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  1. added 2017-03-06
    Memory and Personal Identity in Spinoza.Martin Lin - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (2):243-268.
    Locke is often thought to have introduced the topic of personal identity into philosophy when, in the second edition of the Essay, he distinguished the person from both the human being and the soul. Each of these entities differs from the others with respect to their identity conditions, and so they must be ontologically distinct. In particular, Locke claimed, a person cannot survive total memory loss, although a human being or a soul can.
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  2. added 2017-01-24
    Do Persons Follow From Spinoza's God?J. Thomas Cook - 1992 - The Personalist Forum 8 (Supplement):243-248.
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  3. added 2015-01-30
    Death and Destruction in Spinoza's Ethics.Wallace Matson - 1977 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 20 (1-4):403 – 417.
    An exposition of Spinoza's views of the cause and cure of death. He holds death to be disruption of mind/body which need not involve becoming a corpse; amnesia counts. It follows that his criterion of personal identity includes memory, so Spinozistic immortality is impersonal. The cause of death is always something external, for nothing can destroy itself. (This principle, however, is not universally true; Spinoza was led to it by mistaken physics.) Suicide is irrational. Fear of death is to be (...)
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  4. added 2015-01-06
    Personal Identity in Spinoza.Ruth L. Saw - 1969 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 12 (1-4):1 – 14.
    Spinoza's avowed aim is to discover and present the essential stages in achieving the life of human blessedness. The most important element in this progression is knowledge, of one's own nature as man, and of one's place in the universe. Utility as opposed to truth of belief will not serve Spinoza's purpose. Spinoza assumes the unity of the human individual without question, and it is doubtful whether this assumption is justified on his own principles. The concept of the human individual (...)
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