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  1. Spinoza on Passions and Self—Knowledge: The Case of Pride.Lilli Alanen - 2012 - In Martin Pickavé & Lisa Shapiro (eds.), Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 234.
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  2. Love, Perfection, and Power in Spinoza.Saverio Ansaldi - 2003 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 24 (2):59-74.
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  3. Nostri Corporis Affectus: Can an Affect in Spinoza Be 'of the Body'?Jean Marie Beyssade - 1999 - In Yirmiyahu Yovel (ed.). Little Room Press. pp. 113--128.
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  4. Conscience Et Connaissance Experientielle: Le Role des Affects Dans la Progression Ethique Chez Spinoza.Syliane Charles - 2002 - Dissertation, University of Ottawa (Canada)
    La double question a la source de ce travail est la suivante: comment le mecanisme du progres dans la connaissance se deploie-t-il exactement chez Spinoza, et pourquoi ce processus cognitif, relie aux idees qu'on possede, est-il en meme temps un processus ethique, relie a la joie et au bonheur? On constate que le champ de l'ethique n'est pas, a proprement parler, celui de la connaissance, mais celui du progres dans la connaissance, qui s'acheve par une conscience superieure de soi, de (...)
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  5. Le salut par les affects : La joie comme ressort du progrès éthique chez Spinoza.Syliane Charles - 2002 - Philosophiques 29 (1):73-87.
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  6. Affects Et Conscience Chez Spinoza.Syliane Malinowski Charles (ed.) - 2004 - Georg Olms.
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  7. Adequate Understanding of Inadequate Ideas: Power and Paradox in Spinoza's Cognitive Therapy.Thomas Cook - manuscript
    Spinoza shared with his contemporaries the conviction that the passions are, on the whole, unruly and destructive. A life of virtue requires that the passions be controlled, if not entirely vanquished, and the preferred means of imposing this control over the passions is via the power of reason. But there was little agreement in the seventeenth century about just what gives reason its strength and how its power can be brought to bear upon the wayward passions.
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  8. Spinoza's Causal Theory of the Affects.Donald Davidson - 1999 - In Yirmiahu Yovel (ed.). Little Room Press.
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  9. The Power of the Affects.Alejandro E. de Acosta - 2002 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Binghamton
    This dissertation concerns the affects, defined as bodily intensities and as pre-personal productive or creative feelings. Here, the affects are not simply passions; they precede the distinction between activity and passivity. These definitions correspond to the intuition expressed in philosophies of time and experience, that something is always happening in or to bodies. According to this intuition, events and processes always pertain to bodies, and what happens to bodies is experienced as affects: corporeal intensities, blocks of lived timespace, which can (...)
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  10. Expressionism in Philosophy: Spinoza.Gilles Deleuze - 1990 - MIT Press.
  11. Egoism and the Imitation of Affects in Spinoza.Michael Della Rocca - 2004 - In Yirmiahu Yovel (ed.), Spinoza on Reason and the Free Man. Little Room Press.
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  12. Spinoza, or, The Power of Desire.Camille DumiliÉ - 2003 - Pli 14.
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  13. Critical Realism in the Personal Domain: Spinoza and Explanatory Critique of the Emotions.Martin James Evenden - 2012 - Journal of Critical Realism 11 (2):163-187.
    Within critical realist circles, the development of knowledge in the natural and social domains has thus far been much stronger by comparison with its respective development within the personal domain. What I want to explore here is how knowledge can be positively used to have emancipatory effects at the level of the individual. The way in which we are able to achieve this is by coming to have what Spinoza calls more adequate ideas of ourselves, other beings, and our place (...)
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  14. Spinoza Et le Probleme de L'Akrasia: Un Aspect Neglige de l'Ordo Geometricus.Jacques Henri Gagnon - 2002 - Philosophiques 29 (1):57--71.
    The question of the weakness of the will, traditionally named akrasia after Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics (Book III), is tackled in part 4 of Spinoza’s Ethics. After a brief presentation of this problematic in the Ethics, the author shows how the geometrical order chosen by Spinoza to write his book constitutes a great part of the strategy put in place to concretely resolve this question.
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  15. Spinoza et le problème de l'akrasia : Un aspect négligé de l'ordo geometricus.Jacques-Henri Gagnon - 2002 - Philosophiques 29 (1):57-71.
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  16. Human Affects as Properties of Cognitions in Spinoza's Philosophical Psychotherapy.Amihud Gilead - 1999 - In Yirmiyahu Yovel (ed.). Little Room Press. pp. 169--181.
