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  1. Spinoza, Boyle, Galileo: Was Spinoza a Strict Mechanical Philosopher?Filip Buyse - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (1):45-64.
  2. Review of Don Garrett, Necessity and Nature in Spinoza (Oxford University Press, 2018). The Philosophical Review, Forthcoming. [REVIEW]Yitzhak Melamed - forthcoming - Philosophical Review.
  3. Spinoza, Baruch.Michael LeBuffe - 2013 - International Encyclopedia of Ethics.
    Baruch, or Benedictus, Spinoza (1632–77) is the author of works, especially the Ethics and the Theological-Political Treatise, that are a major source of the ideas of the European Enlightenment. The Ethics is a dense series of arguments on progressively narrower subjects – metaphysics, mind, the human affects, human bondage to passion, and human blessedness – presented in a geometrical order modeled on that of Euclid. In it, Spinoza begins by defending a metaphysics on which God is the only substance and (...)
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  4. Spinoza, Religion and Recognition.Ericka Tucker - 2019 - In Maijastina Kahlos, Heikki J. Koskinen & Ritva Palmén (eds.), Reflections on Recognition: Contemporary and Historical Studies. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. pp. 219-231.
    In the pre-history of the concept of recognition Spinoza’s social philosophy deserves a special place. Although we rarely think of Spinoza as a social philosopher, Spinoza understood well the ways in which individual subjectivity is shaped by the social forces. I will argue that Spinoza offers a mechanism to understand the way in which recognition works, in order to untangle the web of affect, desire and ideas, which support the recognitions and misrecognitions at the foundation of social life. Spinoza sets (...)
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  5. Teleology in Jewish Philosophy: Early Talmudists Till Spinoza.Yitzhak Melamed - forthcoming - In Jeffrey McDonough (ed.), Teleology: A History. New York, NY, USA:
    Medieval and early modern Jewish philosophers developed their thinking in conversation with various bodies of literature. The influence of ancient Greek – primarily Aristotle (and pseudo-Aristotle) – and Arabic sources was fundamental for the very constitution of medieval Jewish philosophical discourse. Toward the late Middle Ages Jewish philosophers also established a critical dialogue with Christian scholastics. Next to these philosophical corpora, Jewish philosophers drew significantly upon Rabbinic sources (Talmud and the numerous Midrashim) and the Hebrew Bible. In order to clarify (...)
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  6. Māyā and Becoming: Deleuze and Vedānta on Attributes, Acosmism, and Parallelism in Spinoza.Michael Hemmingsen - 2018 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 10 (3):238-250.
    ABSTRACTThis paper compares two readings of Baruch Spinoza – those of Gilles Deleuze and Rama Kanta Tripathi – with a particular focus on three features of Spinoza’s philosophy: the relationship between substance and attribute; the problem of acosmism and unity; and the problem of the parallelism of attributes. Deleuze and Tripathi’s understanding of these three issues in Spinoza’s thought illustrates for us their own concerns with becoming over substance and māyā, respectively. This investigation provides not just two interesting and contradictory (...)
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  7. Judaism, Panentheism and Spinoza’s Intellectual Love of God.Richard Mather - 2017
    It is a popular misconception that Spinoza was a pantheist or even an atheist. He was not. Like the medieval Kabbalists, Spinoza was a panentheist.
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  8. Cambridge Critical Guide to Spinoza’s Ethics.Yitzhak Melamed (ed.) - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
  9. Uno Spinoza sistemico: Strumenti per un'interpretazione sistemica del pensiero di Spinoza.Emanuele Costa - 2014 - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 106 (3):525-535.
    In this study, I will attempt a comparison between the philosophy of Spinoza (especially his Ethics) and the systemic philosophy. Firstly, I will analyze the systemic specific terminology; then it will be compared with the Spinozian one, and I will suggest a hypothesis in order to translate Spinoza's terms into systemic ones. Of this hypothesis, I will present the strengths and weaknesses, especially about the notion of 'centralization' of a system and about Spinoza's epistemology.
