 (1):129-155.
    Laetitia in Spinoza has a twofold meaning: on the one hand is a passion, then is a product of inadecuates ideas and is associated with the first kind of knowledge (Imaginatio); on the other hand is expression of the Conatus and is an active affect (Fortitudo) connected with the third kind of knowledge (Scientia intuitiva). This second meaning confront us to a happines no human, frozen, abyssal which prefigure thinkers as Nietzsche, Bataille or lanchot.
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  15. Self-Preservation and Love in Spinoza's "Ethics".Anneliese Hoos - 2000 - Dissertation, Columbia University
    In my dissertation I explore the relationship between Spinoza's conception of self-preservation and the various forms of love discussed in the Ethics. After considering his early conception of love in the first of four chapters, I show how love, in all its forms, is related to Spinoza's conception of conatus or striving to persist in existence. In contrast to other interpretations of the Ethics, I emphasize the non-teleological component of Spinoza's mature philosophy and argue that love, in particular intellectual love, (...)
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  16. Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy.Susan James - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Passion and Action is an exploration of the role of the passions in seventeenth-century thought. Susan James offers fresh readings of a broad range of thinkers, including such canonical figures as Hobbes, Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza, Pascal, and Locke, and shows that a full understanding of their philosophies must take account of their interpretations of our affective life. This ground-breaking study throws new light upon the shaping of our ideas about the mind, knowledge, and action, and provides a historical context for (...)
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  17. Spinoza's Denial of Mind-Body Interaction and the Explanation of Human Action.Charles Jarrett - 1991 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 29 (4):465-485.
  18. Perfection and Desire: Spinoza on the Good.Matthew J. Kisner - 2010 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):97-117.
    While Spinoza claims that our good is both what increases our essential power and what helps us to satisfy our desires, he admits that people desire things that do not increase their power. This paper addresses this problem by arguing that Spinoza conceives of desires as expressions of our conatus , so that satisfying our desires necessarily increases our power and vice versa. This reading holds, in opposition to recent work, that Spinoza upholds a desire-satisfaction theory of the good, though (...)
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  19. Dreaming with Open Eyes.Julie R. Klein - 2003 - Idealistic Studies 33 (2/3):141-159.
    "Dreaming with open eyes" is a tagline for Spinoza's critique of Descartes; the dreams in question are principally those of volition and the active imagination. In this article, I compare the Cartesian theory of imagination as an active, but not fully rational, power of the mind and the Cartesian account of the volitional self to Spinoza's views. Descartes's own dreams and theories of dreaming are the focus of the first part of the article. Thereafter I examine Spinoza's critique of Descartes (...)
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  20. Spinoza on Action.Olli Koistinen - 2009 - In The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
  21. From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence.Michael Lebuffe - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Building interconnected readings of Spinoza's accounts of imagination, error, and desire, Michael LeBuffe defends a comprehensive interpretation of Spinoza's ...
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  22. Spinoza's Account of Akrasia.Martin Lin - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):395-414.
    : Perhaps the central problem which preoccupies Spinoza as a moral philosopher is the conflict between reason and passion. He belongs to a long tradition that sees the key to happiness and virtue as mastery and control by reason over the passions. This mastery, however, is hard won, as the passions often overwhelm its power and subvert its rule. When reason succumbs to passion, we act against our better judgment. Such action is often termed 'akratic'. Many commentators have complained that (...)
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  23. Teleology and Human Action in Spinoza.Martin Lin - 2006 - Philosophical Review 115 (3):317-354.
    Cover Date: July 2006.Source Info: 115(3), 317-354. Language: English. Journal Announcement: 41-2. Subject: ACTION; CAUSATION; METAPHYSICS; REPRESENTATION; TELEOLOGY. Subject Person: SPINOZA, BENEDICT DE (BARUCH). Update Code: 20130315.
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  24. Perfection, Power and the Passions in Spinoza and Leibniz.Brandon C. Look - 2007 - Revue Roumaine de la Philosophie 51 (1-2):21-38.
