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Summary Roughly speaking, research on Spinoza's philosophy of mind concerns the nature of the mind, its elements, and its mechanisms -- i.e., what it is, what its parts are, and how it works. The papers under the first category -- the nature of the mind -- therefore concern the mind-body problem, broadly construed, which relates in Spinoza to mind-body parallelism and panpsychism, as well as the issue of consciousness. Topics of personal identity and the mind's eternity are also discussed. The second category concerns particular elements of Spinoza's psychological theory, including ideas, imagination, reason and intuition. The third category herein explores how the mind works; such papers therefore explore the conatus, or essential striving, of the mind, as well as the dynamics of the affects.
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  1. [SK] Od patetiky k etike. Spinozova teória ľudskej slobody [From Pathetics to Ethics. Spinoza's Theory of Human Freedom].Michaela Petrufova Joppova - 2022 - Prešov, Slovensko: Atény nad Torysou.
    The monograph offers an original account of Spinoza’s philosophy and ethics concentrated on its concordance with selected modern neuroscientific theories. The book proceeds through the whole of Spinoza’s philosophy and by increasingly complex analytical account acquaints with its essential frameworks, terminology, and concepts, and is thus accessible also to readers who are not yet familiar with the thought of this peculiar thinker. The fundamental motives of this interpretation are the nature of the mind and the questions of human freedom and (...)
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  2. Spinoza on the Distinction Between Substance and Attribute.Antonio Salgado Borge - 2022 - Philosophy 97 (2):207-231.
    I examine Spinoza's claim in the Metaphysical Thoughts that the attributes of God are only distinguished by a distinction of reason. I contend that for Spinoza essential attributes, such as Thought or Extension, cannot be distinguished by Francisco Suarez's distinction of reasoning reason, as Martin Lin suggests, nor can he be using Suárez’ distinction of reasoned reason for this purpose, as Yitzhak Melamed believes. Since reasoning reason and the distinction of reasoned reason are the only two kinds of rational distinction (...)
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  3. Spinozistic Expression as Signification.Antonio Salgado Borge - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 30 (1):24-47.
    I propose a new interpretation of Spinoza’s obscure but important concept of ‘expression’. Any account of Spinozistic expression must be able to fulfil two principal requirements. First, it must be...
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  4. Two Problems in Spinoza's Theory of Mind.James Van Cleve - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Mind.
    My aim in what follows is to expound and (if possible) resolve two problems in Spinoza’s theory of mind. The first problem is how Spinoza can accept a key premise in Descartes’s argument for dualism—that thought and extension are separately conceivable, “one without the help of the other”—without accepting Descartes’s conclusion that no substance is both thinking and extended. Resolving this problem will require us to consider a crucial ambiguity in the notion of conceiving one thing without another, the credentials (...)
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  5. Spinoza's Rejection of Teleology.Edward Andrew Greetis - 2010 - Revista Conatus - Filosofia de Spinoza 4 (8):25-35.
  6. Spinoza and Counterpossible Inferences.Galen Barry - 2021 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 102.
    Spinoza reasons about impossibilities on a regular basis. But he also says they're unthinkable and that reasoning is a mental process. How can he do this? The paper defends a linguistic account of counterpossible inferences in Spinoza's geometrical method.
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  7. 'An Activity Whereby the Mind Regards Itself': Spinoza on Consciousness.Michaela Petrufova Joppova - 2018 - Pro-Fil 19 (2):2-11.
    Baruch Spinoza’s philosophy of mind stirs up the disputes about the nature of body-mind relations with its rigorous and naturalistic monism. The unity of body and mind is consequential of his metaphysics of the substance, but the concept of the unity of the mind and its idea rightfully confuses Spinoza’s commentators. Many have been tempted to interpret this as a possible account of consciousness, but it still has not yet been fully understood. This paper attempts to introduce an interpretation of (...)
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  8. Review of Don Garrett, Necessity and Nature in Spinoza (Oxford University Press, 2018). The Philosophical Review 129 (2020). [REVIEW]Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2020 - Philosophical Review 129 (3):469-473.
  9. Individuation and Death in Spinoza’s Ethics: The Spanish Poet Case Reconsidered.Davide Monaco - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (5):941-958.
