About this topic
Summary Spinoza states that the causal orders found in the attributes of thought and extension are "one and the same."  Hence the common description of Spinoza as endorsing psycho-physical parallelism, or the thesis that the mental and physical realms are isomorphic.  Some of the interpretive questions raised by this thesis are global, such as whether the infinitely complex networks in thought and extension are in fact isomorphic.  Other questions are more local in nature, such as pertaining to the precise structural similarities between the human mind and the human body.  Most interpret Spinoza as holding that the sets of mental and physical things are not merely isomorphic but numerically identical.
Related categories

66 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 66
  1. Reconceiving Spinoza, by Samuel Newlands.Karolina Hübner & Róbert Mátyási - 2020 - Mind 129 (513):307-314.
    Reconceiving Spinoza, by Samuel Newlands. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. x + 283.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. La Metafisica di Spinoza: Sostanza e Pensiero.Yitzhak Melamed - 2020 - Milan: Mimesis Edizioni.
    This is an Italian translation of Spinoza's Metaphysics: Substance and Thought (Oxford UP, 2013).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Spinoza's Theory of the Human Mind: Consciousenss, Memory, and Reason.Oberto Marrama - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Groningen/UQTR
    Spinoza attributes mentality to all things existing in nature. He claims that each thing has a mind that perceives everything that happens in the body. Against this panpsychist background, it is unclear how consciousness relates to the nature of the mind. This study focuses on Spinoza’s account of the conscious mind and its operations. It builds on the hypothesis that Spinoza’s panpsychism can be interpreted as a self-consistent philosophical position. It aims at providing answers to the following questions: what is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Spinoza in Twenty-First-Century American and French Philosophy: Metaphysics, Philosophy of Mind, Moral and Political Philosophy.Jack Stetter & Charles Ramond (eds.) - 2019 - London: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Contributors: Steven Barbone, Laurent Bove, Edwin Curley, Valérie Debuiche, Michael Della Rocca, Simon B. Duffy, Daniel Garber, Pascale Gillot, Céline Hervet, Jonathan Israel, Chantal Jaquet, Mogens Lærke, Jacqueline Lagrée, Martin Lin, Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Pierre-François Moreau, Steven Nadler, Knox Peden, Alison Peterman, Charles Ramond, Michael A. Rosenthal, Pascal Sévérac, Hasana Sharp, Jack Stetter, Ariel Suhamy, Lorenzo Vinciguerra.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Consciousness, Ideas of Ideas and Animation in Spinoza’s Ethics.Oberto Marrama - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (3):506-525.
    In the following article, I aim to elucidate the meaning and scope of Spinoza’s vocabulary related to ‘consciousness’. I argue that Spinoza, at least in his Ethics, uses this notion consistently, although rarely. He introduces it to account for the knowledge we may have of the mind considered alone, as conceptually distinct from the body. This serves two purposes in Spinoza’s Ethics: to explain our illusion of a free will, on the one hand, and to refer to the knowledge we (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. The Nature and Scope of Spinoza's "One and the Same" Relation.Alex Silverman - 2017 - Res Philosophica 94 (4):535-554.
    I argue that we should rethink the nature and scope of Spinoza’s “one and the same” relation. Contrary to the standard reading, the nature of this relation is not identity but a union, and its scope includes all idea-object pairs, even God and the idea of God. A crucial reason we should adopt this dual picture is that the idea of God must be one and the same as something found when Nature is conceived under each of the other attributes. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Spinoza on Negation, Mind-Dependence and the Reality of the Finite.Karolina Hübner - 2015 - In Yitzhak Melamed (ed.), The Young Spinoza: A Metaphysician in the Making. pp. 221-37.
    The article explores the idea that according to Spinoza finite thought and substantial thought represent reality in different ways. It challenges “acosmic” readings of Spinoza's metaphysics, put forth by readers like Hegel, according to which only an infinite, undifferentiated substance genuinely exists, and all representations of finite things are illusory. Such representations essentially involve negation with respect to a more general kind. The article shows that several common responses to the charge of acosmism fail. It then argues that we must (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8. Spinoza's Parallelism Doctrine and Metaphysical Sympathy.Karolina Hübner - 2015 - In Eric Schliesser Christa Mercer (ed.), Sympathy: Oxford Philosophical Concepts.