    The Spinozistic essence is the factor of individuation of a particular or individual thing. Affects or emotions are properties of an essence, which, under the attribute of thought, is an idea, i.e., cognition. Such essence is the human mind, which is the idea of a particular actual body. Since our emotions are properties of our cognitions, whether adequate or not, concerning the state of our body, which reflects nature as a whole in a particular way, I entitle Spinoza’s theory of (...)
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  17. The Affects as a Condition of Human Freedom in Spinoza's Ethics.Ursula Goldenbaum - 2004 - In Yirmiahu Yovel (ed.). Little Room Press.
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  18. La Laetitia en Spinoza.Jesús Ezquerra Gómez - 2003 - Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 28 (1):129-155.
    Laetitia in Spinoza has a twofold meaning: on the one hand is a passion, then is a product of inadecuates ideas and is associated with the first kind of knowledge (Imaginatio); on the other hand is expression of the Conatus and is an active affect (Fortitudo) connected with the third kind of knowledge (Scientia intuitiva). This second meaning confront us to a happines no human, frozen, abyssal which prefigure thinkers as Nietzsche, Bataille or lanchot.
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  19. Book Review:The Psychology and Ethics of Spinoza: A Study in the History and Logic of Ideas. David Bidney. [REVIEW]Marjorie Grene - 1940 - Ethics 50 (4):464-.
  20. Spinoza's Theory of Human Freedom.Stuart Hampshire - 1971 - The Monist 55 (4):554-566.
  21. Spinoza on the Passionate Dimension of Philosophical Reasoning.Susan James - 2012 - In Sabrina Ebbersmeyer (ed.), Emotional Minds. De Gruyter. pp. 71.
    Book synopsis: The thoroughly contemporary question of the relationship between emotion and reason was debated with such complexity by the philosophers of the 17th century that their concepts remain a source of inspiration for today’s research about the emotionality of the mind. The analyses of the works of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, and many other thinkers collected in this volume offer new insights into the diversity and significance of philosophical reflections about emotions during the early modern era. A focus is placed (...)
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  22. Freedom, Slavery, and the Passions.Susan James - 2009 - In Olli Koistinen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 223--241.
    Book synopsis: Since its publication in 1677, Spinoza’s Ethics has fascinated philosophers, novelists, and scientists alike. It is undoubtedly one of the most exciting and contested works of Western philosophy. Written in an austere, geometrical fashion, the work teaches us how we should live, ending with an ethics in which the only thing good in itself is understanding. Spinoza argues that only that which hinders us from understanding is bad and shows that those endowed with a human mind should devote (...)
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  23. Law and Sovereignty in Spinoza's Politics.Susan James - 2009 - In Moira Gatens (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Benedict Spinoza. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 211--28.
    Book synopsis: This volume brings together international scholars working at the intersection of Spinoza studies and critical and feminist philosophy. It is the first book-length study dedicated to the re-reading of Spinoza’s ethical and theologico-political works from a feminist perspective. The twelve outstanding chapters range over the entire field of Spinoza’s writings—metaphysical, political, theological, ethical, and psychological—drawing out the ways in which his philosophy presents a rich resource for the reconceptualization of friendship, sexuality, politics, and ethics in contemporary life. The (...)
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  24. Spinoza's Virtuous Passions.Matthew J. Kisner - 2008 - Review of Metaphysics 61 (4):759-783.
  25. Review of Tammy Nyden-Bullock, Spinoza's Radical Cartesian Mind[REVIEW]Matthew J. Kisner - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (2).
  26. Bennett on Spinoza's Philosophical Psychotherapy.Olli Koistinen - 1998 - Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy.
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  27. The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza’s Science of the Mind by Eugene Marshall.Michael LeBuffe - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):846-847.
  28. Spinoza on Human Freedom: Reason, Autonomy, and the Good Life.Michael LeBuffe - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):195 - 198.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 20, Issue 1, Page 195-198, January 2012.
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  29. From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence.Michael LeBuffe - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Building interconnected readings of Spinoza's accounts of imagination, error, and desire, Michael LeBuffe defends a comprehensive interpretation of Spinoza's ...
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  30. The Anatomy of the Passions.Michael Lebuffe - 2009 - In Olli Koistinen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 188--222.
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  31. Spinoza's Psychological Theory.Michael LeBuffe - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  32. The Power of Reason in Spinoza.Martin Lin - 2009 - In Olli Koistinen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
  33. Spinoza's Account of Akrasia.Martin Lin - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):395-414.
    : Perhaps the central problem which preoccupies Spinoza as a moral philosopher is the conflict between reason and passion. He belongs to a long tradition that sees the key to happiness and virtue as mastery and control by reason over the passions. This mastery, however, is hard won, as the passions often overwhelm its power and subvert its rule. When reason succumbs to passion, we act against our better judgment. Such action is often termed 'akratic'. Many commentators have complained that (...)