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  10. Spinoza on Conatus, Inertia, and the Impossibility of Self-Destruction.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2016 - Society and Politics 10 (2):115-134.
    Spinoza (1632-1677) writes in the fourth proposition of the third part of his masterpiece, the Ethics (1677), the bold statement that self-destruction is impossible. This view seems to be very hard to understand given the fact that in our western world we have recently been confronted with an increasing number of suicides, all of which are - per definition – ―actions of killing oneself deliberately‖. Firstly, this article aims at showing, based on the last chapter of the first part of (...)
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  11. “When Having Too Much Power is Harmful? - Spinoza on Political Luck”.Yitzhak Melamed - 2018 - In Yitzhak Melamed & Hasana Sharp (eds.), Spinoza's Political Treatise: A Critical Guide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 161-174.
    Spinoza’s celebrated doctrine of the conatus asserts that “each thing, as far as it can by its own power, strives to persevere in its being” (E3p6). Shortly thereafter Spinoza makes the further claim that the (human) mind strives to increase its power of acting (E3p12). This latter claim is commonly interpreted as asserting that human beings (and their associations) not only strive to persevere in their existence, but also always strive to increase their power. Spinoza’s justification for E3p12 relies (among (...)
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  12. “Spinoza’s Metaphysics of Substance” in Don Garrett (Ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza. 2nd Edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Forthcoming.Yitzhak Melamed - forthcoming - In Don Garrett (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza. 2nd edition. Cambriddge University Press.
    ‘Substance’ (substantia, zelfstandigheid) is a key term of Spinoza’s philosophy. Like almost all of Spinoza’s philosophical vocabulary, Spinoza did not invent this term, which has a long history that can be traced back at least to Aristotle. Yet, Spinoza radicalized the traditional notion of substance and made a very powerful use of it by demonstrating – or at least attempting to demonstrate -- that there is only one, unique substance -- God (or Nature) -- and that all other things are (...)
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  13. Harmony in Spinoza and His Critics.Timothy Yenter - 2018 - In Beth Lord (ed.), Spinoza’s Philosophy of Ratio. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
    Spinoza is in a potentially untenable position. On the one hand, he argues that those who claim to see harmony in the universe are badly mistaken; they are falsely imagining rather than properly reasoning. On the other hand, harmony is positively discussed in his ethical writings and even serves as the basis for his vision of society. How can both be maintained? In this chapter l argue that this prima facie conflict between the two treatments of harmony is resolvable, but (...)
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  14. Blackwell Companion to Spinoza.Yitzhak Y. Melamed (ed.) - forthcoming - Blackwell.
  15. James B. Wilbur, Ed., "Spinoza's Metaphysics: Essays in Critical Appreciation". [REVIEW]Charles E. Jarrett - 1980 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 18 (1):87.
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  16. Defining Spinoza’s Possible Materialism.Meriam Korichi - 2000 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 22 (1):53-69.
    In a letter to Voltaire, d’Alembert described the ‘truth’ of Spinoza’s philosophy as follows.
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  17. Spinoza: Metaphysical Themes.Olli I. Koistinen & John I. Biro (eds.) - 2002 - Oup Usa.
    This collection of previously unpublished essays on Spinoza provides a representative sample of new and interesting research on the philosopher. Spinoza's philosophy still has an underserved reputation for being obscure and incomprehensible. In these chapters, Spinoza is seen mostly as a metaphysician who tried to pave the way for the new science. The essays investigate several themes, notably Spinoza's monism, the nature of the individual, the relation between mind and body, and his place in 17th century philosophy including his relation (...)
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  18. Representation and the Mind-Body Problem in Spinoza.Richard N. Manning - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (4):603.
    In this book, Della Rocca traces out the conceptual links between key concepts and principles of Spinoza's system bearing on representation and the mind-body problem. In the course of doing so, he presents and defends a number of new, interesting theses about Spinoza's thought on these matters. The arguments are presented with impressive clarity and in great detail. All in all, the book is a significant contribution to the literature on Spinoza's metaphysics and epistemology, and should be read by anyone (...)
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  19. VI.—The Substance-Attribute Conception in Philosophy.Shadworth H. Hodgson - 1901 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 1 (1):90-102.
