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  1. Descartes and Spinoza on the Passions.Noa Naaman (ed.) - forthcoming - Cambridge University Press.
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  2. Core Affect Dynamics: Arousal as a Modulator of Valence.Valentina Petrolini & Marco Viola - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 11 (4):783-801.
    According to several researchers, core affect lies at the foundation of our affective lives and may be characterized as a consciously accessible state combining arousal and valence. The interaction between these two dimensions is still a matter of debate. In this paper we provide a novel hypothesis concerning their interaction, by arguing that subjective arousal levels modulate the experience of a stimulus’ affective quality. All things being equal, the higher the arousal, the more a given stimulus would be experienced as (...)
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  3. Descartes and Spinoza on the Primitive Passions.Lisa Shapiro - 2020 - In Noa Naaman-Zauderer (ed.), Freedom, Action, and Motivation in Spinoza's Ethics. Routledge Press. pp. 62-81.
    Motivating my discussion is a puzzle in Spinoza’s account of the primary affects – his shift away from adopting Descartes’s list of six primitive passions in the Short Treatise to the three primary affects in the Ethics. I lay out this puzzle in Section 1. In Section 2, I approach this puzzle by considering the taxonomy offered by Descartes of the basic or primitive passions. In considering Descartes, I will also briefly consider Aquinas’s view since Descartes positions himself as rejecting (...)
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  4. The Enigma of Spinoza's Amor Dei Intellectualis.Yitzhak Melamed - 2019 - In Noa Naaman-Zaudrer & Noa Naaman (eds.), Freedom, Action and Motivation in Spinoza’s Ethics. Routledge. pp. 222-238.
    The notion of divine love was essential to medieval Christian conceptions of God. Jewish thinkers, though, had a much more ambivalent attitude about this issue. While Maimonides was reluctant to ascribe love, or any other affect, to God, Gersonides and Crescas celebrated God’s love. Though Spinoza is clearly sympathetic to Maimonides’ rejection of divine love as anthropomorphism, he attributes love to God nevertheless, unfolding his notion of amor Dei intellectualis at the conclusion of his Ethics. But is this a legitimate (...)
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  5. Affekt Macht Netz. Auf dem Weg zu einer Sozialtheorie der Digitalen Gesellschaft (Hg. Breljak/ Mühlhoff/ Slaby).Rainer Mühlhoff, Anja Breljak & Jan Slaby (eds.) - 2019 - Bielefeld: transcript.
    -/- Shitstorms, Hate Speech oder virale Videos, die zum Klicken, Liken, Teilen bewegen: Die vernetzte Gesellschaft ist von Affekten getrieben und bringt selbst ganz neue Affekte hervor. -/- Die Beiträge des Bandes nehmen die medientechnologischen Entwicklungen unserer Zeit in den Blick und untersuchen sie aus der Perspektive einer kritischen Affekt- und Sozialphilosophie. Sie zeigen: Soziale Medien und digitale Plattformen sind nicht nur Räume des Austauschs, sie erschaffen Affektökonomien – und darin liegt auch ihre Macht. Indem sie neue Formen des sozialen (...)
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  6. Affective Societies: Key Concepts.Jan Slaby & Christian von Scheve (eds.) - 2019 - New York: Routledge.
    Affect and emotion have come to dominate discourse on social and political life in the mobile and networked societies of the early 21st century. This volume introduces a unique collection of essential concepts for theorizing and empirically investigating societies as Affective Societies. The concepts engender insights into the affective foundations of social coexistence and are indispensable to comprehend the many areas of conflict linked to emotion such as migration, political populism, or local and global inequalities. Each chapters provides historical orientation; (...)
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  7. (Non-)Belief in Things: Affect Theory and A New Literary Materialism.Neil Vallelly - 2019 - In Stephen Ahern (ed.), A Feel for the Text: Affect Theory and Literary Critical Practice. New York, NY, USA: pp. 45-63.
    This chapter argues that contemporary literary criticism suffers from a reflexive faith in things, conceived broadly as static objects that reflect wider political, social, and cultural practices. Literature is re-imagined here as an open-ended event that demands an immanent materialism in which distinctions between literary objects and human bodies no longer stand up. By reflecting on the ambiguous “thing-ness” of Shakespeare, Vallelly draws attention to the elusive nature of things in theatrical spaces, and explores how this enigmatic materiality can be (...)