    In a short piece written most likely in the 1690s and given the title by Loemker of “On Wisdom,” Leibniz says the following: “...we see that happiness, pleasure, love, perfection, being, power, freedom, harmony, order, and beauty are all tied to each other, a truth which is rightly perceived by few.”1 Why is this? That is, why or how are these concepts tied to each other? And, why have so few understood this relation? Historians of philosophy are familiar with the (...)
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  25. Enlightenment and Action From Descartes to Kant: Passionate Thought.Michael Losonsky - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Kant believed that true enlightenment is the use of reason freely in public. This book systematicaaly traces the philosophical origins and development of the idea that the improvement of human understanding requires public activity. Michael Losonsky focuses on seventeenth-century discussions of the problem of irresolution and the closely connected theme of the role of volition in human belief formation. This involves a discussion of the work of Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, Spinoza and Leibniz. Challenging the traditional views of seventeenth-century philosophy and (...)
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  26. What Spinoza's View of Freedom Should Have Been.Frank Lucash - 1984 - Philosophy Research Archives 10:491-499.
    I argue that Spinoza’s view of freedom in Part 5 of the Ethics is not incompatible with his view of determinism in Part 1, as Kolakowski claims, nor is it compatible for the reasons Parkinson, Hampshire, and Naess offer. Spinoza did not work out a clear view of how freedom differs from determinism. Using various resources in Spinoza, I present a view of freedom which is different from both internal or atemporal determinism and external or temporal determinism. Freedom, in the (...)
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  27. Immanence et extériorité absolue.Mogens Lærke - 2009 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 134 (2):169-190.
    Cet article explore la conception spinozienne du rapport entre substance et mode en analysant les notions de cause de soi, de cause immanente et de puissance. Nous soutenons que la théorie spinozienne de la causalité constitue une tentative pour développer une ontologie relationnelle de la puissance dans laquelle toute dénomination intrinsèque est fondée sur une dénomination extrinsèque. Par opposition à une interprétation courante selon laquelle la substance de Spinoza est une sorte de grande monade dans laquelle toutes choses inhèrent comme (...)
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  28. Habitude, Connaissance Et Vertu Chez Spinoza.Syliane Malinowski-Charles - 2004 - Dialogue 43 (1):99.
    The goal of this article is to reveal the primal role played by in Spinoza's Ethics. Contrary to appearances, the concept is not linked only to passivity; it is an essential feature of the reinforcement of virtue toward wisdom. Considering that Laurent Bove's analyses of habit within the realm of imagination leave aside the links with adequate knowledge, this article offers an extension of his interpretation in a completely new direction. The new elements are, above all, a demonstration of the (...)
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  29. Spinoza on Destroying Passions with Reason.Colin Marshall - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (1):139-160.
    Spinoza claims we can control any passion by forming a more clear and distinct idea of it. The interpretive consensus is that Spinoza is either wrong or over-stating his view. I argue that Spinoza’s view is plausible and insightful. After breaking down Spinoza’s characterization of the relevant act, I consider four existing interpretations and conclude that each is unsatisfactory. I then consider a further problem for Spinoza: how his definitions of ‘action’ and ‘passion’ make room for passions becoming action. I (...)
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  30. Spinoza on the Problem of Akrasia.Eugene Marshall - 2010 - European Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):41-59.
    : Two common ways of explaining akrasia will be presented, one which focuses on strength of desire and the other which focuses on action issuing from practical judgment. Though each is intuitive in a certain way, they both fail as explanations of the most interesting cases of akrasia. Spinoza 's own thoughts on bondage and the affects follow, from which a Spinozist explanation of akrasia is constructed. This account is based in Spinoza 's mechanistic psychology of cognitive affects. Because Spinoza (...)
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  31. Spinoza and the problematic acquaintance with passions. [Spanish].Miguel Omar Masci - 2009 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 9:282-311.
    Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family:CalistoMT;} Spinoza’s deductive metaphysic system states a problem in regard to the knowledge of the passions. On the one hand, the passions are explained like body’s affections, but the soul has a mutilated and confused knowledge of (...)
