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  1. added 2019-06-06
    The Fickle Multitude: Spinoza and the Problem of Global Democracy.Jonathan Havercroft - 2010 - Constellations 17 (1):120-136.
  2. added 2019-06-06
    The Political Efficacy of Prophetic Madness: Imaginatio in the Tractatus Theologico-Politicus.Sean Erwin - 2000 - Idealistic Studies 30 (3):189-207.
    In this paper I pursue this question of the nature of a possible relationship between imagination and the force/violence particular to human law throughSpinoza's analysis of the prophetic imagination in the Tractatus-Theologico Politic us. My principal concern is to trace the relationship between the history and laws of the Hebrew nation and Spinoza's analysis of the imagination of Moses.
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  3. added 2019-05-10
    Hope, Hate and Indignation: Spinoza on Political Emotion in the Trump Era.Ericka Tucker - 2018 - In M. B. Sable & A. J. Torres (eds.), Trump and Political Philosophy. New York, NY, USA: pp. 131-158.
    Can we ever have politics without the noble lie? Can we have a collective political identity that does not exclude or define ‘us’ as ‘not them’? In the Ethics, Spinoza argues that individual human emotions and imagination shape the social world. This world, he argues, can in turn be shaped by political institutions to be more or less hopeful, more or less rational, or more or less angry and indignant. In his political works, Spinoza offered suggestions for how to shape (...)
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  4. added 2019-01-18
    Spinoza in Twenty-First-Century American and French Philosophy: Metaphysics, Philosophy of Mind, Moral and Political Philosophy.Jack Stetter & Charles Ramond (eds.) - 2019 - London: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Contributors: Steven Barbone, Laurent Bove, Edwin Curley, Valérie Debuiche, Michael Della Rocca, Simon B. Duffy, Daniel Garber, Pascale Gillot, Céline Hervet, Jonathan Israel, Chantal Jaquet, Mogens Lærke, Jacqueline Lagrée, Martin Lin, Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Pierre-François Moreau, Steven Nadler, Knox Peden, Alison Peterman, Charles Ramond, Michael A. Rosenthal, Pascal Sévérac, Hasana Sharp, Jack Stetter, Ariel Suhamy, Lorenzo Vinciguerra.
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  5. added 2017-05-09
    L'État comme âme, le citoyen comme soumis et comme résistant.Jack Stetter - 2015 - Revue de Théologie Et de Philosophie 147 (Spinoza politique - penser la pu):185-205.
    Nous cherchons ici à étudier la signification du fait qu’un État, chez Spinoza, peut se comprendre intégralement comme étant une « âme » singulière. Nous montrons en quoi cette compréhension de l’État comme « âme » permet d’expliciter les éléments centraux de la théorie de l’obéissance chez Spinoza, et en quoi le succès du projet politique spinoziste n’est envisageable que de cette perspective. Nous soulevons en conclusion un paradoxe : Spinoza écrit (TP 3/8) que nul ne cède de sa faculté (...)
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  6. added 2016-10-03
    Review of Lee Ward, Modern Democracy and the Theological-Political Problem in Spinoza, Rousseau, and Jefferson. [REVIEW]Megan Gallagher - 2016 - Perspectives on Politics 14 (3):872-874.
  7. added 2016-07-07
    Review: Revisiting Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise. [REVIEW]Sean Erwin - 2014 - Renaissance Quarterly 4:1407-1408.
  8. added 2016-02-18
    Multitude.Ericka Tucker - 2015 - In Andre Santos Campos (ed.), Spinoza: Basic Concepts. Imprint Academic. pp. 129-141.
    Spinoza’s ‘multitude’, while a key concept of his political philosophy, allows us to better understand Spinoza’s work both in its historical context and as a systematic unity. In this piece, I will propose that we understand Spinoza’s concept of the ‘multitude’ in the context of the development of his political thought, in particular his reading and interpretation of Thomas Hobbes, for whom ‘multitude’ was indeed a technical term. I will show that Spinoza develops his own notion of multitude as an (...)
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  9. added 2015-11-25
    Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Spinoza on Politics.Daniel Frank & Jason Waller - 2015 - Routledge.
    Baruch Spinoza is one of the most influential and controversial political philosophers of the early modern period. Though best-known for his contributions to metaphysics, Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise and his unfinished Political Treatise were widely debated and helped to shape the political writings of philosophers as diverse as Rousseau, Kant, Marx, Nietzsche, and even Locke. In addition to its enormous historical importance, Spinoza’s political philosophy is also strikingly contemporary in its advocacy of toleration of unpopular religious and political views and his (...)
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  10. added 2015-11-25
    Democracy and the Multitude: Spinoza Against Negri.Sandra Field - 2012 - Theoria: A Journal of Social and Political Theory 59 (131):21-40.
    Negri celebrates a conception of democracy in which the concrete powers of individual humans are not alienated away, but rather are added together: this is a democracy of the multitude. But how can the multitude act without alienating anyone’s power? To answer this difficulty, Negri explicitly appeals to Spinoza. Nonetheless, in this paper, I argue that Spinoza’s philosophy does not support Negri’s project. I argue that the Spinozist multitude avoids internal hierarchy through the mediation of political institutions and not in (...)
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  11. added 2015-11-25
    Autonomy and the Relational Individual : Spinoza and Feminism.Aurelia Armstrong - 2009 - In Moira Gatens (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Benedict Spinoza. Pennsylvania State University Press.
  12. added 2015-11-25
    The Moral and Political Philosophy of Spinoza.Hans W. Blom - 1993 - In G. H. R. Parkinson (ed.), The Renaissance and Seventeenth-Century Rationalism. Routledge.
  13. added 2015-11-25
    Spinoza's Political Philosophy: The Lessons and Problems of a Conservative Democrat.Lewis S. Feuer - 1980 - In Richard Kennington (ed.), The Philosophy of Baruch Spinoza. Catholic University of America Press. pp. 133--53.
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  14. added 2015-01-15
    The Tractatus Theologico-Politicus and the Received View of Spinoza on Democracy.Wouter F. Kalf - 2014 - Res Publica 20 (3):263-279.
    On many interpretations of Spinoza’s political philosophy, democracy emerges as his ideal type of government. But a type of government can be ideal and yet it can be unwise to implement it if certain background conditions obtain. For example, a dominion’s people can be too ‘wretched by the conditions of slavery’ to rule themselves. This begs the following question. Do Spinoza’s arguments for democracy entail that all political bodies should be democracies at all times (the received view), or do they (...)
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  15. added 2015-01-15
    Baruch Spinoza and Western Democracy.John Burnheim - 1955 - Philosophical Studies 5:161-161.
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