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  8. Depression and the Emotions: An Argument for Cultivating Cheerfulness.Derek McAllister - 2018 - Philosophia 46 (3):771-784.
    In this paper, I offer an argument for cultivating cheerfulness as a remedy to sadness and other emotions, which, in turn, can provide some relief to certain cases of depression. My thesis has two tasks: first, to establish the link between cheerfulness and sadness, and second, to establish the link between sadness and depression. In the course of accomplishing the first task, I show that a remedy of cultivating cheerfulness to counter sadness is supported by philosophers as diverse as Thomas (...)
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  9. The Ontological Status of the Affects in Spinoza's Metaphysics: "Being in," "Affection of," and the Affirmation of Finitude.Avraham Rot - 2017 - Review of Metaphysics 71 (4).
    The article examines the relation between two kinds of ontological relations that hold together the building blocks of Spinoza’s metaphysics: “being in” and “affection of.” It argues that in order to speak of existence in a single sense, Spinoza equivocates on the notion of affection. On the one hand, substance is in itself in the same sense that every other existing thing is in substance. On the other hand, substance is not the affections of itself, affections of substance are not (...)
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  10. Spinoza, Ecology, and Immanent Ethics: Beside Moral Considerability.Oli Stephano - 2017 - Environmental Philosophy 14 (2):317-338.
    This paper develops an immanent ecological ethics that locates human flourishing within sustaining ecological relationships. I outline the features of an immanent ethics drawn from Spinoza, and indicate how this model addresses gaps left by approaches based in moral considerability. I argue that an immanent ecological ethics provides unique resources for contesting anthropogenic harm, by 1) shifting the focus from what qualifies as a moral subject to what bodies can or cannot do under particular relations, 2) emphasizing the constitutive role (...)
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  11. Is Spinoza’s Theory of Finite Mind Coherent? – Death, Affectivity and Epistemology in the Ethics.Oliver Istvan Toth - 2017 - The Concept of Affectivity in Early Modern Philosophy.
    In this paper I examine the question whether Spinoza can account for the necessity of death. I argue that he cannot because within his ethical intellectualist system the subject cannot understand the cause of her death, since by understanding it renders it harmless. Then, I argue that Spinoza could not solve this difficulties because of deeper commitments of his system. At the end I draw a historical parallel to the problem from medieval philosophy.
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  12. Spinoza on Emotion and Akrasia.Christiaan Remmelzwaal - 2016 - Dissertation, Université de Neuchatel
    The objective of this doctoral dissertation is to interpret the explanation of akrasia that the Dutch philosopher Benedictus Spinoza (1632-1677) gives in his work The Ethics. One is said to act acratically when one intentionally performs an action that one judges to be worse than another action which one believes one might perform instead. In order to interpret Spinoza’s explanation of akrasia, a large part of this dissertation investigates Spinoza’s theory of emotion. The first chapter is introductory and outlines Spinoza’s (...)
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  13. Affect, Desire, and Judgement in Spinoza's Account of Motivation.Justin Steinberg - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (1):67-87.
    Two priority problems frustrate our understanding of Spinoza on desire [cupiditas]. The first problem concerns the relationship between desire and the other two primary affects, joy [laetitia] and sadness [tristitia]. Desire seems to be the oddball of this troika, not only because, contrary to the very definition of an affect, desires do not themselves consist in changes in one's power of acting, but also because desire seems at once more and less basic than joy and sadness. The second problem concerns (...)
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  14. Frédéric Lordon. Willing Slaves of Capital: Spinoza and Marx on Desire., Trans., Gabriel Ash. London: Verso, 2014. 224 Pp. [REVIEW]Abhijeet Paul - 2015 - Critical Inquiry 41 (4):903-904.
  15. Affects and Activity in Leibniz's De Affectibus.Markku Roinila - 2015 - In Adrian Nita (ed.), Leibniz’s Metaphysics and Adoption of Substantial Forms: Between Continuity and Transformation. Springer. pp. 73-88.
    In this paper I will discuss the doctrine of substance which emerges from Leibniz’s unpublished early memoir De affectibus of 1679. The memoir marks a new stage in Leibniz’s views of the mind. The motivation for this change can be found in Leibniz’s rejection of the Cartesian theory of passion and action in the 1670s. His early Aristotelianism and some features of Cartesianism persisted to which Leibniz added influences from Hobbes and Spinoza. His nascent dynamical concept of substance is seemingly (...)
