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  1. added 2020-05-20
    La modulation spinoziste. Pour se purifier de la philosophie.Jack Stetter - 2017 - In Timea Gyimesi (ed.), Modulation — Deleuze. Szeged, Hungary: JATE Press. pp. 49-58.
    Une analyse de la lecture de Spinoza comme penseur du "plan d'immanence pur" proposée par Deleuze dans son Qu'est-ce que la philosophie? (1991).
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  2. added 2020-05-08
    Spinoza and Judaism in the French Context: The Case of Milner's Le Sage Trompeur.Jack Stetter - 2020 - Modern Judaism - A Journal of Jewish Ideas and Experience 40 (2):227-255.
    Jean-Claude Milner’s Le sage trompeur (2013), a controversial recent piece of French Spinoza literature, remains regrettably understudied in the English-speaking world. Adopting Leo Strauss’ esoteric reading method, Milner alleges that Spinoza dissimulates his genuine analysis of the causes of the persecution and survival of the Jewish people within a brief “manifesto” found at the end of the Tractatus Theologico-Politicus (TTP), Chapter 3. According to Milner, Spinoza holds that the Jewish people themselves are responsible for the hatred of the Jewish people, (...)
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  3. added 2020-04-08
    Spinoza, Boyle, Galileo: Was Spinoza a Strict Mechanical Philosopher?Filip Buyse - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (1):45-64.
  4. added 2020-02-15
    Spinoza and Scholastic Philosophy.Emanuele Costa - forthcoming - In Yitzhak Y. Melamed (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Spinoza.
    In the first section of this chapter, I offer an overview of a selected list of Scholastic debates intersecting Spinoza's Cogitata Metaphysica. I highlight how Spinoza consciously intervenes in them, showing a certain awareness of the intricacies of Scholastic discourse. In this first section, I emphasize Spinoza’s interest in three specific problems: the issue of the division of being into “real being” and “being of reason”; the eternity of God and its distinction from duration; and, finally, God’s omnipresence. My aim (...)
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  5. added 2020-02-12
    Collective Imaginings: Spinoza, Past and Present.Sarah Donovan - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (2):175-177.
  6. added 2020-01-22
    Response to Readers of Spinoza and the Politics of Renaturalization.Hasana Sharp - 2012 - PhaenEx 7 (2):255-268.
    With five rich commentaries, it will be impossible for me to address all of the questions raised. So, I have selected out some questions that spoke immediately to me, and some questions that express concerns common to multiple commentators.
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  7. added 2019-10-02
    Spinoza’s Genealogical Critique of His Contemporaries’ Axiology.Benedict Rumbold - 2017 - Intellectual History Review 27 (4):543-560.
    Among Spinoza’s principal projects in the Ethics is his effort to “remove” certain metaethical prejudices from the minds of his readers, to “expose” them, as he has similar misconceptions about other matters, by submitting them to the “scrutiny of reason”. In this article, I consider the argumentative strategy Spinoza uses here – and its intellectual history – in depth. I argue that Spinoza’s method is best characterised as a genealogical analysis. As I recount, by Spinoza’s time of writing, these kinds (...)
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  8. added 2019-06-06
    Kants Anti-Spinozismus – Eine Antwort auf Omri Boehm.Thomas Wyrwich - 2014 - Kant-Studien 105 (1):113-124.
  9. added 2019-06-06
    Violenta Imperia Nemo Continuit Diu: Spinoza and the Revolutionary Laws of Human Nature.Hasana Sharp - 2013 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 34 (1):133-148.
    In what follows, I will substantiate the argument that there are at least two senses in which Spinoza’s principles support revolutionary change. I will begin with a quick survey of his concerns with the problem of insurrection. I will proceed to show that if political programs can be called revolutionary, insofar as freedom is their motivation and justification, and insofar as freedom implies an expansion of the scope of the general interest to the whole political body, Spinoza ought to be (...)
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  10. added 2019-06-06
    Difficulty Still Awaits: Kant, Spinoza, and the Threat of Theological Determinism.Kimberly Brewer & Eric Watkin - 2012 - Kant-Studien 103 (2):163-187.
