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  1. Spinoza, Baruch.Michael LeBuffe - 2013 - International Encyclopedia of Ethics.
    Baruch, or Benedictus, Spinoza (1632–77) is the author of works, especially the Ethics and the Theological-Political Treatise, that are a major source of the ideas of the European Enlightenment. The Ethics is a dense series of arguments on progressively narrower subjects – metaphysics, mind, the human affects, human bondage to passion, and human blessedness – presented in a geometrical order modeled on that of Euclid. In it, Spinoza begins by defending a metaphysics on which God is the only substance and (...)
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  2. The Value of Critical Knowledge, Ethics and Education: Philosophical History Bringing Epistemic and Critical Values to Values.Ignace Haaz - 2019 - Geneva, Switzerland: Globethics Publications.
    This book aims at six important conceptual tools developed by philosophers. The author develops each particular view in a chapter, hoping to constitute at the end a concise, interesting and easily readable whole. These concepts are: 1. Ethics and realism: elucidation of the distinction between understanding and explanation – the lighthouse type of normativity. 2. Leadership, antirealism and moral psychology – the lightning rod type of normativity. 3. Bright light on self-identity and positive reciprocity – the reciprocity type of normativity. (...)
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  3. Spinoza, Feminism, and Domestic Violence.Christopher Yeomans - 2003 - Iyyun 52 (1):54-74.
    In this paper I discuss two related ideas and cross-reference them, as it were, on the common ground of the Spinozistic text. First, I want to construct a Spinozistic account of domestic violence and a Spinozistic response to such violence. This will involve attempting to explicate the phenomenon (or at least one aspect of it, to be defined) through the terms and conceptual structure of Spinoza's Ethics. Second, I want to discuss a feminist reading (interpretation) of Spinoza, that of Luce (...)
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  4. Power, Freedom, and Relational Autonomy.Ericka Tucker - forthcoming - In Aurelia Armstrong, Keith Green & Andrea Sangiacomo (eds.), Spinoza and Relational Autonomy. Edinburgh, UK: pp. 149-163.
    In recent years, the notion of relational autonomy has transformed the old debate about the freedom of the individual in society. For Spinoza, individual humans are embedded in natural, social and political circumstances from which they derive their power and freedom. I take this to mean that Spinoza’s is best described as a constitutive theory of relational autonomy. I will show how by defining freedom in terms of power, Spinoza understands individual freedom as irreducibly relational. I propose that Spinoza develops (...)
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  5. The World is a Mirror of the Self.Jacqueline Mariña - 2008 - In Transformation of the Self in the thought of Schleiermacher. Oxford University Press.
    This is the fourth chapter of Transformation of the Self. In it I explore Schleiermacher's reception of Leibniz in the Monologen.
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  6. “Spinoza on the Value of Humanity”.Yitzhak Melamed - forthcoming - In Re-Evaluating the Value of Humanity.
    Spinoza is a hardcore realist about the nature of human beings and their desires, ambitions, and delusions. But he is neither a misanthrope nor in the business of glorifying the notion of a primal and innocent non-human nature. As he writes: Let the Satirists laugh as much as they like at human affairs, let the Theologians curse them, let Melancholics praise as much as they can a life that is uncultivated and wild, let them disdain men and admire the lower (...)
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  7. Harmony in Spinoza and His Critics.Timothy Yenter - 2018 - In Beth Lord (ed.), Spinoza’s Philosophy of Ratio. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
    Spinoza is in a potentially untenable position. On the one hand, he argues that those who claim to see harmony in the universe are badly mistaken; they are falsely imagining rather than properly reasoning. On the other hand, harmony is positively discussed in his ethical writings and even serves as the basis for his vision of society. How can both be maintained? In this chapter l argue that this prima facie conflict between the two treatments of harmony is resolvable, but (...)
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  8. Spinoza as Educator: From Eudaimonistic Ethics to an Empowering and Liberating Pedagogy.Nimrod Aloni - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (4):531-544.
    Although Spinoza's formative influence on the cultural ideals of the West is widely recognized, especially with reference to liberal democracy, secular humanism, and naturalistic ethics, little has been written about the educational implications of his philosophy. This article explores the pedagogical tenets that are implicit in Spinoza's writings. I argue that Spinoza's ethics is eudaimonistic, aiming at self‐affirmation, full humanity and wellbeing; that the flourishing of individuals depends on their personal resources, namely, their conatus, power, vitality or capacity to act (...)
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  9. Notes on Spinoza’s Critique of Aristotle’s Ethics: From Teleology to Process Theory.Heidi M. Ravven - 1989 - Philosophy and Theology 4 (1):3-32.
    I argue that Spinoza’s ethical theory may be viewed as a transformation of Aristotle’s teleological account which has been corrected of several fundamental flaws which Spinoza found in Aristotle. The result of Spinoza’s redefinition of ethical activity is a developmental account of ethics which has close kinship with the views of process theoreticians.
