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  1. The possibility of knowing the essence of bodies through scientific experiments in Spinoza’s controversy with Boyle.Oliver Istvan Toth - 2024 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-25.
    In this paper, I argue for a novel reading of Spinoza’s position in his exchangewith Boyle about Boyle’s experiment with nitre. Boyle claimed to have shownthrough experiments that nitre ceased to be nitre after heating. Spinozadisagreed and proposed the alternative hypothesis that nitre has changed itsstate and not its nature. Spinoza’s position was construed in the literature asrational scepticism denying that experiments can yield knowledge ofessences because all sensory experience is underdetermined and open tomultiple interpretations. I argue for an alternative (...)
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  2. Spinoza's Ethics: a guide.Michael LeBuffe - 2023 - New York, NY, United States of America: Oxford University Press.
    This guide has an introduction and five chapters, one for each of the parts of Spinoza's Ethics. The Introduction includes background material necessary for productive study of the Ethics: advice for working with Spinoza's geometrical method, a biographical sketch of Spinoza, and accounts of important predecessors: Aristotle, Maimonides, and Descartes. The chapters that follow trace the Ethics in detail, including accounts of most of the elements in Spinoza's book and raising questions for further research. Chapter 1, "One Infinite Substance," covers (...)
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  3. Contrariety and Complementarity: Reading Spinoza’s Intersubjective Holism of Ideas with Aristotle’s Two Accounts of Motion.Buhr Lorina - 2023 - Journal of Spinoza Studies 2 (2):14-20.
    Do minds and ideas connect, interact, or even depend on each other, and if so, how exactly do they connect and interact? How should we conceive of the mode and process of minds and ideas being in a network and connected in some way, that is, being intersubjective or social? Martin Lenz's study Socializing Minds convincingly shows that, contrary to widespread opinion in philosophy of mind, at least some early modern philosophers, here Spinoza, Locke, and Hume, actually give a positive (...)
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  4. Od patetiky k etike. Spinozova teória ľudskej slobody [From Pathetics to Ethics. Spinoza's Theory of Human Freedom].Michaela Petrufova Joppova - 2022 - Prešov, Slovensko: Atény nad Torysou.
    The monograph offers an original account of Spinoza’s philosophy and ethics concentrated on its concordance with selected modern neuroscientific theories. The book proceeds through the whole of Spinoza’s philosophy and by increasingly complex analytical account acquaints with its essential frameworks, terminology, and concepts, and is thus accessible also to readers who are not yet familiar with the thought of this peculiar thinker. The fundamental motives of this interpretation are the nature of the mind and the questions of human freedom and (...)
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  5. Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Mind vol. 2.Uriah Kriegel (ed.) - 2022 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Mind presents cutting-edge work in the philosophy of mind, combining invited articles and articles selected from submissions. Each volume will highlight two themes to bring focus to debates. The series will reflect the diversity of methods adopted in contemporary philosophy of mind and provide a venue for rigorous and innovative work by both established and up-and-coming voices in the field. The themes covered in the second volume are doxastic states, the metaphysics of mind, and Spinoza's (...)
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  6. Spinozistic expression as signification.Antonio Salgado Borge - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 30 (1):24-47.
    I propose a new interpretation of Spinoza’s obscure but important concept of ‘expression’. Any account of Spinozistic expression must be able to fulfil two principal requirements. First, it must be...
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  7. Spinoza on affirmation, Anima and autonomy : 'shattered spirits'.Keith Green - 2019 - In Aurelia Armstrong, Keith Green & Andrea Sangiacomo (eds.), Spinoza and Relational Autonomy: Being with Others. Edinburgh: Eup. pp. 164-193.
  8. Spinoza on the interaction of ideas : biased beliefs.Martin Lenz - 2019 - In Aurelia Armstrong, Keith Green & Andrea Sangiacomo (eds.), Spinoza and Relational Autonomy: Being with Others. Edinburgh: Eup. pp. 50-73.
  9. Affirmation, Judgment, and Epistemic Theodicy in Descartes and Spinoza.Martin Lin - 2019 - In Brian Andrew Ball & Christoph Schuringa (eds.), The Act and Object of Judgment: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives. New York: Routledge.
  10. The Enigma of Spinoza's Amor Dei Intellectualis.Yitzhak Melamed - 2019 - In Noa Naaman (ed.), Descartes and Spinoza on the Passions. Cambridge University Press. pp. 222-238.