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  16. 2. Power, Affect, Knowledge: Nietzsche on Spinoza.David Wollenberg - 2015 - In Bartholomew Ryan, Maria Joao Mayer Branco & João Constancio (eds.), Nietzsche and the Problem of Subjectivity. De Gruyter. pp. 65-94.
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  17. Necessity and the Commands of Reason in the Ethics.Michael LeBuffe - 2014 - In Matthew Kisner & Andrew Youpa (eds.), Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory. pp. 197 - 220.
    This essay focuses on Spinoza’s claim that ideas of reason are necessary. While Spinoza understands necessity to imply that something cannot be otherwise, the author shows that Spinoza employs a narrower notion of necessity that applies only to some things, what LeBuffe describes as omnipresence: existing at all times and in all places. This account of the sense in which the ideas of reason are necessary makes evident that such ideas have especially strong motivational power. Our affects are more powerful (...)
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  18. The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza’s Science of the Mind by Eugene Marshall.Michael LeBuffe - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):846-847.
  19. Man Is A God to Man: How Human Beings Can Be Adequate Causes.Eugene Marshall - 2014 - In Matthew Kisner & Andrew Youpa (eds.), Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory. Oxford University Press.
  20. Pode o Conhecimento Dar Alguma Alegria? Uma Interpretação da "Melancolia I ", de Albrecht Dürer, a Partir da "Ética" de Spinoza.Marcos Ferreira de Paula - 2014 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 55 (130):597-618.
    Este artigo busca interpretar a gravura "Melancolia I", do renascentista alemão Albrecht Dürer, segundo o pano de fundo filosófico do pensamento de Spinoza. A ideia central é a de que, nessa gravura, haveria uma intuição artístico-filosófica pela qual Dürer foi levado a associar a tristeza melancólica à ideia de um conhecimento confuso e turvado pela imaginação. Tal intuição se completaria numa outra gravura, criada no mesmo ano, o "São Jerônimo em seu gabinete", na qual a melancolia do "homem de cultura" (...)
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  21. Spinoza Contra Phenomenology: French Rationalism From Cavaillès to Deleuze.Knox Peden - 2014 - Stanford University Press.
    Spinoza Contra Phenomenology fundamentally recasts the history of postwar French thought, typically presumed to have been driven by a critique of reason indebted to Nietzsche and Heidegger. Although the reception of phenomenology gave rise to many innovative developments in French philosophy, from existentialism to deconstruction, not everyone in France was pleased with this German import. This book recounts how a series of French philosophers used Spinoza to erect a bulwark against the nominally irrationalist tendencies of phenomenology. From its beginnings in (...)
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  22. The role of affects in the political thought of Spinoza.Vicente Serrano - 2014 - Ideas Y Valores 63 (154):31-57.
    Se analizan los más tradicionales aspectos vinculados a la teoría política spinozista, la teoría del contrato y la crítica de la religión, en estrecha relación con la Ética y con el tratamiento de las relaciones entre afectos e imaginación, que se considera como el núcleo de su pensamiento político. Se interpreta así la idea de conatus desde una doble dimensión, política y ontológica, cuya articulación con las otras categorías recogidas en la Ética, especialmente con relación a los afectos, ofrece una (...)
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  23. Eugene Marshall , The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza’s Science of the Mind . Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Alex Silverman - 2014 - Philosophy in Review 34 (5):251-253.
  24. The Susceptibility of Intuitive Knowledge to Akrasia in Spinoza's Ethical Thought.Sanem Soyarslan - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (4):725-747.
    Spinoza unequivocally states in the Ethics that intuitive knowledge is more powerful than reason. Nonetheless, it is not clear what exactly this greater power promises in the face of the passions. Does this mean that intuitive knowledge is not liable to akrasia? Ronald Sandler offers what, to my knowledge, is the only explicit answer to this question in recent Spinoza scholarship. According to Sandler, intuitive knowledge, unlike reason, is not susceptible to akrasia. This is because, intuitive knowledge enables the knower (...)