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  10. The Moral and Political Implications of Spinoza’s Concept of Individuality.Peter Rickman - 1995 - Cogito 9 (3):249-253.
  11. The Relation Between Life, Conatus, and Virtue in Spinoza’s Philosophy.Sylvain Zac - 1996 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 19 (1):151-173.
    In order to further clarify the meaning of Spinoza’s teachings, I will demonstrate in the following article that, according to the author of the Ethics, God is life, that the conatus, the internal dynamism of all singular things, are the manifestations of the life of God in different degrees, in the infinity of his modes relating to the infinity of his attributes, that virtue, the most perfect form of the conatus in man, is the “true life,” participation in the life (...)
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  12. Habitude, Connaissance Et Vertu Chez Spinoza.Syliane Malinowski-Charles - 2004 - Dialogue 43 (1):99-124.
    La notion d’habitude est-elle amenée à jouer un rôle dans l’éthique spinoziste? Une première réponse à cette question doit être négative, si l’on considère que le concept et les formules servant à l’exprimer ne sont pas théorisées directement dans les textes et servent généralement à désigner les coutumes ou les traits constants entre les hommes, ce qui est un sens différent de celui qui nous intéresse spécifiquement ici. Pourtant, la question mérite assurément d’être posée, et ce dans l’optique d’une interrogation (...)
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  13. Spinoza and the Ethics.Diane Steinberg & Genevieve Lloyd - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (3):488.
    Genevieve Lloyd's Spinoza and the Ethics is written as a guidebook for novice readers of Spinoza. Why is such a book needed when there are already a number of others which can well serve the function of introducing Spinoza's philosophy to new readers? The answer is that Lloyd's book is distinctive in two ways. First, it provides a unique perspective on Spinoza, emphasizing aspects of his philosophy which are not typically rationalist. And second, Lloyd has made a particular effort not (...)
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  14. God, Good and Geometry in Spinoza’s Ethics.Nathan Benjamin - unknown
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  15. The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics.Olli Koistinen (ed.) - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Since its publication in 1677, Spinoza's Ethics has fascinated philosophers, novelists, and scientists alike. It is undoubtedly one of the most exciting and contested works of Western philosophy. Written in an austere, geometrical fashion, the work teaches us how we should live, ending with an ethics in which the only thing good in itself is understanding. Spinoza argues that only that which hinders us from understanding is bad and shows that those endowed with a human mind should devote themselves, as (...)
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  16. Spinoza's 'Ethics': An Introduction.Steven Nadler - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Spinoza's Ethics is one of the most remarkable, important, and difficult books in the history of philosophy: a treatise simultaneously on metaphysics, knowledge, philosophical psychology, moral philosophy, and political philosophy. It presents, in Spinoza's famous 'geometric method', his radical views on God, Nature, the human being, and happiness. In this wide-ranging 2006 introduction to the work, Steven Nadler explains the doctrines and arguments of the Ethics, and shows why Spinoza's endlessly fascinating ideas may have been so troubling to his contemporaries, (...)
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  17. The Young Spinoza: A Metaphysician in the Making.Yitzhak Y. Melamed (ed.) - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    Ex nihilo nihil fit. Philosophy, especially great philosophy, does not appear out of the blue. In the current volume, a team of top scholars-both up-and-coming and established-attempts to trace the philosophical development of one of the greatest philosophers of all time. Featuring twenty new essays and an introduction, it is the first attempt of its kind in English and its appearance coincides with the recent surge of interest in Spinoza in Anglo-American philosophy.Spinoza's fame-or notoriety-is due primarily to his posthumously published (...)
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  18. Self-Preservation and Love in Spinoza's "Ethics".Anneliese Hoos - 2000 - Dissertation, Columbia University
    In my dissertation I explore the relationship between Spinoza's conception of self-preservation and the various forms of love discussed in the Ethics. After considering his early conception of love in the first of four chapters, I show how love, in all its forms, is related to Spinoza's conception of conatus or striving to persist in existence. In contrast to other interpretations of the Ethics, I emphasize the non-teleological component of Spinoza's mature philosophy and argue that love, in particular intellectual love, (...)
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  19. Inleiding tot de affectleer van Spinoza.De H. Dijn - 1977 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 39:399-408.
    After a sketch of the metaphysical and anthropological foundations of Spinoza's theory of affects, the basic notions of this theory and their relations are investigated. A short discussion on the difference between Descartes and Spinoza as to how to control our passive affects ends this paper.