    This paper offers a new interpretation of Spinoza's doctrine of parallelism. It argues Spinoza reinterprets the ancient doctrine of metaphysical sympathy among ostensibly disconnected and distant beings in terms of fully intelligible relations of 1) identity between formal and objective reality, and in terms of 2) "real identity," grounded in Spinoza's substance-monism. Finally, the paper argues against the standard reading of mind-body pairs as "numerically identical".
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Is There a "Pancreas Problem" in Spinoza’s Theory of the Human Mind?Henk Keizer - 2015 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):65-80.
    This article explores a new reading of an important section of Part II of Spinoza’s Ethics. It recognizes that Spinoza actually differentiates between the human mind conceived from the viewpoint of its cause and the human mind conceived from the viewpoint of its nature. It shows, most importantly, that Spinoza assigns different objects to those ‘minds’. Consequently they represent different knowledge of the body. It will appear that the human mind in respect of its cause represents non-conscious knowledge of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Spinoza on Composition, Causation, and the Mind's Eternity.John Grey - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (3):446-467.
    Spinoza's doctrine of the eternity of the mind is often understood as the claim that the mind has a part that is eternal. I appeal to two principles that Spinoza takes to govern parthood and causation to raise a new problem for this reading. Spinoza takes the composition of one thing from many to require causal interaction among the many. Yet he also holds that eternal things cannot causally interact, without mediation, with things in duration. So the human mind, since (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11. All Things in Mind: Panpsychist Elements in Spinoza, Deleuze, and Peirce. [REVIEW]Jonathan Beever & Vernon Cisney - 2013 - Biosemiotics 6 (3):351-365.
    Benedict de Spinoza, C.S. Peirce, and Gilles Deleuze delineate a trajectory through the history of ideas in the dialogue about the potentials and limitations of panpsychism, the view that world is fundamentally made up of mind. As a parallel trajectory to the panpsychism debate in contemporary philosophy of mind and cognitive psychology, this approach can inform and enrich the discussion of the role and scope of mind in the natural world. The philosophies of mind developed by Deleuze and Peirce are (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Spinoza’s Metaphysics: Substance and Thought by Yitzhak Y. Melamed.Martin Lin - 2013 - The Leibniz Review 23:195-205.
  13. The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza's Science of the Mind.Eugene Marshall - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Eugene Marshall presents an original, systematic account of Spinoza's philosophy of mind, in which the mind is presented as an affective mechanism that, when rational, behaves as a spiritual automaton. He explores key themes in Spinoza's thought, and illuminates his philosophical and ethical project in a striking new way.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  14. Spinoza’s Metaphysics of Thought: Parallelisms and the Multifaceted Structure of Ideas.Yitzak Melamed - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (3):636-683.
    In this paper, I suggest an outline of a new interpretation of core issues in Spinoza’s metaphysics and philosophy of mind. I argue for three major theses. (1) In the first part of the paper I show that the celebrated Spinozistic doctrine commonly termed “the doctrine of parallelism” is in fact a confusion of two separate and independent doctrines of parallelism. Hence, I argue that our current understanding of Spinoza’s metaphysics and philosophy of mind is fundamentally flawed. (2) The clarification (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  15. Symposium on Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Spinoza’s Metaphysics,.Yitzhak Melamed - 2013 - Leibniz Review 23:207-222.
  16. Spinoza's Metaphysics: Substance and Thought.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2013 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Yitzhak Melamed here offers a new and systematic interpretation of the core of Spinoza's metaphysics. In the first part of the book, he proposes a new reading of the metaphysics of substance in Spinoza: he argues that for Spinoza modes both inhere in and are predicated of God. Using extensive textual evidence, he shows that Spinoza considered modes to be God's propria. He goes on to clarify Spinoza's understanding of infinity, mereological relations, infinite modes, and the flow of finite things (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  17. The Relation Between Conception and Causation in Spinoza's Metaphysics.John Morrison - 2013 - Philosophers' Imprint 13:1-17.
    Conception and causation are fundamental notions in Spinoza's metaphysics. I argue against the orthodox view that, due to the causal axiom, if one thing is conceived through another thing, then the second thing causes the first thing. My conclusion forces us to rethink Spinoza's entitlement to some of his core commitments, including the principle of sufficient reason, the parallelism doctrine and the conatus doctrine.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  18. Sartre and Spinoza on the Nature of Mind.Kathleen Wider - 2013 - Continental Philosophy Review 46 (4):555-575.