    The example of the Spanish poet’s amnesia, mentioned by Spinoza in the scholium of proposition 39 of part IV of the Ethics in order to elucidate his conception of death, has given rise to many controversies in the scholarly interpretations, which in most cases maintain that the poet dies and that Spinoza himself thought this way. However, the matter is more complex than it at first appears and in this article I take a different path by reconstructing this scholium anew (...)
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  10. Power Freedom and Relational Autonomy.Ericka Tucker - 2021 - In Aurelia Armstrong, Keith Green & Andrea Sangiacomo (eds.), Spinoza and Relational Autonomy. Edinburgh, UK: pp. 149-163.
    In recent years, the notion of relational autonomy has transformed the old debate about the freedom of the individual in society. For Spinoza, individual humans are embedded in natural, social and political circumstances from which they derive their power and freedom. I take this to mean that Spinoza’s is best described as a constitutive theory of relational autonomy. I will show how by defining freedom in terms of power, Spinoza understands individual freedom as irreducibly relational. I propose that Spinoza develops (...)
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  11. Affirmation, Judgment, and Epistemic Theodicy in Descartes and Spinoza.Martin Lin - 2019 - In Brian Ball & Christoph Schuringa (eds.), The Act and Object of Judgment. New York: Routledge.
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  12. Ractatus de Intellectus Emendatione. [REVIEW]Benedict de Spinoza - 1895 - Ancient Philosophy (Misc) 6:617.
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  13. Spinoza's Psychology and Social Psychology.Étienne Balibar - 1992
  14. L'automa spirituale. La teoria della mente e delle passioni in Spinoza.Sergio Cremaschi - 1979 - Milan, Metropolitan City of Milan, Italy: Vita e Pensiero.
    Preface -/- 1. 'Anima' and 'res cogitans'. The Cartesian idea of nature and mind as a residual concept. The first chapter discusses the genesis of the concept of mind in Cartesian Philosophy; the claim is advanced that 'res cogitans' is a residual concept, defined on the basis of a previous definition of matter as 'res extensa'. As a consequence, a contradictory ontology of the mind is Descartes's poisoned bequest to the following tradition of 'scientific' psychology. -/- 2. The Mathematical method (...)
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  15. Spinoza's Version of the Eternity of the Mind.Genevieve Lloyd - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 211--233.
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  16. Explicable Explainers: The Problem of Mental Dispositions in Spinoza’s Ethics.Ursula Renz - 2009 - In Debating Dispositions: Issues in Metaphysics, Epistemology and Philosophy of Mind. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 79-98.
  17. Spinoza's Geometry of Power. [REVIEW]John Morrison - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (3):610-613.
    A book review of Valtteri Viljanen's "Spinoza’s Geometry of Power".
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  18. Spinoza, by Alan Donagan.Don Garrett - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (4):952-955.
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  19. Spinoza and Mental Health.Paul Wienpahl - 1972 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 15 (1-4):64 – 94.
    With the proviso that Spinoza's concerns were philosophical, not medical, we examine the Ethics with a view to bringing out those aspects of it which are of import for mental health. We find that the Ethics surrounds the idea that man can be egoless in the Buddhist sense of that term. This concept provides a criterion of mental health. Further, according to Spinoza's theory of the Affections, those which are passive include some which are based on pain. These he 'enumerates (...)
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  20. Rationalism Run Amok: Representation and the Reality of Emotions in Spinoza.Michael Della Rocca - 2008 - In Charles Huenemann (ed.), Interpreting Spinoza: Critical Essays. Cambridge University Press.
Spinoza: Affects
  1. Core Affect Dynamics: Arousal as a Modulator of Valence.Valentina Petrolini & Marco Viola - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 11 (4):783-801.
    According to several researchers, core affect lies at the foundation of our affective lives and may be characterized as a consciously accessible state combining arousal and valence. The interaction between these two dimensions is still a matter of debate. In this paper we provide a novel hypothesis concerning their interaction, by arguing that subjective arousal levels modulate the experience of a stimulus’ affective quality. All things being equal, the higher the arousal, the more a given stimulus would be experienced as (...)
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  2. Descartes and Spinoza on the Primitive Passions.Lisa Shapiro - 2020 - In Noa Naaman-Zauderer (ed.), Freedom, Action, and Motivation in Spinoza's Ethics. Routledge Press. pp. 62-81.