    The notion of divine love was essential to medieval Christian conceptions of God. Jewish thinkers, though, had a much more ambivalent attitude about this issue. While Maimonides was reluctant to ascribe love, or any other affect, to God, Gersonides and Crescas celebrated God’s love. Though Spinoza is clearly sympathetic to Maimonides’ rejection of divine love as anthropomorphism, he attributes love to God nevertheless, unfolding his notion of amor Dei intellectualis at the conclusion of his Ethics. But is this a legitimate (...)
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  11. Spinoza's two claims about the mind-body relation.Alison Peterman - 2019 - In Jack Stetter & Charles Ramond (eds.), Spinoza in Twenty-First-Century American and French Philosophy: Metaphysics, Philosophy of Mind, Moral and Political Philosophy. London: Bloomsbury Academic.
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  12. Spinoza's two claims about the mind-body relation.Alison Peterman - 2019 - In Jack Stetter & Charles Ramond (eds.), Spinoza in Twenty-First-Century American and French Philosophy: Metaphysics, Philosophy of Mind, Moral and Political Philosophy. London: Bloomsbury Academic.
  13. The gap between the idea for the body and the idea of the body.Jack Stetter - 2019 - In Jack Stetter & Charles Ramond (eds.), Spinoza in Twenty-First-Century American and French Philosophy: Metaphysics, Philosophy of Mind, Moral and Political Philosophy. London: Bloomsbury Academic.
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  14. The gap between the idea for the body and the idea of the body.Jack Stetter - 2019 - In Jack Stetter & Charles Ramond (eds.), Spinoza in Twenty-First-Century American and French Philosophy: Metaphysics, Philosophy of Mind, Moral and Political Philosophy. London: Bloomsbury Academic.
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  15. Necessity and Nature in Spinoza's Philosophy.Don Garrett - 2018 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  16. Nature and necessity in Spinoza's philosophy.Don Garrett - 2018 - New York City: Oxford University Press.
    Spinoza's guiding commitment to the thesis that nothing exists or occurs outside of the scope of nature and its necessary laws makes him one of the great seventeenth-century exemplars of both philosophical naturalism and explanatory rationalism. Nature and Necessity in Spinoza's Philosophy brings together for the first time eighteen of Don Garrett's articles on Spinoza's philosophy, ranging over the fields of metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, ethics, and political philosophy. Taken together, these influential articles provide a comprehensive interpretation of that (...)
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  17. Spinoza and the Mark of the Mental.Martin Lin - 2017 - In Yitzhak Y. Melamed & Hasana Sharp (eds.), Spinoza's Political Treatise: A Critical Guide. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 82-101.
  18. Remarks on Cognition in Spinoza: Understanding, Sensation, and Belief.John Carriero - 2016 - In Hemmo Laiho & Arto Repo (eds.), DE NATURA RERUM - Scripta in honorem professoris Olli Koistinen sexagesimum annum complentis. Turku: University of Turku. pp. 134-147.
  19. Spinoza on Fictitious Ideas and Possible Entities.Oberto Marrama - 2016 - The European Legacy 21 (4):359-372.
    The aim of this article is twofold: to provide a valid account of Spinoza’s theory of fictitious ideas, and to demonstrate its coherency with the overall modal metaphysics underpinning his philosophical system. According to Leibniz, the existence of romances and novels would be sufficient to demonstrate, against Spinoza’s necessitarianism, that possible entities exist and are intelligible, and that many other worlds different from ours could have existed in its place. I argue that Spinoza does not actually need to resort to (...)
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  20. Inherence of False Beliefs in Spinoza’s Ethics.Oliver Istvan Toth - 2016 - Society and Politics 10 (2):74-94.
    In this paper I argue, based on a comparison of Spinoza's and Descartes‟s discussion of error, that beliefs are affirmations of the content of imagination that is not false in itself, only in relation to the object. This interpretation is an improvement both on the winning ideas reading and on the interpretation reading of beliefs. Contrary to the winning ideas reading it is able to explain belief revision concerning the same representation. Also, it does not need the assumption that I (...)
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  21. Is There a "Pancreas Problem" in Spinoza’s Theory of the Human Mind?Henk Keizer - 2015 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):65-80.
    This article explores a new reading of an important section of Part II of Spinoza’s Ethics. It recognizes that Spinoza actually differentiates between the human mind conceived from the viewpoint of its cause and the human mind conceived from the viewpoint of its nature. It shows, most importantly, that Spinoza assigns different objects to those ‘minds’. Consequently they represent different knowledge of the body. It will appear that the human mind in respect of its cause represents non-conscious knowledge of the (...)
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  22. The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza’s Science of the Mind by Eugene Marshall.Michael LeBuffe - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):846-847.