  20. Spinoza's ‘Ethics': A Critical Guide.Yitzhak Y. Melamed (ed.) - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    Spinoza's Ethics, published in 1677, is considered his greatest work and one of history's most influential philosophical treatises. This volume brings established scholars together with new voices to engage with the complex system of philosophy proposed by Spinoza in his masterpiece. Topics including identity, thought, free will, metaphysics, and reason are all addressed, as individual chapters investigate the key themes of the Ethics and combine to offer readers a fresh and thought-provoking view of the work as a whole. Written in (...)
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  21. Eternity in Early Modern Philosophy.Yitzhak Melamed - 2016 - In Yitzhak Y. Melamed (ed.), Eternity: A History. Oxford University Press. pp. 129-167.
    Modernity seemed to be the autumn of eternity. The secularization of European culture provided little sustenance to the concept of eternity with its heavy theological baggage. Yet, our hero would not leave the stage without an outstanding performance of its power and temptation. Indeed, in the first three centuries of the modern period – the subject of the third chapter by Yitzhak Melamed - the concept of eternity will play a crucial role in the great philosophical systems of the period. (...)
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  22. On the Significance of Formal Causes in Spinoza’s Metaphysics.Karolina Hübner - 2015 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 97 (2).
    Name der Zeitschrift: Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie Jahrgang: 97 Heft: 2 Seiten: 196-233.
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  23. Spinoza on Essences, Universals, and Beings of Reason.Karolina Hübner - 2015 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (2):58-88.
    The article proposes a new solution to the long-standing problem of the universality of essences in Spinoza's ontology. It argues that, according to Spinoza, particular things in nature possess unique essences, but that these essences coexist with more general, mind-dependent species-essences, constructed by finite minds on the basis of similarities that obtain among the properties of formally-real particulars. This account provides the best fit both with the textual evidence and with Spinoza's other metaphysical and epistemological commitments. The article offers new (...)
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  24. The Young Spinoza: A Metaphysician in the Making.Yitzhak Y. Melamed (ed.) - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    Ex nihilo nihil fit. Philosophy, especially great philosophy, does not appear out of the blue. In the current volume, a team of top scholars-both up-and-coming and established-attempts to trace the philosophical development of one of the greatest philosophers of all time. Featuring twenty new essays and an introduction, it is the first attempt of its kind in English and its appearance coincides with the recent surge of interest in Spinoza in Anglo-American philosophy.Spinoza's fame-or notoriety-is due primarily to his posthumously published (...)
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  25. Spinoza's Concept of God: A Critical Exposition of His Doctrine of Substance.Charl Francois Van Der Merwe - 1987 - Dissertation, University of Pretoria (South Africa)
    Spinoza's philosophy is the result of both his rationalism and his mysticism. ;Spinoza the mystic is represented by the insistence upon the non-duality of reality. The eternity of the human mind, the "amor Dei intellectualis" and "scientia intuitiva" are to various degrees tinged by mysticism. ;The analysis of the concept of God is rationalistic. So is the importance of causality in Spinozism. In Spinozism God and substance are identical. ;Spinozism is an alternative to Judaeo-Christian dualism. Spinoza's concept of man is (...)
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  26. The Concept of the Order of Nature in the Philosophy of Spinoza: An Analysis From the Perspective of Justus Buchler's Ordinal Metaphysics.Gary Finn - 2000 - Dissertation, The Union Institute
    This dissertation examined Spinoza's concept of the order of nature in light of Justus Buchler's meta-analytic critique of the idea of the order of nature. Four sets of defining criteria for any viable concept of the order nature were presented in Buchler's metaphysical analysis: Things cannot be conceived of as existing in nature; Nature is not subject to an inherent teleological principle; There is no supervening order of nature or Order of Orders; and Nature cannot be interpreted exclusively as either (...)
