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  1. Spinoza and Galileo Galilei: Adequate Ideas and Intrinsic Qualities of Bodies.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2008 - Historia Philosophica 6:117-127.
  2. Zwaarte: Een polemiek in de zeventiende eeuw.W. N. A. Klever - 1990 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 52 (2):280 - 314.
    Gravity was a major theme in the seventeenth century scientific discussion. Trendsetters in the renewal of natural science were Galilei and Descartes. The first required a unified theory of all phenomena of gravity ; the second provided one with his vortex-hypothesis, which explained gravity by the mechanical push of subtile bodies of the vortex. This conception was tested and generally followed by Christiaan Huygens, whereas Newton presented the laws of the so called 'attraction' by which he did not at all (...)
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  3. Moles in Motu: Principles of Spinoza's Physics.W. N. A. Klever - 1988 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 4:165-194.
  4. The Motion of the Projectile-Elucidation of Spinoza's Physics.Wim Klever - 1993 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 9:335-340.
  5. „Axioms in Spinoza's Science and Philosophy of Science “.Wim Klever - 1986 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 2:171-195.
  6. Spinoza and the Concept of a Law of Nature.Jon Miller - 2003 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (3):257 - 276.
    In the early modern period, laws of nature underwent two re markable changes: first, their role in science and philosophy was greatly expanded as they became central to investigation and explanation; and second, ontology (are the laws “real” or not?) and induction emerged as far and away the most important problems of interpretation. The dramatic expansion in the variety of the laws and their range of application, together with the emergence of ontology and induction as (the) paramount problems of interpretation, (...)
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  7. Newton and Spinoza: On Motion and Matter (and God, of Course).Eric Schliesser - 2012 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):436-458.
    This study explores several arguments against Spinoza's philosophy that were developed by Henry More, Samuel Clarke, and Colin Maclaurin. In the arguments on which I focus, More, Clarke, and Maclaurin aim to establish the existence of an immaterial and intelligent God precisely by showing that Spinoza does not have the resources to adequately explain the origin of motion. Attending to these criticisms grants us a deeper appreciation for how the authority derived from the empirical success of Newton's enterprise was used (...)
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  8. Spinoza on the Politics of PhilosophicalUnderstanding Susan James and Eric Schliesser Angels and Philosophers: With a New Interpretation of Spinoza's Common Notions.Eric Schliesser - 2011 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (3pt3):497-518.
    In this paper I offer three main challenges to James (2011). All three turn on the nature of philosophy and secure knowledge in Spinoza. First, I criticize James's account of the epistemic role that experience plays in securing adequate ideas for Spinoza. In doing so I criticize her treatment of what is known as the ‘conatus doctrine’ in Spinoza in order to challenge her picture of the relationship between true religion and philosophy. Second, this leads me into a criticism of (...)
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  9. A Fresh Look on the Role of the Second Kind of Knowledge in Spinoza’s Ethics.Oliver Istvan Toth - 2017 - Hungarian Philosophical Review (2):37-56.
    In this paper, through a close reading of Spinoza's use of common notions I argue for the role of experiential and experimental knowledge in Spinoza's epistemology.
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