  23. Man Is A God to Man: How Human Beings Can be Adequate Causes.Eugene Marshall - 2014 - In Matthew J. Kisner & Andrew Youpa (eds.), Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  24. Eugene Marshall , The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza’s Science of the Mind . Reviewed by. [REVIEW]Alex Silverman - 2014 - Philosophy in Review 34 (5):251-253.
  25. The Susceptibility of Intuitive Knowledge to Akrasia in Spinoza's Ethical Thought.Sanem Soyarslan - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (4):725-747.
    Spinoza unequivocally states in the Ethics that intuitive knowledge is more powerful than reason. Nonetheless, it is not clear what exactly this greater power promises in the face of the passions. Does this mean that intuitive knowledge is not liable to akrasia? Ronald Sandler offers what, to my knowledge, is the only explicit answer to this question in recent Spinoza scholarship. According to Sandler, intuitive knowledge, unlike reason, is not susceptible to akrasia. This is because, intuitive knowledge enables the knower (...)
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  26. The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza's Science of the Mind.Eugene Marshall - 2013 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    Eugene Marshall presents an original, systematic account of Spinoza's philosophy of mind, in which the mind is presented as an affective mechanism that, when rational, behaves as a spiritual automaton. He explores key themes in Spinoza's thought, and illuminates his philosophical and ethical project in a striking new way.
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  27. Symposium on Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Spinoza’s Metaphysics,.Yitzhak Melamed - 2013 - Leibniz Review 23:207-222.
  28. Spinoza's Metaphysics: Substance and Thought.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2013 - Oxford: Oxford University Press USA.
    Yitzhak Melamed here offers a new and systematic interpretation of the core of Spinoza's metaphysics. In the first part of the book, he proposes a new reading of the metaphysics of substance in Spinoza: he argues that for Spinoza modes both inhere in and are predicated of God. Using extensive textual evidence, he shows that Spinoza considered modes to be God's propria. He goes on to clarify Spinoza's understanding of infinity, mereological relations, infinite modes, and the flow of finite things (...)
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  29. Nota sul ruolo dell’"essentia corporis" nell’Etica di Spinoza.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2013 - Isonomia: Online Philosophical Journal of the University of Urbino:1-19.
    This paper outlines the role of the bodily essence in Spinoza’s epistemology. Spinoza maintains in the Ethics that the power of the imagination depends on bodily affections and it explains the inadequateness of imaginative ideas. However, Spinoza also exploits the capabilities of the human body to work out his account of common notions, which grounds the adequate knowledge provided by reason. Moreover, the essentia corporis plays a crucial role in the fifth part of the Ethics. Indeed, the “eternal part” of (...)
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  30. The Distinction between Reason and Intuitive Knowledge in Spinoza's Ethics.Sanem Soyarslan - 2013 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (1):27-54.
    While both intuitive knowledge and reason are adequate ways of knowing for Spinoza, they are not equal. Intuitive knowledge, which Spinoza describes as the ‘greatest virtue of mind’, is superior to reason. The nature of this superiority has been the subject of some controversy due to Spinoza's notoriously parsimonious treatment of the distinction between reason and intuitive knowledge in the Ethics. In this paper, I argue that intuitive knowledge differs from reason not only in terms of its method of cognition—but (...)
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  31. Sartre and Spinoza on the nature of mind.Kathleen Wider - 2013 - Continental Philosophy Review 46 (4):555-575.
    What surfaces first when one examines the philosophy of mind of Sartre and Spinoza are the differences between them. For Spinoza a human mind is a mode of the divine mind. That view is a far cry from Sartre’s view of human consciousness as a desire never achieved: the desire to be god, to be the foundation of one’s own existence. How could two philosophers, one a determinist and the other who grounds human freedom in the nature of consciousness itself, (...)
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  32. Spinoza on Passions and Self—Knowledge: The Case of Pride.Lilli Alanen - 2012 - In Martin Pickavé & Lisa Shapiro (eds.), Emotion and cognitive life in Medieval and early modern philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 234.
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  33. Spinoza on Destroying Passions with Reason.Colin Marshall - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (1):139-160.
    Spinoza claims we can control any passion by forming a more clear and distinct idea of it. The interpretive consensus is that Spinoza is either wrong or over-stating his view. I argue that Spinoza’s view is plausible and insightful. After breaking down Spinoza’s characterization of the relevant act, I consider four existing interpretations and conclude that each is unsatisfactory. I then consider a further problem for Spinoza: how his definitions of ‘action’ and ‘passion’ make room for passions becoming action. I (...)
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  34. Spinoza’s Metaphysics of Thought: Parallelisms and the Multifaceted Structure of Ideas.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (3):636-683.