    : In a short and much-neglected passage in the second Critique, Kant discusses the threat posed to human freedom by theological determinism. In this paper we present an interpretation of Kant’s conception of and response to this threat. Regarding his conception, we argue that he addresses two versions of the threat: either God causes appearances directly or he does so indirectly by causing things in themselves which in turn cause appearances. Kant’s response to the first version is that God cannot (...)
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  11. added 2019-06-06
    Beth Lord, Kant and Spinoza: Transcendental Idealism and Immanence From Jacobi to Deleuze, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, Pp. 214, Hbk, ISBN: 978-0-230-55297-5; £55-00. [REVIEW]Michael Fletcher - 2011 - Kantian Review 16 (3):482-488.
  12. added 2019-06-06
    The Rationalists: Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz. [REVIEW]Nicholas Jolley - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):339-341.
  13. added 2019-06-06
    Santayana and Spinoza On Philosophic Liberty: Bulletin of the Santayana Society.Doug Anderson - 2009 - Overheard in Seville 27 (27):9-17.
  14. added 2019-06-06
    Maimonides and Spinoza as Sources for Maimon's Solution of the “Problem Quid Juris” in Kant's Theory of Knowledge.Carlos Fraenkel - 2009 - Kant-Studien 100 (2):212-240.
    Maimon once described the philosophical project underlying his Essay on Transcendental Philosophy as an attempt “to unify Kantian philosophy with Spinozism”. But in the only reference to Spinoza in the Essay, he stresses that Spinoza was not the source of his argument. In this paper I will argue that, notwithstanding the disclaimer, Maimon's solution for the problems that in his view haunted Kant's theory of knowledge was indeed significantly influenced by Spinoza, as well as by the medieval Jewish Aristotelian Maimonides. (...)
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  15. added 2019-06-06
    “Tumultuous Combinations”: Transindividuality in Adam Smith and Spinoza.Warren Montag - 2007 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 28 (1):117-158.
  16. added 2019-06-06
    Deleuze Becoming Nietzsche Becoming Spinoza Becoming Deleuze: Toward a Politics of Immanence.Alan D. Schrift - 2006 - Philosophy Today 50 (Supplement):187-194.
  17. added 2019-06-06
    Aristotle and Descartes in Spinoza’s Approach to Matter and Body.Julie R. Klein - 2005 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 26 (2):157-176.
    Considered in its seventeenth-century context, Spinoza’s way of thinking about substance and nature is striking for its simultaneous refusal of Cartesian dualism and Hobbesian materialism. Spinoza knew both thinkers’ work well, yet sided with neither. Where Descartes divides substance into thinking and extended substance, and where Hobbes reduces all things to body, Spinoza espouses what is best called a double-aspect or non-reductive monism. The single substance of the Ethics is expressed as an infinity of modes in an infinity of attributes, (...)
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  18. added 2019-06-06
    Hegel’s Epistemic Turn—Or Spinoza's?Heidi M. Ravven - 2003 - Idealistic Studies 33 (2/3):195-202.
    This paper takes issue with Slavoj Zizek's constructed opposition between Spinoza and Hegel. Where Zizek views Hegel's non-dualistic relational epistemology as a substantial improvement over Spinoza's purported dogmatic account of a reality which is external to the perceiver, I argue that Hegel inherited such an epistemology from Spinoza. Ultimately, it is Spinoza who provides Hegel with the conceptual tools for knowledge of the "transphenomenal" within the context of human finitude.
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  19. added 2019-06-06
    The Shadow of Spinoza In Fichte’s WL 1804.Walter Wright - 2003 - Idealistic Studies 33 (2/3):161-174.
    Spinoza exerted a strong pull on many of the German idealists. This paper explores the evidence of Spinoza's influence on Fichte in the latter's 1804 lectures on his Wissenschaftslehre. Fichte explicitly mentions Spinoza's names only three times, and each of these references is critical of Spinoza. However, there are other important resonances connecting the thinking of these two philosophers, each of whom faced charges of atheism. These include the priority each grants to practical reason, the accounts each gives of what (...)
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  20. added 2019-06-06
    Heine’s Spinoza.Willi Goetschel - 2003 - Idealistic Studies 33 (2/3):203-217.