    What surfaces first when one examines the philosophy of mind of Sartre and Spinoza are the differences between them. For Spinoza a human mind is a mode of the divine mind. That view is a far cry from Sartre’s view of human consciousness as a desire never achieved: the desire to be god, to be the foundation of one’s own existence. How could two philosophers, one a determinist and the other who grounds human freedom in the nature of consciousness itself, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. Beyond Personal Feelings and Collective Emotions: Toward a Theory of Social Affect.R. Seyfert - 2012 - Theory, Culture and Society 29 (6):27-46.
    In the Sociology of Emotion and Affect Studies, affects are usually regarded as an aspect of human beings alone, or of impersonal or collective atmospheres. However, feelings and emotions are only specific cases of affectivity that require subjective inner selves, while the concept of ‘atmospheres’ fails to explain the singularity of each individual case. This article develops a theory of social affect that does not reduce affect to either personal feelings or collective emotions. First, I use a Spinozist understanding of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  20. Intentionality and God’s Mind. Stumpf on Spinoza.R. Martinelli - 2011 - In G.-J. Boudewijnse & S. Bonacchi (eds.), Carl Stumpf: From philosophical reflection to interdisciplinary scientific investigation. Krammer. pp. 51-67.
    In his Spinozastudien Stumpf dismisses the commonplace interpretation of Spinoza’s parallelism in psychophysical terms. Rather, he suggests to read Ethics, II, Prop. 7, as the heritage of the scholastic doctrine of intentionality. Accordingly, things are the intentional objects of God’s ideas. On this basis, Stumpf also tries to make sense of the puzzling spinozian doctrine of the infinity of God’s attributes. In support of this exegesis, Stumpf offers an interesting reconstruction of the history of intentionality from Plato and Aristotle to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. Adequate Knowledge and Bodily Complexity in Spinoza’s Account of Consciousness.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2011 - Methodus 6:77-104.
    This paper aims to discuss Spinoza’s theory of consciousness by arguing that consciousness is the expression of bodily complexity in terms of adequate knowledge. Firstly, I present the link that Spinoza built up in the second part of the Ethics between the ability of the mind to know itself and the idea ideae theory. Secondly, I present in what sense consciousness turns out to be the result of an adequate knowledge emerging from the epistemological resources of a body as complex (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22. Law and Sovereignty in Spinoza's Politics.Susan James - 2009 - In Moira Gatens (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Benedict Spinoza. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 211--28.
    Book synopsis: This volume brings together international scholars working at the intersection of Spinoza studies and critical and feminist philosophy. It is the first book-length study dedicated to the re-reading of Spinoza’s ethical and theologico-political works from a feminist perspective. The twelve outstanding chapters range over the entire field of Spinoza’s writings—metaphysical, political, theological, ethical, and psychological—drawing out the ways in which his philosophy presents a rich resource for the reconceptualization of friendship, sexuality, politics, and ethics in contemporary life. The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. The Mind and the Body as 'One and the Same Thing' in Spinoza.Colin R. Marshall - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (5):897-919.
    I argue that, contrary to how he is often read, Spinoza did not believe that the mind and the body were numerically identical. This means that we must find some alternative reading for his claims that they are 'one and the same thing'.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  24. Partem Totius Naturae Esse: Spinoza’s Alternative to the Mutual Incomprehension of Physicalism and Mentalism in Psychology.William Meehan - 2009 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 29 (1):47-59.
    Spinoza’s account of human agency is presented as a solution to the fundamental dichotomy between physicalism and mentalism in psychology. It is argued that this dichotomy originates in the 17th century with the Cartesian and Hobbesian responses to the collapse of the Scholastic synthesis. Spinoza’s view of nature as equally Mind and Body, and his understanding of efficient causality as grounded in a self-caused natural totality are described. Spinozism’s relative lack of influence on contemporary scientific culture is attributed to his (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. On the Reconciliation of the Spinozistic Doctrines of the Eternality of the Mind and Monistic Parallelism.Robyn Gaier - 2008 - Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (1):211-218.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. The Union and Interaction of Mind and Body.Paul Hoffman - 2008 - In A Companion to Descartes. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 390--403.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27. Begriffliche und psychologische Ordnung bei Spinoza.Dominik Perler - 2008 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 90 (2):188-215.