    Motivating my discussion is a puzzle in Spinoza’s account of the primary affects – his shift away from adopting Descartes’s list of six primitive passions in the Short Treatise to the three primary affects in the Ethics. I lay out this puzzle in Section 1. In Section 2, I approach this puzzle by considering the taxonomy offered by Descartes of the basic or primitive passions. In considering Descartes, I will also briefly consider Aquinas’s view since Descartes positions himself as rejecting (...)
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  3. Schopenhauer und Spinozas Affektenlehre.Thorsten Sander - 2002 - In Achim Engstler & Robert Schnepf (eds.), Affekte und Ethik: Spinozas Lehre im Kontext. Hildesheim: Olms. pp. 263-278.
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  4. Affekte und Ethik: Spinozas Lehre im Kontext.Achim Engstler (ed.) - 2002 - Hildesheim: Olms.
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  5. Affective Societies: Key Concepts.Jan Slaby & Christian von Scheve (eds.) - 2019 - New York: Routledge.
    Affect and emotion have come to dominate discourse on social and political life in the mobile and networked societies of the early 21st century. This volume introduces a unique collection of essential concepts for theorizing and empirically investigating societies as Affective Societies. The concepts engender insights into the affective foundations of social coexistence and are indispensable to comprehend the many areas of conflict linked to emotion such as migration, political populism, or local and global inequalities. Each chapters provides historical orientation; (...)
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  6. Affekt Macht Netz. Auf dem Weg zu einer Sozialtheorie der Digitalen Gesellschaft (Hg. Breljak/ Mühlhoff/ Slaby).Rainer Mühlhoff, Anja Breljak & Jan Slaby (eds.) - 2019 - Bielefeld: transcript.
    -/- Shitstorms, Hate Speech oder virale Videos, die zum Klicken, Liken, Teilen bewegen: Die vernetzte Gesellschaft ist von Affekten getrieben und bringt selbst ganz neue Affekte hervor. -/- Die Beiträge des Bandes nehmen die medientechnologischen Entwicklungen unserer Zeit in den Blick und untersuchen sie aus der Perspektive einer kritischen Affekt- und Sozialphilosophie. Sie zeigen: Soziale Medien und digitale Plattformen sind nicht nur Räume des Austauschs, sie erschaffen Affektökonomien – und darin liegt auch ihre Macht. Indem sie neue Formen des sozialen (...)
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  7. Necessity and the Commands of Reason in the Ethics.Michael LeBuffe - 2014 - In Matthew Kisner & Andrew Youpa (eds.), Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory. pp. 197 - 220.
    This essay focuses on Spinoza’s claim that ideas of reason are necessary. While Spinoza understands necessity to imply that something cannot be otherwise, the author shows that Spinoza employs a narrower notion of necessity that applies only to some things, what LeBuffe describes as omnipresence: existing at all times and in all places. This account of the sense in which the ideas of reason are necessary makes evident that such ideas have especially strong motivational power. Our affects are more powerful (...)
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  8. From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence.Michael LeBuffe - 2010 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Spinoza rejects fundamental tenets of received morality, including the notions of Providence and free will. Yet he retains rich theories of good and evil, virtue, perfection, and freedom. Building interconnected readings of Spinoza's accounts of imagination, error, and desire, Michael LeBuffe defends a comprehensive interpretation of Spinoza's enlightened vision of human excellence. Spinoza holds that what is fundamental to human morality is the fact that we find things to be good or evil, not what we take those designations to mean. (...)
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  9. The Ontological Status of the Affects in Spinoza's Metaphysics: "Being in," "Affection of," and the Affirmation of Finitude.Avraham Rot - 2017 - Review of Metaphysics 71 (4).
    The article examines the relation between two kinds of ontological relations that hold together the building blocks of Spinoza’s metaphysics: “being in” and “affection of.” It argues that in order to speak of existence in a single sense, Spinoza equivocates on the notion of affection. On the one hand, substance is in itself in the same sense that every other existing thing is in substance. On the other hand, substance is not the affections of itself, affections of substance are not (...)
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  10. (Non-)Belief in Things: Affect Theory and A New Literary Materialism.Neil Vallelly - 2019 - In Stephen Ahern (ed.), A Feel for the Text: Affect Theory and Literary Critical Practice. New York, NY, USA: pp. 45-63.