    A key moment in Spinoza reception, Heine's writing gains sharper theoretical contours when read with careful attention to the way in which he appropriates Spinoza. Heine's portrayal of Spinoza in his On the History of Religion and Philosophy in Germany does not only represent a critical intervention in the project of intellectual history writing that argues for Spinoza's thought to be constitutive for modernity, but Spinoza's presence can also be traced in his poetry and fiction. Heine's original appropriation of Spinoza (...)
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  21. added 2019-06-06
    The Disappearance Of Analogy in Descartes, Spinoza, and Regis.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2000 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):85-113.
    This article considers complications for the principle in Descartes that effects are similar to their causes that are connected to his own denial that terms apply "univocally" to God and the creatures He produces. Descartes suggested that there remains an "analogical" relation in virtue of which our mind can be said to be similar to God's. However, this suggestion is undermined by the implication of his doctrine of the creation of the eternal truths that God's will differs entirely from our (...)
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  22. added 2019-06-06
    To Love God for Nothing: Levinas and Spinoza.Richard Cohen - 1998 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 20 (2/1):339-352.
  23. added 2019-06-06
    Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz: The Concept of Substance in Seventeenth-Century Metaphysics. [REVIEW]John Cottingham - 1995 - International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (3):353-354.
  24. added 2019-06-06
    Notes on Spinoza’s Critique of Aristotle’s Ethics: From Teleology to Process Theory.Heidi M. Ravven - 1989 - Philosophy and Theology 4 (1):3-32.
    I argue that Spinoza’s ethical theory may be viewed as a transformation of Aristotle’s teleological account which has been corrected of several fundamental flaws which Spinoza found in Aristotle. The result of Spinoza’s redefinition of ethical activity is a developmental account of ethics which has close kinship with the views of process theoreticians.
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  25. added 2019-06-06
    Natural Theology and the Concept of Perfection in Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz: MARK O. WEBB.Mark O. Webb - 1989 - Religious Studies 25 (4):459-475.
    One of the hallmarks of the early modern rationalists was their confidence that a great deal of metaphysics could be done by purely a priori reasoning. They thought so at least partly because they inherited via Descartes Anselm's confidence that the existence of God could be established by purely a priori reasoning in an ontological argument. They also inherited a Thomistic and scholastic confidence that the concept of God as supremely perfect being, if subjected to serious and deep analysis, would (...)
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  26. added 2019-06-06
    Spinoza, Bennett, and Teleology.Lee C. Rice - 1985 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (2):241-253.
  27. added 2019-06-06
    Malebranche’s Refutation of Spinoza.Daisie Radner - 1977 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 8 (3):113-128.
  28. added 2019-06-06
    Some of Malebranche's Reactions to Spinoza.George S. Getchev - 1932 - Philosophical Review 41:385.
  29. added 2019-06-05
    Philosophies of Political Myth, a Comparative Look Backwards.Chiara Bottici - 2009 - European Journal of Political Theory 8 (3):365-382.
    The aim of this article is to recover a tradition of political philosophy which has been largely neglected and show its relevance for contemporary political thought. By arguing for the need of rethinking political myth today, the article reconstructs the philosophical reflections on this topic of Cassirer, Sorel and Spinoza, discussing both their strength and shortcomings. By adopting a comparative look backwards, it shows why they provide an ideal starting point for a philosophical approach to political myth which is aimed (...)
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  30. added 2019-06-05
    I. Liberalism and the Jewish Connection: A Study of Spinoza and the Young Marx.Joel Schwartz - 1985 - Political Theory 13 (1):58-84.
  31. added 2019-05-10
    Spinoza, Religion and Recognition.Ericka Tucker - 2019 - In Maijastina Kahlos, Heikki J. Koskinen & Ritva Palmén (eds.), Reflections on Recognition: Contemporary and Historical Studies. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. pp. 219-231.
    In the pre-history of the concept of recognition Spinoza’s social philosophy deserves a special place. Although we rarely think of Spinoza as a social philosopher, Spinoza understood well the ways in which individual subjectivity is shaped by the social forces. I will argue that Spinoza offers a mechanism to understand the way in which recognition works, in order to untangle the web of affect, desire and ideas, which support the recognitions and misrecognitions at the foundation of social life. Spinoza sets (...)
