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  1. added 2020-06-30
    The Three Final Doctrines of Spinoza: Intuition, Amor Dei, the Eternity of the Mind.Michaela Petrufova Joppova - 2020 - Pro-Fil 21 (1):41-50.
    The study deals with the matter of three of the most puzzling doctrines of Baruch Spinoza's system, the so-called 'final doctrines', which are intuitive knowledge, intellectual love of God, and the eternity of the (human) mind. Contrary to many commentators, but also in concordance with many others, this account strives to affirm the utmost importance of these doctrines to Spinoza's system as a whole, but mostly to his ethical theory. Focusing specifically on the cultivation of the human mind, the paper (...)
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  2. added 2020-06-15
    Spinozian Consequentialism of Ethics of Social Consequences.Michaela Petrufová Joppová - 2018 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 8 (1-2):41-50.
    The present article deals with specific normative concepts of Spinoza’s ethical system and compares them to certain aspects of the theory of ethics of social consequences. At first, a way to approach the problem of normativity in Spinoza is presented, concentrating on the obligatory character of rational - or intellectual - motives. Then, theoretical evidence is presented which links Spinoza to normative-ethical consequentialism. The basis for a consequentialist model of Spinoza’s ethics is the concept of perfection, and on this basis (...)
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  3. added 2020-06-15
    Change and the Eternal Part of the Mind in Spinoza.Michael Lebuffe - 2010 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):369-384.
    Spinoza insists that we can during the course of our lives increase that part of the mind that is constituted by knowledge, but he also calls that part of the mind its eternal part. How can what is eternal increase? I defend an interpretation on which there is a sense in which the eternal part of the mind can become greater without changing intrinsically at all.
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  4. added 2020-06-15
    Perfection, Power and the Passions in Spinoza and Leibniz.Brandon C. Look - 2007 - Revue Roumaine de la Philosophie 51 (1-2):21-38.
    In a short piece written most likely in the 1690s and given the title by Loemker of “On Wisdom,” Leibniz says the following: “...we see that happiness, pleasure, love, perfection, being, power, freedom, harmony, order, and beauty are all tied to each other, a truth which is rightly perceived by few.”1 Why is this? That is, why or how are these concepts tied to each other? And, why have so few understood this relation? Historians of philosophy are familiar with the (...)
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  5. added 2020-06-15
    Psychotherapy and Moral Perfection: Spinoza and the Stoics on the Prospect of Happiness.Firmin DeBrabander - 2004 - In Steven K. Strange & Jack Zupko (eds.), Stoicism: Traditions and Transformations. Cambridge University Press. pp. 198--213.
  6. added 2020-06-15
    The Relation Between Life, Conatus, and Virtue in Spinoza’s Philosophy.Sylvain Zac - 1996 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 19 (1):151-173.
    In order to further clarify the meaning of Spinoza’s teachings, I will demonstrate in the following article that, according to the author of the Ethics, God is life, that the conatus, the internal dynamism of all singular things, are the manifestations of the life of God in different degrees, in the infinity of his modes relating to the infinity of his attributes, that virtue, the most perfect form of the conatus in man, is the “true life,” participation in the life (...)
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  7. added 2020-06-15
    Spinoza’s Theory of Perfection and Goodness.John Campbell - 1980 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 18 (3):259-274.
  8. added 2019-10-14
    Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory.Benedict E. Rumbold - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (5):1000-1003.
    Review of Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory edited by MJ Kisner and A Youpa.
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  9. added 2019-04-04
    Spinozistic Perfectionism.Michael LeBuffe - forthcoming - History of Philosophy Quarterly.
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  10. added 2019-04-04
    Perfection and Desire: Spinoza on the Good.Matthew J. Kisner - 2010 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):97-117.
    While Spinoza claims that our good is both what increases our essential power and what helps us to satisfy our desires, he admits that people desire things that do not increase their power. This paper addresses this problem by arguing that Spinoza conceives of desires as expressions of our conatus , so that satisfying our desires necessarily increases our power and vice versa. This reading holds, in opposition to recent work, that Spinoza upholds a desire-satisfaction theory of the good, though (...)
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  11. added 2019-02-28
    Spinoza on Being Human and Human Perfection.Karolina Hübner - 2014 - In Matthew Kisner Andrew Youpa (ed.), Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory.
  12. added 2016-03-08
    Spinoza as an Exemplar of Foucault’s Spirituality and Technologies of the Self.Christopher Davidson - 2015 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 4 (2):111-146.
    Practices of the self are prominent in Spinoza, both in the Ethics and On the Emendation of the Intellect. The same can be said of Descartes, e.g., his Discourse on the Method. What, if anything, distinguishes their practices of the self? Michel Foucault’s concept of “spirituality” isolates how Spinoza ’s practices are relatively unusual in the early modern era. Spirituality, as defined by Foucault in The Hermeneutics of the Subject, requires changes in the ethical subject before one can begin philosophizing, (...)
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