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  20. The Achievement of Selfhood and the Life of Reason in the 'Ethics' of Spinoza.Robert Charles O'brien - 1968 - Dissertation, Fordham University
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  21. Two Types of Seventeenth Century Naturalistic Ethics.Michael Leon Lebuffe - 2000 - Dissertation, University of California, San Diego
    Whereas Spinoza's ethics is often thought to be a recasting of Hobbesian ethics, I argue that his theory of motivation is better than Hobbes's, that his theory of value is richer than Hobbes's, and that both are highly distinctive. Edwin Curley and Jonathan Bennett both attribute to Spinoza an ethical theory similar to Hobbes's: all human agents necessarily want to do whatever they think will preserve them, and anything valuable has moral value just because it is a necessary means to (...)
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  22. Understanding and the Moral: A Contemporary Adaptation of the Ethics of Baruch Spinoza.Kathy Frashure Coers - 1988 - Dissertation, Emory University
    This study develops a twentieth-century adaptation of the ethics of Baruch Spinoza, which I have named "neo-Spinozism." This new theory agrees with the original in taking truth as its ideal, its expanded form of egoism, its non-anthropomorphism, its anti-supernaturalism, and its faith in the unity of ultimate reality. It differs in its specific metaphysics, its epistemology, and its theory of beatitude. ;Chapter One describes the two contexts within which it should be seen: that of recent reactions against the state of (...)
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  23. Buddhist Aspects of Spinoza's Thought.Marie Parrice - 1992 - Dissertation, City University of New York
    This dissertation shows how, despite vast differences in metaphysical approach. Gautama Siddhartha and Spinoza arrived at strikingly similar insights concerning the nature of the universe, the human condition and the place of man in that universe. It does not attempt to establish any influence of Buddhism upon Spinoza's thought. As well as exploring significant parallels in their philosophies, it refutes commonly-held misconceptions of them as pessimistic and ascetic and their characterization as mystics. Both offer positive philosophies showing the way to (...)
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  24. Spinoza and the Ethics.Genevieve Lloyd - 1996 - Mind 109 (435):621-624.
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  25. BIDNEY, D. - The Psychology and Ethics of Spinoza. [REVIEW]H. F. Hallett - 1941 - Mind 50:385.
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  26. Spinoza's Intermediate Ethics for Society and the Family.Heidi Ravven - 2001 - Animus 6:80-95.
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  27. A Formalization Of A Segment I Of Spinoza's Ethics.A. Blum & S. Malinovich - 1993 - Metalogicon 1:1-14.
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  28. Truth, Adequacy and Being in Spinoza’s Ethics.Lance Richey - 1993 - Lyceum 5 (1):21-36.
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  29. Ideae Idearum in Spinoza’s Ethics.Fred Ablondi - 1994 - Lyceum 6 (2):19-24.
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  30. Spinoza's Moral Philosophy.Stephen Anthony Biddle - 1980 - Dissertation, Bryn Mawr College
    Chapter Four uses the concept of an adequate moral theory to evaluate Spinoza's moral philosophy. After isolating four criteria of an adequate moral theory, I attempt to demonstrate that Spinoza's theory can competently meet these standards and that frequently his explanations are superior to the accounts of other moral philosophers. It is this competence in explaining essential elements of our moral experience that warrants a detailed examination of the premises on which Spinoza's moral theory rests. Such an examination must critically (...)
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  31. L'automa spirituale. La teoria della mente e delle passioni in Spinoza.Sergio Cremaschi - 1979 - Milan, Metropolitan City of Milan, Italy: Vita e Pensiero.
    Preface -/- 1. 'Anima' and 'res cogitans'. The Cartesian idea of nature and mind as a residual concept. The first chapter discusses the genesis of the concept of mind in Cartesian Philosophy; the claim is advanced that 'res cogitans' is a residual concept, defined on the basis of a previous definition of matter as 'res extensa'. As a consequence, a contradictory ontology of the mind is Descartes's poisoned bequest to the following tradition of 'scientific' psychology. -/- 2. The Mathematical method (...)
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  32. H. H. Joachim, The Ethics of Spinoza. [REVIEW]F. Pollock - 1902 - Mind 11:246.
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  33. Spinoza and Ethical Subjectivism.Ruth Mattern - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 4:59.
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  34. God and Freedom. Studies on the Philosophy of Religion of Goethe’s Day. Vol. I: The Spinoza Renaissance. [REVIEW]Wolfgang Bartuschat - 1976 - Philosophy and History 9 (2):182-185.
  35. Spinoza’s Ethics in Global Management.Lydia B. Amir - 2012 - Journal of Global Studies 4 (1):123-138.
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  36. 'Use Them At Our Pleasure': Spinoza on Animal Ethics.John Grey - 2013 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 30 (4):367-388.
    Although Spinoza disagrees with Descartes's claim that animals are mindless, he holds that we may nevertheless treat them as we please because their natures are different from human nature. Margaret Wilson has questioned the validity of Spinoza's argument, since it is not clear why differences in nature should imply differences in ethical status. In this paper, I propose a new interpretation of Spinoza's argument that responds to Wilson's challenge. We have ethical commitments to other humans only because we share the (...)