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  32. added 2019-04-17
    Spinoza'z Jewish Identity and the Use of Context.Wiep Van Bunge - 1997 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 13:100-118.
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  33. added 2019-02-20
    Boyle, Spinoza and Glauber: On the Philosophical Redintegration of Saltpeter A Reply to Antonio Clericuzio.Filip A. A. Buyse - manuscript
    Traditionally, the so-called ‘redintegration experiment’ is at the center of the comments on the supposed Boyle/Spinoza correspondence. A. Clericuzio argued (refuting the interpretation by R.A. & M.B. Hall) in his influential publications that, in De nitro, Boyle accounted for the ‘redintegration’ of saltpeter on the grounds of the chemical properties of corpuscles and did not make any attempt to deduce them from the mechanical principles. By contrast, this paper claims that with his De nitro Boyle wanted to illustrate and promote (...)
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  34. added 2019-01-31
    Spinoza’s Parrot, Socinian Syllogisms, and Leibniz’s Metaphysics: Leibniz’s Three Strategies of Defending Christian Mysteries.Ursula Goldenbaum - 2002 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (4):551-574.
    This paper intends to show the connection between the theological, logical and epistemological ideas in Leibniz’s thinking. The paper will focus on the reasons for Leibniz’s fundamental decision to defend the Christian mysteries and his three different strategies for doing so. Each of these strategies is an answer to a particular challenge: to the Socinian who claims that the mysteries are contradictory; to the mechanical philosophy which denies the possibility of the mysteries, and to Spinoza’s parrot argument which demands that (...)
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  35. added 2018-12-31
    The Philosophes’ Criticism of Religion and D’Holbach’s Non-Hedonistic Materialism.Hasse Hämäläinen - 2017 - Diametros 54:56-75.
    Baron d’Holbach was a critic of established religion, or a philosophe, in late 18 th -century France. His work is often perceived as less inventive than the work of other materialist philosophes, such as Helvétius and Diderot. However, I claim that d’Holbach makes an original, unjustly overlooked move in the criticism of religious moral teaching. According to the materialist philosophes, this teaching claims that true happiness is only possible in the afterlife. As an alternative, Helvétius and Diderot offer theories according (...)
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  36. added 2018-10-15
    Oxford Handbook of Spinoza.Michael Della Rocca (ed.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
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  37. added 2018-10-15
    Gersonides and Spinoza on God’s Knowledge of Universals and Particulars.Yitzhak Melamed - forthcoming - In Gad Freudenthal, David Wirmer & Ofer Elior (eds.), Gersonides Through the Ages.
  38. added 2018-10-15
    Aristotle, Heereboord, and the Polemical Target of Spinoza's Critique of Final Causes.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (3):395-420.
    Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther.... And one fine morning—So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past. in the appendix to the first part of the Ethics, Spinoza famously claims that “all final causes are nothing but human fictions”. From the very beginning of its reception until the (...)
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  39. added 2018-10-15
    Spinoza and Process Ontology.Francesca di Poppa - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (3):272-294.
    In this paper, I put forward some remarks supporting a reading of Spinoza's metaphysics in terms of process ontology, that is, the notion that processes or activities, rather than things, are the most basic entities. I suggest that this reading, while not the only possible one, offers advantages over the traditional substance-properties interpretation. While this claim may sound implausible vis-à-vis Spinoza's language of ‘substance’ and ‘attributes’, I show that process ontology illuminates important features of Spinoza's thought and can facilitate solutions (...)
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  40. added 2018-10-15
    Expressionism in Philosophy: Spinoza.Gilles Deleuze - 1990 - MIT Press.
  41. added 2018-10-15
    A Criticism of D. Bidney's "Spinoza and Whitehead".Allison H. Johnson - 1938 - Philosophical Review 47 (4):410-414.
  42. added 2018-08-05
    Spinoza and Christiaan Huygens: The Odd Philosopher and the Odd Sympathy of Pendulum Clocks.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2017 - Society and Politics 11 (2):115-138.