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  32. Partem Totius Naturae Esse: Spinoza’s Alternative to the Mutual Incomprehension of Physicalism and Mentalism in Psychology.William Meehan - 2009 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 29 (1):47-59.
    Spinoza’s account of human agency is presented as a solution to the fundamental dichotomy between physicalism and mentalism in psychology. It is argued that this dichotomy originates in the 17th century with the Cartesian and Hobbesian responses to the collapse of the Scholastic synthesis. Spinoza’s view of nature as equally Mind and Body, and his understanding of efficient causality as grounded in a self-caused natural totality are described. Spinozism’s relative lack of influence on contemporary scientific culture is attributed to his (...)
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  33. Why Spinoza is Not an Eleatic Monist (Or Why Diversity Exists).Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2011 - In Philip Goff (ed.), Spinoza on Monism. Palgrave.
    “Why did God create the World?” is one of the traditional questions of theology. In the twentieth century this question was rephrased in a secularized manner as “Why is there something rather than nothing?” While creation - at least in its traditional, temporal, sense - has little place in Spinoza’s system, a variant of the same questions puts Spinoza’s system under significant pressure. According to Spinoza, God, or the substance, has infinitely many modes. This infinity of modes follow from the (...)
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  34. Spinoza's Theory on the Active and Passive Nature of Knowledge - Bibliography.Filippo Mignini - 1986 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 2:56.
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  35. Spinoza's Theory on the Active and Passive Nature of Knowledge - Résumé.Filippo Mignini - 1986 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 2:58.
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  36. Restricting Spinoza's Causal Axiom.John Morrison - 2015 - Philosophical Quarterly 65 (258):40-63.
    Spinoza's causal axiom is at the foundation of the Ethics. I motivate, develop and defend a new interpretation that I call the ‘causally restricted interpretation’. This interpretation solves several longstanding puzzles and helps us better understand Spinoza's arguments for some of his most famous doctrines, including his parallelism doctrine and his theory of sense perception. It also undermines a widespread view about the relationship between the three fundamental, undefined notions in Spinoza's metaphysics: causation, conception and inherence.
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  37. Freedom, Emotion, and Self-Subsistence.Arne Naess - 1969 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 12 (1-4):66 – 104.
    A set of basic static predicates, ?in itself, ?existing through itself, ?free?, and others are taken to be (at least) extensionally equivalent, and some consequences are drawn in Parts A and ? of the paper. Part C introduces adequate causation and adequate conceiving as extensionally equivalent. The dynamism or activism of Spinoza is reflected in the reconstruction by equating action with causing, passion (passive emotion) with being caused. The relation between conceiving (understanding) and causing is narrowed down by introducing grasping (...)
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  38. Russell, Spinoza and Desire [Review of Kenneth Blackwell, The Spinozistic Ethics of Bertrand Russell].Ibrahim Najjar - 1987 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 7 (2).
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  39. Emotion, Thought, and Therapy a Study of Hume, Spinoza, and Freud on Thought and Passion.Jerome Neu - 1974
  40. The Politics of Spinoza’s Vanishing Dichotomies.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 2010 - Political Theory 38 (1):131-141.
    Spinoza’s project of showing how the mind can be freed from its passive affects and the State from its divisive factions ultimately coincides with the aims announced in the subtitle of the Tractatus-Theologico-Politicus “to demonstrate that [the] freedom to philosophize does not endanger the piety and obedience required for civic peace.” 1 Both projects rest on a set of provisional isomorphic distinctions—between adequate and inadequate ideas, between reason and the imagination, between active and passive affects—that Spinoza proceeds to blur, and (...)
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  41. The Politics of Spinoza’s Vanishing Dichotomies.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 2010 - Political Theory 38 (1):131 - 141.
    Spinoza's project of showing how the mind can be freed from its passive affects and the State from its divisive factions (E IV.Appendix and V.Preface) ultimately coincides with the aims announced in the subtitle of the Tractatus-Theologico-Politicus (TTP) "to demonstrate that [the] freedom to philosophize does not endanger the piety and obedience required for civic peace." Both projects rest on a set of provisional isomorphic distinctions—between adequate and inadequate ideas, between reason and the imagination, between active and passive affects—that Spinoza (...)