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  25. The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza's Science of the Mind.Eugene Marshall - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Eugene Marshall presents an original, systematic account of Spinoza's philosophy of mind, in which the mind is presented as an affective mechanism that, when rational, behaves as a spiritual automaton. He explores key themes in Spinoza's thought, and illuminates his philosophical and ethical project in a striking new way.
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  26. Nietzsche, Spinoza, and the Moral Affects.David Wollenberg - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (4):617-649.
    Friedrich Nietzsche was Less Well-Read in the history of philosophy than were many of his peers in the pantheon, whether Hegel before him or Heidegger after, but he was not for that reason any less hesitant to pronounce judgment on the worth of the other great philosophers: Plato was “boring”; Descartes was “superficial”; Hobbes, Hume, and Locke signify “a debasement and lowering of the concept of ‘philosophy’ for more than a century”; Kant was an “idiot” and a “catastrophic spider,” etc.1 (...)
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  27. Spinoza on Passions and Self—Knowledge: The Case of Pride.Lilli Alanen - 2012 - In Martin Pickavé & Lisa Shapiro (eds.), Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 234.
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  28. Critical Realism in the Personal Domain: Spinoza and Explanatory Critique of the Emotions.Martin Evenden - 2012 - Journal of Critical Realism 11 (2):163-187.
    Within critical realist circles, the development of knowledge in the natural and social domains has thus far been much stronger by comparison with its respective development within the personal domain. What I want to explore here is how knowledge can be positively used to have emancipatory effects at the level of the individual. The way in which we are able to achieve this is by coming to have what Spinoza calls more adequate ideas of ourselves, other beings, and our place (...)
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  29. Spinoza on the Passionate Dimension of Philosophical Reasoning.Susan James - 2012 - In Sabrina Ebbersmeyer (ed.), Emotional Minds. De Gruyter. pp. 71.
    Book synopsis: The thoroughly contemporary question of the relationship between emotion and reason was debated with such complexity by the philosophers of the 17th century that their concepts remain a source of inspiration for today’s research about the emotionality of the mind. The analyses of the works of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, and many other thinkers collected in this volume offer new insights into the diversity and significance of philosophical reflections about emotions during the early modern era. A focus is placed (...)
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  30. Spinoza on Human Freedom: Reason, Autonomy, and the Good Life.Michael LeBuffe - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):195 - 198.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 20, Issue 1, Page 195-198, January 2012.
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  31. Spinoza on Destroying Passions with Reason.Colin Marshall - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (1):139-160.
    Spinoza claims we can control any passion by forming a more clear and distinct idea of it. The interpretive consensus is that Spinoza is either wrong or over-stating his view. I argue that Spinoza’s view is plausible and insightful. After breaking down Spinoza’s characterization of the relevant act, I consider four existing interpretations and conclude that each is unsatisfactory. I then consider a further problem for Spinoza: how his definitions of ‘action’ and ‘passion’ make room for passions becoming action. I (...)
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  32. Spinoza on Human Freedom, by Matthew Kisner. [REVIEW]Eugene Marshall - 2012 - Mind 121 (484):1085-1088.
  33. Beyond Personal Feelings and Collective Emotions: Toward a Theory of Social Affect.R. Seyfert - 2012 - Theory, Culture and Society 29 (6):27-46.
    In the Sociology of Emotion and Affect Studies, affects are usually regarded as an aspect of human beings alone, or of impersonal or collective atmospheres. However, feelings and emotions are only specific cases of affectivity that require subjective inner selves, while the concept of ‘atmospheres’ fails to explain the singularity of each individual case. This article develops a theory of social affect that does not reduce affect to either personal feelings or collective emotions. First, I use a Spinozist understanding of (...)
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  34. Spinoza on Imagination and the Affects.Lisa Shapiro - 2012 - In Sabrina Ebbersmeyer (ed.), Emotional Minds. De Gruyter. pp. 89.
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  35. From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence. By Michael LeBuffe.Patrick Madigan - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (1):142-143.
  36. Rationalism Versus Subjective Experience: The Problem of the Two Minds in Spinoza.Syliane Malinowski-Charles - 2011 - In Smith Justin & Fraenkel Carlos (eds.), The Rationalists. Springer/Synthese. pp. 123--143.
  37. Natural Passions, Reason and Religious Emotion in Hobbes & Spinoza.Amy M. Schmitter - 2011 - In Ingolf U. Dalferth & Michael Rodgers (eds.), Passions and Passivity: Claremont Studies in Religion 2009. Mohr Siebeck. pp. 49-68.