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  34. Perfection, Power and the Passions in Spinoza and Leibniz.Brandon C. Look - 2007 - Revue Roumaine de la Philosophie 51 (1-2):21-38.
    In a short piece written most likely in the 1690s and given the title by Loemker of “On Wisdom,” Leibniz says the following: “...we see that happiness, pleasure, love, perfection, being, power, freedom, harmony, order, and beauty are all tied to each other, a truth which is rightly perceived by few.”1 Why is this? That is, why or how are these concepts tied to each other? And, why have so few understood this relation? Historians of philosophy are familiar with the (...)
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  35. From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence. By Michael LeBuffe.Patrick Madigan - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (1):142-143.
  36. Rationalism Versus Subjective Experience: The Problem of the Two Minds in Spinoza.Syliane Malinowski-Charles - 2011 - In Smith Justin & Fraenkel Carlos (eds.), The Rationalists. Springer/Synthese. pp. 123--143.
  37. Affects et conscience chez Spinoza. L'automatisme dans le progres éthique.Syliane Malinowski-Charles - 2006 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 68 (3):662-662.
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  38. Spinoza on Destroying Passions with Reason.Colin Marshall - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (1):139-160.
    Spinoza claims we can control any passion by forming a more clear and distinct idea of it. The interpretive consensus is that Spinoza is either wrong or over-stating his view. I argue that Spinoza’s view is plausible and insightful. After breaking down Spinoza’s characterization of the relevant act, I consider four existing interpretations and conclude that each is unsatisfactory. I then consider a further problem for Spinoza: how his definitions of ‘action’ and ‘passion’ make room for passions becoming action. I (...)
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  39. Man Is A God to Man: How Human Beings Can Be Adequate Causes.Eugene Marshall - 2014 - In Matthew Kisner & Andrew Youpa (eds.), Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory. Oxford University Press.
  40. The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza's Science of the Mind.Eugene Marshall - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Eugene Marshall presents an original, systematic account of Spinoza's philosophy of mind, in which the mind is presented as an affective mechanism that, when rational, behaves as a spiritual automaton. He explores key themes in Spinoza's thought, and illuminates his philosophical and ethical project in a striking new way.
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  41. Review of Matthew Kisner, Spinoza on Human Freedom. [REVIEW]Eugene Marshall - 2013 - Mind 121:1085-88.
  42. Spinoza on the Problem of Akrasia.Eugene Marshall - 2010 - European Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):41-59.
    : Two common ways of explaining akrasia will be presented, one which focuses on strength of desire and the other which focuses on action issuing from practical judgment. Though each is intuitive in a certain way, they both fail as explanations of the most interesting cases of akrasia. Spinoza 's own thoughts on bondage and the affects follow, from which a Spinozist explanation of akrasia is constructed. This account is based in Spinoza 's mechanistic psychology of cognitive affects. Because Spinoza (...)
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  43. Review of Michael LeBuffe, From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence[REVIEW]Eugene Marshall - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (3).
  44. Spinoza's Cognitive Affects and Their Feel.Eugene Marshall - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):1 – 23.
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  45. Spinozas Metaphysics of Desire.L. In Martin - 2004 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 86 (1):21-55.
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  46. Spinoza and the Problematic Knowledge of the Passions.Miguel Omar Masci - 2008 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 9:282-311.
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  47. Spinoza's Amor Dei Intellectualis.Yitzhak Melamed - forthcoming - In Noa Naaman (ed.), Descartes and Spinoza on the Passions. Cambridge University Press.
    The notion of divine love was essential to medieval Christian conceptions of God. Jewish thinkers, though, had a much more ambivalent attitude about this issue. While Maimonides was reluctant to ascribe love, or any other affect, to God, Gersonides and Crescas celebrated God’s love. Though Spinoza is clearly sympathetic to Maimonides’ rejection of divine love as anthropomorphism, he attributes love to God nevertheless, unfolding his notion of amor Dei intellectualis at the conclusion of his Ethics. But is this a legitimate (...)
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  48. Descartes and Spinoza on the Passions.Noa Naaman (ed.) - forthcoming - Cambridge University Press.
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  49. From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence.Steven Nadler - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (5):947-950.
  50. Spinoza’s Radical Cartesian Mind.Tammy Nyden - 2007 - Continuum.
    Seventeenth-century Holland was a culture divided. Orthodox Calvinists, loyal to both scholastic philosophy and the quasi-monarchical House of Orange, saw their world turned upside down with the sudden death of Prince William II and no heir to take his place. The Republicans seized this opportunity to create a decentralized government favourable to Holland's trading interests and committed to religious and philosophical tolerance. The now ruling regent class, freshly trained in the new philosophy of Descartes, used it as a weapon to (...)
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