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  37. Human Affects as Properties of Cognitions in Spinoza's Philosophical Psychotherapy.Amihud Gilead - 1999 - In Yirmiyahu Yovel (ed.). Little Room Press. pp. 169--181.
    The Spinozistic essence is the factor of individuation of a particular or individual thing. Affects or emotions are properties of an essence, which, under the attribute of thought, is an idea, i.e., cognition. Such essence is the human mind, which is the idea of a particular actual body. Since our emotions are properties of our cognitions, whether adequate or not, concerning the state of our body, which reflects nature as a whole in a particular way, I entitle Spinoza’s theory of (...)
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  38. Spinoza Et le Probleme de L'Akrasia: Un Aspect Neglige de l'Ordo Geometricus.Jacques Henri Gagnon - 2002 - Philosophiques 29 (1):57--71.
    The question of the weakness of the will, traditionally named akrasia after Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics (Book III), is tackled in part 4 of Spinoza’s Ethics. After a brief presentation of this problematic in the Ethics, the author shows how the geometrical order chosen by Spinoza to write his book constitutes a great part of the strategy put in place to concretely resolve this question.
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  39. The Psychology and Ethics of Spinoza; a Study in the History and Logic of Ideas.David Bidney (ed.) - 1940 - Yale University Press.
  40. Spinoza's Amor Dei Intellectualis.Yitzhak Melamed - forthcoming - In Noa Naaman (ed.), Descartes and Spinoza on the Passions. Cambridge University Press.
    The notion of divine love was essential to medieval Christian conceptions of God. Jewish thinkers, though, had a much more ambivalent attitude about this issue. While Maimonides was reluctant to ascribe love, or any other affect, to God, Gersonides and Crescas celebrated God’s love. Though Spinoza is clearly sympathetic to Maimonides’ rejection of divine love as anthropomorphism, he attributes love to God nevertheless, unfolding his notion of amor Dei intellectualis at the conclusion of his Ethics. But is this a legitimate (...)
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  41. Behind the Geometrical Method: A Reading of Spinoza's Ethics.Edwin M. Curley - 1988 - Princeton University Press.
    This book is the fruit of twenty-five years of study of Spinoza by the editor and translator of a new and widely acclaimed edition of Spinoza's collected works.
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  42. Spinoza's Ethics.Beth Lord - 2010 - Indiana University Press.
    Baruch Spinoza was born in Amsterdam during a period of unprecedented scientific, artistic, and intellectual discovery. Upon its release, Spinoza’s Ethics was banned; today it is the quintessential example of philosophical method. Although acknowledged as difficult, the book is widely taught in philosophy, literature, history, and politics. This introduction is designed to be read side by side with Spinoza's work. As a guide to the style, vocabulary, and arguments of the Ethics, it offers a range of interpretive possibilities to prepare (...)
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  43. Some Tensions in Spinoza's Ethical Theory.Jay Newman - 1980 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 7 (3):357-74.
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  44. Spinoza's Anti-Humanism: An Outline.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2011 - In Smith Justin & Fraenkel Carlos (eds.), The Rationalists. Springer/Synthese. pp. 147--166.
  45. Psychotherapy and Moral Perfection: Spinoza and the Stoics on the Prospect of Happiness.Firmin DeBrabander - 2004 - In Steven K. Strange & Jack Zupko (eds.), Stoicism: Traditions and Transformations. Cambridge University Press. pp. 198--213.
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  46. Spinoza on the Relativity of Good and Evil.Charles Jarrett - 2002 - In Olli Koistinen & J. I. Biro (eds.), Spinoza: Metaphysical Themes. Oxford University Press. pp. 159--181.
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  47. Spinoza's Emotivism.Dennis A. Rohatyn - 1976 - In James Benjamin Wilbur (ed.), Spinoza's Metaphysics: Essays in Critical Appreciation. Van Gorcum.
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  48. Normative Reasoning in Spinoza: Two Interpretations.Jon Wetlesen - 1974 - In der Bend & G. J. (eds.), Spinoza on Knowing, Being and Freedom. Assen, van Gorcum. pp. 162--171.
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  49. The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza's Science of the Mind.Eugene Marshall - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Eugene Marshall presents an original, systematic account of Spinoza's philosophy of mind, in which the mind is presented as an affective mechanism that, when rational, behaves as a spiritual automaton. He explores key themes in Spinoza's thought, and illuminates his philosophical and ethical project in a striking new way.
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  50. Pascal and Spinoza-Religious Ethics and the Ethicality of Metaphysics.A. Deregibus - 1993 - Filosofia 44 (2):195-252.
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