  38. Animal Affects: Spinoza and the Frontiers of the Human.Hasana Sharp - 2011 - Journal for Critical Animal Studies 9 (1-2):48-68.
    Like any broad narrative about the history of ideas, this one involves a number of simplifications. My hope is that by taking a closer look Spinoza's notorious remarks on animals, we can understand better why it becomes especially urgent in this period as well as our own for philosophers to emphasize a distinction between human and nonhuman animals. In diagnosing the concerns that give rise to the desire to dismiss the independent purposes of animals, we may come to focus on (...)
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  39. From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence.Michael Lebuffe - 2010 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Spinoza rejects fundamental tenets of received morality, including the notions of Providence and free will. Yet he retains rich theories of good and evil, virtue, perfection, and freedom. Building interconnected readings of Spinoza's accounts of imagination, error, and desire, Michael LeBuffe defends a comprehensive interpretation of Spinoza's enlightened vision of human excellence. Spinoza holds that what is fundamental to human morality is the fact that we find things to be good or evil, not what we take those designations to mean. (...)
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  40. Review of Michael LeBuffe, From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence[REVIEW]Eugene Marshall - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (3).
  41. Spinoza on the Problem of Akrasia.Eugene Marshall - 2010 - European Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):41-59.
    : Two common ways of explaining akrasia will be presented, one which focuses on strength of desire and the other which focuses on action issuing from practical judgment. Though each is intuitive in a certain way, they both fail as explanations of the most interesting cases of akrasia. Spinoza 's own thoughts on bondage and the affects follow, from which a Spinozist explanation of akrasia is constructed. This account is based in Spinoza 's mechanistic psychology of cognitive affects. Because Spinoza (...)
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  42. From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence.Steven Nadler - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (5):947-950.
  43. The Politics of Spinoza’s Vanishing Dichotomies.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 2010 - Political Theory 38 (1):131-141.
    Spinoza’s project of showing how the mind can be freed from its passive affects and the State from its divisive factions ultimately coincides with the aims announced in the subtitle of the Tractatus-Theologico-Politicus “to demonstrate that [the] freedom to philosophize does not endanger the piety and obedience required for civic peace.”1 Both projects rest on a set of provisional isomorphic distinctions—between adequate and inadequate ideas, between reason and the imagination, between active and passive affects—that Spinoza proceeds to blur, and indeed (...)
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  44. Freedom, Slavery and the Passions.Susan James - 2009 - In Olli Koistinen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 223--241.
    Book synopsis: Since its publication in 1677, Spinoza’s Ethics has fascinated philosophers, novelists, and scientists alike. It is undoubtedly one of the most exciting and contested works of Western philosophy. Written in an austere, geometrical fashion, the work teaches us how we should live, ending with an ethics in which the only thing good in itself is understanding. Spinoza argues that only that which hinders us from understanding is bad and shows that those endowed with a human mind should devote (...)
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  45. Law and Sovereignty in Spinoza's Politics.Susan James - 2009 - In Moira Gatens (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Benedict Spinoza. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 211--28.
    Book synopsis: This volume brings together international scholars working at the intersection of Spinoza studies and critical and feminist philosophy. It is the first book-length study dedicated to the re-reading of Spinoza’s ethical and theologico-political works from a feminist perspective. The twelve outstanding chapters range over the entire field of Spinoza’s writings—metaphysical, political, theological, ethical, and psychological—drawing out the ways in which his philosophy presents a rich resource for the reconceptualization of friendship, sexuality, politics, and ethics in contemporary life. The (...)
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  46. The Anatomy of the Passions.Michael Lebuffe - 2009 - In Olli Koistinen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 188--222.
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  47. The Power of Reason in Spinoza.Martin Lin - 2009 - In Olli Koistinen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
  48. Spinoza and the Problematic Knowledge of the Passions.Miguel Omar Masci - 2009 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 9:282-311.
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  49. Review of Tammy Nyden-Bullock, Spinoza's Radical Cartesian Mind[REVIEW]Matthew J. Kisner - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (2).
  50. Spinoza’s Virtuous Passions.Matthew J. Kisner - 2008 - Review of Metaphysics 61 (4):759-783.