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  1. A Note on" Consciousness/Conscience" in the" Ethics".Étienne Balibar - 1992 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 8:37-54.
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  2. Conscience Et Connaissance Experientielle: Le Role des Affects Dans la Progression Ethique Chez Spinoza.Syliane Charles - 2002 - Dissertation, University of Ottawa (Canada)
    La double question a la source de ce travail est la suivante: comment le mecanisme du progres dans la connaissance se deploie-t-il exactement chez Spinoza, et pourquoi ce processus cognitif, relie aux idees qu'on possede, est-il en meme temps un processus ethique, relie a la joie et au bonheur? On constate que le champ de l'ethique n'est pas, a proprement parler, celui de la connaissance, mais celui du progres dans la connaissance, qui s'acheve par une conscience superieure de soi, de (...)
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  3. Affects Et Conscience Chez Spinoza.Syliane Malinowski Charles (ed.) - 2004 - Georg Olms.
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  4. Representation and Consciousness in Spinoza's Naturalistic Theory of the Imagination.Don Garrett - 2008 - In Charles Huenemann (ed.), Interpreting Spinoza: Critical Essays. Cambridge University Press. pp. 4--25.
  5. Theories About Consciousness in Spinoza's Ethics.M. LeBuffe - 2010 - Philosophical Review 119 (4):531-563.
    Spinoza's remarks about consciousness in the Ethics constitute two theories about conscious experience and knowledge. Several remarks, including 3p9 and 4p8, make the point that self knowledge—an especially valuable good for Spinoza—is not available to introspection. We are, as a matter of course, conscious of ourselves, but we do not, as a matter of course, know ourselves. A second group of remarks, all of which occur in part 5 of the Ethics, emphasizes a different point about consciousness and knowledge: the (...)
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  6. The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza’s Science of the Mind by Eugene Marshall.Michael LeBuffe - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):846-847.
  7. L'Automate spirituel. La subjectivé moderne d'après l'Ethique de Spinoza.Lia Levy - 2000 - Van Gorcum.
    According to the majority of interpreters of Spinozist philosophy, his doctrine is independent of the modern notion of subjectivity. This study, however, shows that the theory of human knowledge presented in the Ethics can not be rightly understood without adding a certain concept of self-consciousness, and so must contain a theory of subjectivity. Moreover, this theory is reconstructed from Spinozist concepts: self-awareness is, for man, the manifestation of his conatus as a finite thinking unity existing in duration . This reconstruction (...)
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  8. Consciousness, Ideas of Ideas and Animation in Spinoza’s Ethics.Oberto Marrama - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (3):506-525.
    ABSTRACTIn the following article, I aim to elucidate the meaning and scope of Spinoza’s vocabulary related to ‘consciousness’. I argue that Spinoza, at least in his Ethics, uses this notion consistently, although rarely. He introduces it to account for the knowledge we may have of the mind considered alone, as conceptually distinct from the body. This serves two purposes in Spinoza’s Ethics: to explain our illusion of a free will, on the one hand, and to refer to the knowledge we (...)
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  9. The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza's Science of the Mind.Eugene Marshall - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Eugene Marshall presents an original, systematic account of Spinoza's philosophy of mind, in which the mind is presented as an affective mechanism that, when rational, behaves as a spiritual automaton. He explores key themes in Spinoza's thought, and illuminates his philosophical and ethical project in a striking new way.
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  10. Consciousness in Spinoza's Philosophy of Mind.Christopher Martin - 2007 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):269-287.
    Spinoza’s philosophy of mind is thought to lack a serious account of consciousness. In this essay I argue that Spinoza’s doctrine of ideas of ideas has been wrongly construed, and that once righted it provides the foundation for an account. I then draw out the finer details of Spinoza’s account of consciousness, doing my best to defend its plausibility along the way. My view is in response to a proposal byEdwin Curley and the serious objection leveled against it by Margaret (...)
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  11. The Status of Consciousness in Spinoza's Concept of Mind.Jon Miller - 2007 - In Consciousness: From Perception to Reflection in the History of Philosophy. Springer.
    Let me start with my conclusions: like most other philosophers of his era, Spinoza did not have well-developed views on consciousness and its place in the mind. Somewhat paradoxically, however, a basic tenet of his metaphysics generated a problem which might have been solved if he had thought more about those issues. So in the end, then, Spinoza did not have much to say about consciousness even though the coherency or at least the plausibility of his system demanded it. With (...)
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  12. A Spinozist Approach to the Conceptual Gap in Consciousness Studies.Frederick B. Mills - 2001 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (1):91-101.
    This essay argues that Spinoza’s metaphysics offers a theoretical framework for dissolving the conceptual gap in contemporary consciousness studies. The conceptual origins of the gap have their roots in Cartesian substance dualism. If phenomenal experience is conceived as substantially distinct from correlated physical processes in the brain, an explanatory gap opens in our understanding of the mind/body relation. Spinoza’s metaphysics offers an ontology that preserves the qualitative difference between phenomenal experience and physiological processes while conceiving the ultimate numerical unity of (...)
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  13. Spinoza and Consciousness.Steven Nadler - 2008 - Mind 117 (467):575-601.
    Most discussions of Spinoza and consciousness—and there are not many— conclude either that he does not have an account of consciousness, or that he does have one but that it is at best confused, at worst hopeless. I argue, in fact, that people have been looking in the wrong place for Spinoza's account of consciousness, namely, at his doctrine of "ideas of ideas". Indeed, Spinoza offers the possibility of a fairly sophisticated, naturalistic account of consciousness, one that grounds it in (...)
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  14. Adequate Knowledge and Bodily Complexity in Spinoza’s Account of Consciousness.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2011 - Methodus 6:77-104.
    This paper aims to discuss Spinoza’s theory of consciousness by arguing that consciousness is the expression of bodily complexity in terms of adequate knowledge. Firstly, I present the link that Spinoza built up in the second part of the Ethics between the ability of the mind to know itself and the idea ideae theory. Secondly, I present in what sense consciousness turns out to be the result of an adequate knowledge emerging from the epistemological resources of a body as complex (...)
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  15. Eugene Marshall , The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza’s Science of the Mind . Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Alex Silverman - 2014 - Philosophy in Review 34 (5):251-253.