    Spinoza's metaphysical thesis that there is only one substance in the universe but a plurality of modes, each of them falling under an attribute, raises a crucial question. How are modes of thinking, i.e. ideas, related to modes of extension? This paper intends to show that there are at least two answers, depending on an understanding of the equivocal term ‘idea’. If ideas are taken to be mental acts, they are identical with modes of extension. If, however, they are understood (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. Spinoza.Michael Della Rocca - 2008 - New York: Routlege.
    Spinoza ' s understanding and understanding Spinoza -- Spinoza ' s understanding -- Understanding Spinoza -- The metaphysics of substance -- Descartes and substance -- Spinoza contra Descartes on substance -- Modes -- Necessitarianism -- The purpose of it all -- The human mind -- Parallelism and representation -- Essence and representation -- Parallelism and mind - body identity -- The idea of the human body -- The pancreas problem, the pan problem, and panpsychism -- Nothing but representation -- Representation, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   54 citations  
  29. The Status of Consciousness in Spinoza's Concept of Mind.Jon Miller - 2007 - In Consciousness: From Perception to Reflection in the History of Philosophy. Springer.
    Let me start with my conclusions: like most other philosophers of his era, Spinoza did not have well-developed views on consciousness and its place in the mind. Somewhat paradoxically, however, a basic tenet of his metaphysics generated a problem which might have been solved if he had thought more about those issues. So in the end, then, Spinoza did not have much to say about consciousness even though the coherency or at least the plausibility of his system demanded it. With (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  30. Spinoza’s Radical Cartesian Mind.Tammy Nyden - 2007 - Continuum.
    Seventeenth-century Holland was a culture divided. Orthodox Calvinists, loyal to both scholastic philosophy and the quasi-monarchical House of Orange, saw their world turned upside down with the sudden death of Prince William II and no heir to take his place. The Republicans seized this opportunity to create a decentralized government favourable to Holland's trading interests and committed to religious and philosophical tolerance. The now ruling regent class, freshly trained in the new philosophy of Descartes, used it as a weapon to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. Teleology and Human Action in Spinoza.Martin Lin - 2006 - Philosophical Review 115 (3):317-354.
    Cover Date: July 2006.Source Info: 115(3), 317-354. Language: English. Journal Announcement: 41-2. Subject: ACTION; CAUSATION; METAPHYSICS; REPRESENTATION; TELEOLOGY. Subject Person: SPINOZA, BENEDICT DE (BARUCH). Update Code: 20130315.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  32. Spinoza and Materialism.Susan James - 2005 - In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Current Continental Theory and Modern Philosophy. Northwestern University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Aristotle and Descartes in Spinoza’s Approach to Matter and Body.Julie R. Klein - 2005 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 26 (2):157-176.
    Considered in its seventeenth-century context, Spinoza’s way of thinking about substance and nature is striking for its simultaneous refusal of Cartesian dualism and Hobbesian materialism. Spinoza knew both thinkers’ work well, yet sided with neither. Where Descartes divides substance into thinking and extended substance, and where Hobbes reduces all things to body, Spinoza espouses what is best called a double-aspect or non-reductive monism. The single substance of the Ethics is expressed as an infinity of modes in an infinity of attributes, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Spinoza on Mind and Body.J. Thomas Cook & Lee Rice - 2003
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Radical Cartesian Politics and Spinoza's Change of Mind.Tammy Marie Nyden-Bullock - 2003 - Dissertation, The Claremont Graduate University
    In this dissertation, I trace the development of Spinoza's philosophy of mind throughout his corpus. I argue that understanding the development of his thought, as well as its historical context, helps us understand how Spinoza's mature system fits together. Owing to the complexity and systematic nature of Spinoza's philosophy, along with the tendency in the literature to study his Ethics in isolation, the importance of such connections for the proper understanding of any particular area of his thought is often overlooked. (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Spinoza’s Anticipation of Contemporary Affective Neuroscience.H. M. Ravven - 2003 - Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):257-290.