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  42. The Significance of Action in Spinoza's Philosophy.Esther Orenstein - 1983 - Dissertation, New York University
    This thesis examines the concept and significance of action in Spinoza's philosophy. The analysis demonstrates that action is a fundamental Spinozistic concept, and a major strand in his philosophy. The concept of action is interwoven with all of Spinoza's major conceptions. The centrality of action is due to the fact that it endows Spinozistic philosophy with a dynamic character and binds together the whole universe in a web of Spinozistic determinism. Spinozistic action is traced in this thesis from substance, through (...)
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  43. Desire and Affect: Spinoza as Psychologist. [REVIEW]G. H. R. Parkinson - 2004 - International Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):371-373.
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  44. Spinoza on Causal Explanation of Action.Juhani Pffitarinen - 2003 - In Matti Sintonen, Petri Ylikoski & Kaarlo Miller (eds.), Realism in Action: Essays in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 137.
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  45. Renaturalizing the Individual with Borderline Personality Disorder.Amanda Plain - unknown
    Borderline Personality Disorder is among the most troubling Personality Disorders. Individuals with the disorder have exaggerated fears of abandonment, distorted self-identity and problems in interpersonal relationships, and are prone to self-abuse, suicide ideation and attempts, rage and aggression. Furthermore, these individuals have an exceptional aversion to admitting that these problematic behaviours are symptomatic of an underlying disorder, and therefore in accepting responsibility for their behaviour. Using a Spinozist approach, I analyze that we the public share in the responsibility for having (...)
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  46. Spinoza’s Materialist Ethics: The Education of Desire.Heidi M. Ravven - 1990 - International Studies in Philosophy 22 (3):59-78.
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  47. Spinoza on Emotion and Akrasia.Christiaan Remmelzwaal - unknown
    The objective of this doctoral dissertation is to interpret the explanation of akrasia that the Dutch philosopher Benedictus Spinoza gives in his work The Ethics. One is said to act acratically when one intentionally performs an action that one judges to be worse than another action which one believes one might perform instead. In order to interpret Spinoza’s explanation of akrasia, a large part of this dissertation investigates Spinoza’s theory of emotion. The first chapter is introductory and outlines Spinoza’s categorisation (...)
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  48. Error.Nicholas Rescher - 2006 - University of Pittsburgh Press.
    In _Error,_ Nicholas Rescher presents a fresh analysis of the occurrence, causality, and consequences of error in human thought, action, and evaluation. Rescher maintains that error-avoidance and truth-achievement are distinct but equally important factors for rational inquiry, and that error is inherent in the human cognitive process. He defines three main categories of error: cognitive ; practical ; and axiological, and articulates the factors that contribute to each. His discussion also provides a historical perspective on the treatment of error in (...)
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  49. Action in Spinoza's Account of Affectivity.Lee Rice - 1999 - In Yirmiyahu Yovel (ed.). Little Room Press. pp. 155--168.
    Despite the considerable attention given to Spinoza’s account of affectivity, especially in recent years, scant attention has been paid to the distinction between action and passion, or to the problems which it presents internally and externally. This essay offers a clarification and defense of Spinoza’s account of action and passion. A second theme is the behavioristic nature of Spinoza’s account of human affectivity. Despite the bad press which behaviorism is receiving these days, I argue that the behavioristic aspects of Spinoza’s (...)
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  50. L'analyse des passions dans la dissolution du corps politique : Spinoza et Hobbes.Julie Saada-Gendron - 2005 - Astérion 3.
    Les théories contractualistes de l’âge classique se fondent sur la conception d’un état de nature qui devient, à cause de ses contradictions internes, un état de guerre auquel il faut remédier par un artifice rationnel, le pacte. Alors même que ces contradictions sont issues des passions humaines, celles-ci semblent impensables dans le cadre purement juridique de ces théories, où ne sont analysés ni les mécanismes passionnels d’adhésion au politique, ni la menace de dissolution de l’État. Nous nous attachons à comparer (...)
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