    In 1665, in a response to a question posed by Robert Boyle, Spinoza gave a definition of the coherence between bodies in the universe that seems to be inconsistent both with what he had written in a previous letter to Boyle (1661) and with what he would later write in his main work, the Ethics (1677). Specifically, Spinoza’s 1665 letter to Boyle asserts that bodies can adapt themselves to another body in a non-mechanistic way and absent the agency of an (...)
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  43. added 2018-08-05
    Galileo Galilei, Holland and the Pendulum Clock.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2017 - O Que Nos Faz Pensar 26 (41):9-43.
    The pendulum clock was one of the most important metaphors for early modern philosophers. Christiaan Huygens (1629-1695) discovered his pendulum clock in 1656 based on the principle of isochronism discovered by Galileo (1564-1642). This paper aims at exploring the broad historical context of this invention, showing the role of some key figures such as Andreas Colvius (1594-1671), Elia Diodati (1576-1661), Hugo Grotius (1583-1645) and Constantijn Huygens, the father of Christiaan Huygens. Secondly, it suggests - based on this context - that (...)
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  44. added 2018-02-18
    From Kant to Post-Kantian Idealism: German Idealism.Sebastian Gardner - 2002 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):211–228.
    German idealism has been pictured as an unwarranted deviation from the central epistemological orientation of modern philosophy, and its close historical association with German romanticism is adduced in support of this verdict. This paper proposes an interpretation of German idealism which seeks to grant key importance to its connection with romanticism without thereby undermining its philosophical rationality. I suggest that the fundamental motivation of German idealism is axiological, and that its augment of Kant's idealism is intelligible in terms of its (...)
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  45. added 2018-02-18
    Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz.Michael J. Murray - 1994 - The Leibniz Review 4:2-5.
  46. added 2018-02-17
    Leibniz lecteur de Spinoza.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2009 - The Leibniz Review 19:71-75.
  47. added 2018-02-17
    Evald Il’Enkov as an Interpreter of Spinoza.Vesa Oittinen - 2005 - Studies in East European Thought 57 (3-4):319-338.
    E. V. Il'enkov is regarded as perhaps the most "Spinozist" of Soviet philosophers. He used Spinoza's ideas extensively, especially in developing his concept of the ideal and in his attempts to give a more precise philosophical formulation to the "activity approach" of the cultural-historical school of Soviet psychology. A more detailed analysis reveals, however, that Il'enkov's reception of Spinoza was highly selective, and that there are substantial differences between them.
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  48. added 2017-09-30
    Intenzionalità della sostanza. Carl Stumpf interprete di Spinoza.Riccardo Martinelli - 2001 - Discipline Filosofiche 11 (2).
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  49. added 2017-09-04
    “Eu Sou, Eu Existo: Isto É Certo; Mas Por Quanto Tempo?”: O Tempo, o Eu E Os Outros Eus.Lia Levy - 1997 - Analytica 2 (2):161-185.
    Ce texte propose une justification de la critique que Spinoza adresse à Descartes, par l’intermédiaire de Louis Meyer, dans la Préface des Principes de la Philosophie de Descartes ; plus particulièrement, il s’agit de reconstruire ses raisons pour affirmer qu’il n’a pas été prouvé, dans la Seconde Méditation, que la chose qui est désignée par le terme ‘je’ puisse être une substance. L’argument qui doit soutenir cette affirma- tion peut être schématisé de la façon suivante : Descartes ne peut introduire (...)
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  50. added 2017-07-10
    ““Deus Sive Vernunft: Schelling’s Transformation of Spinoza’s God”.Yitzhak Melamed - 2020 - In G. Anthony Bruno (ed.), Schelling’s Philosophy: Freedom, Nature, and Systematicity. Oxford University Press. pp. 93-115.
    On 6 January 1795, the twenty-year-old Schelling—still a student at the Tübinger Stift—wrote to his friend and former roommate, Hegel: “Now I am working on an Ethics à la Spinoza. It is designed to establish the highest principles of all philosophy, in which theoretical and practical reason are united”. A month later, he announced in another letter to Hegel: “I have become a Spinozist! Don’t be astonished. You will soon hear how”. At this period in his philosophical development, Schelling had (...)
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