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  27. Spinoza's Concept of Power.Richard Reilly - 1994 - Dissertation, Rice University
    Power, according to Spinoza, is God's essence. Hence understanding Spinoza's thoughts about power will help us understand Spinoza's God. Since Spinoza's metaphysics is the foundation for his ethics, this understanding will provide insights into the latter as well. ;I begin by examining Spinoza's interpretation of Descartes. This has God outside the universe recreating it each moment; otherwise it would cease to exist. Spinoza concludes that all events exist solely through God's power; neither minds nor bodies have power of their own. (...)
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  28. Substance and Attribute. [REVIEW]Hugh Chandler - 1980 - Philosophical Review 89 (2):317-320.
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  29. Gersonides and Spinoza on God’s Knowledge of Universals and Particulars.Yitzhak Melamed - forthcoming - In Gad Freudenthal, David Wirmer & Ofer Elior (eds.), Gersonides Through the Ages.
  30. Spinoza's Thinking Substance and the Necessity of Modes.Karolina Hübner - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (3):3-34.
    The paper offers a new account of Spinoza's conception of “substance”, the fundamental building block of reality. It shows that it can be demonstrated apriori within Spinoza's metaphysical framework that (i) contrary to Idealist readings, for Spinoza there can be no substance that is not determined or modified by some other entity produced by substance; and that (ii) there can be no substance (and hence no being) that is not a thinking substance.
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  31. Spinoza's Parallelism Doctrine and Metaphysical Sympathy.Karolina Hübner - 2015 - In Eric Schliesser Christa Mercer (ed.), Sympathy: Oxford Philosophical Concepts.
    This paper offers a new interpretation of Spinoza's doctrine of parallelism. It argues Spinoza reinterprets the ancient doctrine of metaphysical sympathy among ostensibly disconnected and distant beings in terms of fully intelligible relations of 1) identity between formal and objective reality, and in terms of 2) "real identity," grounded in Spinoza's substance-monism. Finally, the paper argues against the standard reading of mind-body pairs as "numerically identical".
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  32. Spinoza's Unorthodox Metaphysics of the Will.Karolina Hübner - 2013 - In Michael Della Rocca (ed.), The Oxford Handbook to Spinoza.
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  33. Spinoza on Being Human and Human Perfection.Karolina Hübner - 2014 - In Matthew Kisner Andrew Youpa (ed.), Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory.
  34. Spinoza on Negation, Mind-Dependence and the Reality of the Finite.Karolina Hübner - 2015 - In Yitzhak Melamed (ed.), The Young Spinoza: A Metaphysician in the Making. pp. 221-37.
    The article explores the idea that according to Spinoza finite thought and substantial thought represent reality in different ways. It challenges “acosmic” readings of Spinoza's metaphysics, put forth by readers like Hegel, according to which only an infinite, undifferentiated substance genuinely exists, and all representations of finite things are illusory. Such representations essentially involve negation with respect to a more general kind. The article shows that several common responses to the charge of acosmism fail. It then argues that we must (...)
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  35. Symposium on Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Spinoza’s Metaphysics,.Yitzhak Melamed - 2013 - Leibniz Review 23:207-222.
  36. Hasdai Crescas and Spinoza on Actual Infinity and the Infinity of God’s Attributes.Yitzhak Melamed - 2014 - In Steven Nadler (ed.), Spinoza and Jewish Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 204-215.
    The seventeenth century was an important period in the conceptual development of the notion of the infinite. In 1643, Evangelista Torricelli (1608-1647)—Galileo’s successor in the chair of mathematics in Florence—communicated his proof of a solid of infinite length but finite volume. Many of the leading metaphysicians of the time, notably Spinoza and Leibniz, came out in defense of actual infinity, rejecting the Aristotelian ban on it, which had been almost universally accepted for two millennia. Though it would be another two (...)
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  37. The Principle of Sufficient Reason in Spinoza.Martin Lin - 2017 - In Michael Della Rocca (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Spinoza. New York:
  38. Spinoza Contra Phenomenology: French Rationalism From Cavaillès to Deleuze.Knox Peden - 2014 - Stanford University Press.