    This chapter argues that contemporary literary criticism suffers from a reflexive faith in things, conceived broadly as static objects that reflect wider political, social, and cultural practices. Literature is re-imagined here as an open-ended event that demands an immanent materialism in which distinctions between literary objects and human bodies no longer stand up. By reflecting on the ambiguous “thing-ness” of Shakespeare, Vallelly draws attention to the elusive nature of things in theatrical spaces, and explores how this enigmatic materiality can be (...)
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  11. Depression and the Emotions: An Argument for Cultivating Cheerfulness.Derek McAllister - 2018 - Philosophia 46 (3):771-784.
    In this paper, I offer an argument for cultivating cheerfulness as a remedy to sadness and other emotions, which, in turn, can provide some relief to certain cases of depression. My thesis has two tasks: first, to establish the link between cheerfulness and sadness, and second, to establish the link between sadness and depression. In the course of accomplishing the first task, I show that a remedy of cultivating cheerfulness to counter sadness is supported by philosophers as diverse as Thomas (...)
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  12. Spinoza, Ecology, and Immanent Ethics: Beside Moral Considerability.Oli Stephano - 2017 - Environmental Philosophy 14 (2):317-338.
    This paper develops an immanent ecological ethics that locates human flourishing within sustaining ecological relationships. I outline the features of an immanent ethics drawn from Spinoza, and indicate how this model addresses gaps left by approaches based in moral considerability. I argue that an immanent ecological ethics provides unique resources for contesting anthropogenic harm, by 1) shifting the focus from what qualifies as a moral subject to what bodies can or cannot do under particular relations, 2) emphasizing the constitutive role (...)
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  13. Is Spinoza’s Theory of Finite Mind Coherent? – Death, Affectivity and Epistemology in the Ethics.Oliver Istvan Toth - 2017 - The Concept of Affectivity in Early Modern Philosophy.
    In this paper I examine the question whether Spinoza can account for the necessity of death. I argue that he cannot because within his ethical intellectualist system the subject cannot understand the cause of her death, since by understanding it renders it harmless. Then, I argue that Spinoza could not solve this difficulties because of deeper commitments of his system. At the end I draw a historical parallel to the problem from medieval philosophy.
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  14. Spinoza on Emotion and Akrasia.Christiaan Remmelzwaal - 2016 - Dissertation, Université de Neuchatel
    The objective of this doctoral dissertation is to interpret the explanation of akrasia that the Dutch philosopher Benedictus Spinoza (1632-1677) gives in his work The Ethics. One is said to act acratically when one intentionally performs an action that one judges to be worse than another action which one believes one might perform instead. In order to interpret Spinoza’s explanation of akrasia, a large part of this dissertation investigates Spinoza’s theory of emotion. The first chapter is introductory and outlines Spinoza’s (...)
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  15. The Psychology and Ethics of Spinoza: A Study in the History and Logic of Ideas.Marjorie Grene - 1940 - Ethics 50 (4):464-470.
  16. Spinoza’s Theory of Human Freedom.Stuart Hampshire - 1971 - The Monist 55 (4):554-566.
    Stimulated by the other contributors to this issue, I return to Spinoza’s philosophy of mind and to the account of freedom of mind which he considered compatible with the thesis of determinism.
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  17. Affect, Desire, and Judgement in Spinoza's Account of Motivation.Justin Steinberg - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (1):67-87.
    Two priority problems frustrate our understanding of Spinoza on desire [cupiditas]. The first problem concerns the relationship between desire and the other two primary affects, joy [laetitia] and sadness [tristitia]. Desire seems to be the oddball of this troika, not only because, contrary to the very definition of an affect, desires do not themselves consist in changes in one's power of acting, but also because desire seems at once more and less basic than joy and sadness. The second problem concerns (...)
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  18. Frédéric Lordon. Willing Slaves of Capital: Spinoza and Marx on Desire., Trans., Gabriel Ash. London: Verso, 2014. 224 Pp. [REVIEW]Abhijeet Paul - 2015 - Critical Inquiry 41 (4):903-904.
  19. 2. Power, Affect, Knowledge: Nietzsche on Spinoza.David Wollenberg - 2015 - In Bartholomew Ryan, Maria Joao Mayer Branco & João Constancio (eds.), Nietzsche and the Problem of Subjectivity. De Gruyter. pp. 65-94.