    In this paper, I suggest an outline of a new interpretation of core issues in Spinoza’s metaphysics and philosophy of mind. I argue for three major theses. (1) In the first part of the paper I show that the celebrated Spinozistic doctrine commonly termed “the doctrine of parallelism” is in fact a confusion of two separate and independent doctrines of parallelism. Hence, I argue that our current understanding of Spinoza’s metaphysics and philosophy of mind is fundamentally flawed. (2) The clarification (...)
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  35. Thinking, Conceiving, and Idealism in Spinoza.Samuel Newlands - 2012 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 94 (1):31-52.
    According to Spinoza, what is the relationship between the mental – ideas, minds, and the attribute of Thought – and the conceptual – concepts, conceiving, and conceptual dependence? The natural and pervasive interpretive assumption that Spinoza’s appeals to the conceptual are synonymous with appeals to the mental ought to be rejected, a rejection that prevents some of his central metaphysical doctrines from otherwise collapsing into incoherence. A close reading of key texts shows instead that conceptual relations are attribute-neutral for Spinoza; (...)
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  36. Spinoza on the human mind.Lilli Alanen - 2011 - In Peter A. French (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy Reconsidered. Boston, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
  37. From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence. By Michael LeBuffe.Patrick Madigan - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (1):142-143.
  38. Rationalism Versus Subjective Experience: The Problem of the Two Minds in Spinoza.Syliane Malinowski-Charles - 2011 - In Smith Justin & Fraenkel Carlos (eds.), The Rationalists. Springer/Synthese. pp. 123--143.
  39. Adequate knowledge and bodily complexity in Spinoza’s account of consciousness.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2011 - Methodus 6:77-104.
    This paper aims to discuss Spinoza’s theory of consciousness by arguing that consciousness is the expression of bodily complexity in terms of adequate knowledge. Firstly, I present the link that Spinoza built up in the second part of the Ethics between the ability of the mind to know itself and the idea ideae theory. Secondly, I present in what sense consciousness turns out to be the result of an adequate knowledge emerging from the epistemological resources of a body as complex (...)
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  40. Consciousness in Spinoza's Philosophy of Mind.Christopher Martin - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):269-287.
    Spinoza's philosophy of mind is thought to lack a serious account of consciousness. In this essay I argue that Spinoza's doctrine of ideas of ideas has been wrongly construed, and that once righted it provides the foundation for an account. I then draw out the finer details of Spinoza's account of consciousness, doing my best to defend its plausibility along the way. My view is in response to a proposal by Edwin Curley and the serious objection leveled against it by (...)
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  41. The Politics of Spinoza’s Vanishing Dichotomies.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 2010 - Political Theory 38 (1):131-141.
    Spinoza’s project of showing how the mind can be freed from its passive affects and the State from its divisive factions ultimately coincides with the aims announced in the subtitle of the Tractatus-Theologico-Politicus “to demonstrate that [the] freedom to philosophize does not endanger the piety and obedience required for civic peace.”1 Both projects rest on a set of provisional isomorphic distinctions—between adequate and inadequate ideas, between reason and the imagination, between active and passive affects—that Spinoza proceeds to blur, and indeed (...)
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  42. From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence.Michael LeBuffe - 2009 - New York, US: Oxford University Press USA.
    Spinoza rejects fundamental tenets of received morality, including the notions of Providence and free will. Yet he retains rich theories of good and evil, virtue, perfection, and freedom. Building interconnected readings of Spinoza's accounts of imagination, error, and desire, Michael LeBuffe defends a comprehensive interpretation of Spinoza's enlightened vision of human excellence. Spinoza holds that what is fundamental to human morality is the fact that we find things to be good or evil, not what we take those designations to mean. (...)
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  43. Review of Michael Della Rocca, Spinoza[REVIEW]Michael LeBuffe - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (2).
  44. Explicable explainers: The problem of mental dispositions in Spinoza’s Ethics.Ursula Renz - 2009 - In . pp. 79-98.
  45. Tammy Nyden-Bullock, Spinoza's Radical Cartesian Mind. [REVIEW]Sherry Deveaux - 2008 - Philosophy in Review 28 (5):361-364.
  46. Review of Tammy Nyden-Bullock, Spinoza's Radical Cartesian Mind[REVIEW]Matthew J. Kisner - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (2).
  47. Spinoza's psychological theory.Michael LeBuffe - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  48. Spinoza's cognitive affects and their feel.Eugene Marshall - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):1 – 23.
  49. Adequacy and Innateness in Spinoza.Eugene Marshall - 2008 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 4:51-88.
  50. Rationalism run amok: representation and the reality of emotions in Spinoza.Michael Della Rocco - 2008 - In Charles Huenemann (ed.), Interpreting Spinoza: Critical Essays. New York: Cambridge University Press.
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