    Spinoza Contra Phenomenology fundamentally recasts the history of postwar French thought, typically presumed to have been driven by a critique of reason indebted to Nietzsche and Heidegger. Although the reception of phenomenology gave rise to many innovative developments in French philosophy, from existentialism to deconstruction, not everyone in France was pleased with this German import. This book recounts how a series of French philosophers used Spinoza to erect a bulwark against the nominally irrationalist tendencies of phenomenology. From its beginnings in (...)
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  39. Review: Lord, Kant and Spinoza: Transcendental Idealism and Immanence From Jacobi to Deleuze. [REVIEW]Colin Tyler - 2011 - Kantian Review 16 (3):3.
  40. Spinoza's Anti-Humanism: An Outline.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2011 - In Smith Justin & Fraenkel Carlos (eds.), The Rationalists. Springer/Synthese. pp. 147--166.
  41. Spinoza's Conatus as an Essence Preserving, Attribute-Neutral Immanent Cause: Toward a New Interpretation of Attributes and Modes.Eric Schliesser - 2011 - In Keith Allen & Tom Stoneham (eds.), Causation and Modern Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 3--65.
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  42. Substance Et Attribute Chez Spinoza.R. Glausier - 1994 - Studia Philosophica 53:225-247.
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  43. La causalité adéquate chez Spinoza.Lee C. Rice - 1992 - Philosophiques 19 (1):45-49.
    L’objectif de cet article est de proposer une analyse de deux conceptions distinctes de la causalité chez Spinoza. Selon la première la nature-dieu serait la cause directe de toute action qui a lieu au niveau des choses finies; tandis que, selon la seconde toute action finie ferait partie d’une chaîne infinie de causes qui est répandue dans la durée. Je montre que cette causalité-ci n’est ni illusoire ni simplement derivative, contre les suggestions de plusieurs travaux récents sur Spinoza. En deuxième (...)
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  44. Spinoza's Geometry of Power. [REVIEW]John Morrison - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (3):610-613.
    A book review of Valtteri Viljanen's "Spinoza’s Geometry of Power".
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  45. Spinoza on Causation and Power.Francesca di Poppa - 2013 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (3):297-319.
    The purpose of this paper is to argue that, for Spinoza, causation is a more fundamental relation than conceptual connection, and that, in fact, it explains conceptual connection. I will firstly offer a criticism of Michael Della Rocca's 2008 claims that, for Spinoza, causal relations are identical to relations of conceptual dependence and that existence is identical to conceivability. Secondly, I will argue that, for Spinoza, causation is more fundamental than conceptual dependence, offering textual evidence from both Treatise on the (...)
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  46. Spinoza on Universals.Halla Kim - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 16:149-155.
    Spinoza’s stance against “bad” universals is well known but his own view on “good” universals is not obvious. In this paper we examine the ontological status of general terms in Spinoza against the background of his metaphysical ontology. We then move onto his view of universals in his discussions of the three kind of knowledge. I argue that Spinoza’s view may be best characterized as trope-conceptualism. Universals are, considered in things themselves, nothing but tropes, i.e., fully particularized properties of individual (...)
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  47. “Spinoza, Tschirnhaus Et Leibniz: Qu’Est Un Monde?“.Yitzhak Melamed - 2014 - In Raphaële Andrault Pierre-François Moreau (ed.), Spinoza/Leibniz. Rencontres, controverses, réceptions. Presses universitaires de Paris. pp. 85-95.
  48. Spinoza on Composition and Priority.Ghislain Guigon - 2011 - In Philip Goff (ed.), Spinoza on Monism. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This article has two goals: a historical and a speculative one. The historical goal is to offer a coherent account of Spinoza’s view on mereological composition. The speculative goal is to show that Spinoza’s substance monism is distinct from versions of monism that are currently defended in metaphysics and that it deserves the attention of contemporary metaphysicians. Regarding the second goal, two versions of monism are currently defended and discussed in contemporary metaphysics: existence monism according to which there actually exists (...)
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  49. Spinoza’s Theory of Reference and the Origin of the Attributes.Jacob Adler - 1986 - Southwest Philosophy Review 3:40-50.
  50. Substance and Attribute.George Englebretsen - 1981 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 28:338-341.
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