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  20. Affects and Activity in Leibniz's De Affectibus.Markku Roinila - 2015 - In Adrian Nita (ed.), Leibniz’s Metaphysics and Adoption of Substantial Forms: Between Continuity and Transformation. Springer. pp. 73-88.
    In this paper I will discuss the doctrine of substance which emerges from Leibniz’s unpublished early memoir De affectibus of 1679. The memoir marks a new stage in Leibniz’s views of the mind. The motivation for this change can be found in Leibniz’s rejection of the Cartesian theory of passion and action in the 1670s. His early Aristotelianism and some features of Cartesianism persisted to which Leibniz added influences from Hobbes and Spinoza. His nascent dynamical concept of substance is seemingly (...)
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  21. Animal Affects: Spinoza and the Frontiers of the Human.Hasana Sharp - 2011 - Journal for Critical Animal Studies 9 (1-2):48-68.
    Like any broad narrative about the history of ideas, this one involves a number of simplifications. My hope is that by taking a closer look Spinoza's notorious remarks on animals, we can understand better why it becomes especially urgent in this period as well as our own for philosophers to emphasize a distinction between human and nonhuman animals. In diagnosing the concerns that give rise to the desire to dismiss the independent purposes of animals, we may come to focus on (...)
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  22. Conscience Et Connaissance Experientielle: Le Role des Affects Dans la Progression Ethique Chez Spinoza.Syliane Charles - 2002 - Dissertation, University of Ottawa (Canada)
    La double question a la source de ce travail est la suivante: comment le mecanisme du progres dans la connaissance se deploie-t-il exactement chez Spinoza, et pourquoi ce processus cognitif, relie aux idees qu'on possede, est-il en meme temps un processus ethique, relie a la joie et au bonheur? On constate que le champ de l'ethique n'est pas, a proprement parler, celui de la connaissance, mais celui du progres dans la connaissance, qui s'acheve par une conscience superieure de soi, de (...)
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  23. Affects et conscience chez Spinoza. L'automatisme dans le progres éthique.Syliane Malinowski-Charles - 2006 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 68 (3):662-662.
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  24. The Power of the Affects.Alejandro E. de Acosta - 2002 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Binghamton
    This dissertation concerns the affects, defined as bodily intensities and as pre-personal productive or creative feelings. Here, the affects are not simply passions; they precede the distinction between activity and passivity. These definitions correspond to the intuition expressed in philosophies of time and experience, that something is always happening in or to bodies. According to this intuition, events and processes always pertain to bodies, and what happens to bodies is experienced as affects: corporeal intensities, blocks of lived timespace, which can (...)
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  25. Spinoza, or, The Power of Desire.Camille DumiliÉ - 2003 - Pli 14.
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  26. Healing the Mind. The Philosophy of Spinoza Adapted for a New Age. [REVIEW]Robert Parmach - 2005 - Philosophical Practice 1 (3):189-192.
  27. Radical Cartesian Politics and Spinoza's Change of Mind.Tammy Marie Nyden-Bullock - 2003 - Dissertation, The Claremont Graduate University
    In this dissertation, I trace the development of Spinoza's philosophy of mind throughout his corpus. I argue that understanding the development of his thought, as well as its historical context, helps us understand how Spinoza's mature system fits together. Owing to the complexity and systematic nature of Spinoza's philosophy, along with the tendency in the literature to study his Ethics in isolation, the importance of such connections for the proper understanding of any particular area of his thought is often overlooked. (...)
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  28. The Susceptibility of Intuitive Knowledge to Akrasia in Spinoza's Ethical Thought.Sanem Soyarslan - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (4):725-747.
    Spinoza unequivocally states in the Ethics that intuitive knowledge is more powerful than reason. Nonetheless, it is not clear what exactly this greater power promises in the face of the passions. Does this mean that intuitive knowledge is not liable to akrasia? Ronald Sandler offers what, to my knowledge, is the only explicit answer to this question in recent Spinoza scholarship. According to Sandler, intuitive knowledge, unlike reason, is not susceptible to akrasia. This is because, intuitive knowledge enables the knower (...)
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  29. The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza’s Science of the Mind by Eugene Marshall.Michael LeBuffe - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):846-847.
  30. Eugene Marshall , The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza’s Science of the Mind . Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Alex Silverman - 2014 - Philosophy in Review 34 (5):251-253.
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