    Spinoza speculated on how ethics could emerge from biology and psychology rather than disrupt them and recent evidence suggests he might have gotten it right. His radical deconstruction and reconstruction of ethics is supported by a number of avenues of research in the cognitive and neurosciences. This paper gathers together and presents a composite picture of recent research that supports Spinoza’s theory of the emotions and of the natural origins of ethics. It enumerates twelve naturalist claims of Spinoza that now (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37. Representation and the Mind-Body Problem in Spinoza. [REVIEW]Don Garrett - 2000 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (1):223-226.
    Michael Della Rocca’s marvelous book is devoted to Spinoza’s treatment of two topics—mental representation and the relation of mind to body—that are central to much of Spinoza’s philosophy. Della Rocca has clearly read Spinoza with extraordinary care, sensitivity, and insight. His writing is remarkably lucid, his argumentation is almost always compelling, and his care in spelling out exactly what he thinks does and does not follow—both from Spinoza’s philosophical arguments and from his own interpretive ones—is exemplary. The result is a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. The Sage Meets the Zombie: Spinoza's Wise Man and Chalmers' The Conscious Mind.Charles Huenemann - 1998 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 14:21-33.
  39. Representation and the Mind-Body Problem in Spinoza.Richard N. Manning - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (4):603.
    In this book, Della Rocca traces out the conceptual links between key concepts and principles of Spinoza's system bearing on representation and the mind-body problem. In the course of doing so, he presents and defends a number of new, interesting theses about Spinoza's thought on these matters. The arguments are presented with impressive clarity and in great detail. All in all, the book is a significant contribution to the literature on Spinoza's metaphysics and epistemology, and should be read by anyone (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  40. Consciousness, Representation, Thought and Extension: An Interpretation of Monistic Parallelism in the Philosophy of Baruch Spinoza.Vijay Mascarenhas - 1998 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 14:92-110.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Causality, Intensionality and Identity: Mind Body Interaction in Spinoza.Olli Koistinen - 1996 - Ratio 9 (1):23-38.
  42. The Co-Extensiveness of the Attributes in Spinoza.Frank Lucash - 1996 - Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (2):51-61.
  43. Representation and the Mind-Body Problem in Spinoza.Michael Della Rocca - 1995 - Oup Usa.
    Della Rocca concentrates on two problems crucial to Spinoza 's philosophy of mind: the requirements for having a thought about a particular object, and the problem of the mind's relation to the body. He contends that for Spinoza these two problems are linked and thus part of a systematic philosophy of mind.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  44. Representation and the Mind-Body Problem in Spinoza.Michael Della Rocca - 1995 - Oxford University Press.
    This first extensive study of Spinoza's philosophy of mind concentrates on two problems crucial to the philosopher's thoughts on the matter: the requirements for having a thought about a particular object, and the problem of the mind's relation to the body. Della Rocca contends that Spinoza's positions are systematically connected with each other and with a principle at the heart of his metaphysical system: his denial of causal or explanatory relations between the mental and the physical. In this way, Della (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  45. Mind, Body & Ethics in Spinoza.Peter Winch - 1995 - Philosophical Investigations 18 (3):216-234.
  46. Spinoza's Argument for the Identity Theory.Michael Della Rocca - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (2):183.
  47. Spinoza on Knowledge and the Human Mind: Papers Presented at the Second Jerusalem Conference.Yirmiyahu Yovel & Gideon Segal (eds.) - 1993 - Brill.
    Truth, adequacy and error, the Mind-Body relation and the meaning of "having" an idea are issues still at the center of philosophical debate. Spinoza belongs to those past masters whose work always inspires renewed insights on these as on other philosophical issues. This volume revolves around Part II of Spinoza's _opus magnum_, the _Ethics_ where he offers his theory of knowledge and the human mind. Stuart Hampshire writes about "Truth and Correspondence"; Alexandre Matheron discusses "Ideas of Ideas and Certainty"; Alan (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. The Activity and Passivity of the Mind and Body.Frank Lucash - 1992 - Philosophical Inquiry 14 (1-2):11-23.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. "The Materiality of Morals: Mind, Body and Interest in Spinoza's" Ethics".Andrew Collier - 1991 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 7:69-93.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. Spinoza’s Denial of Mind-Body Interaction and the Explanation of Human Action.Charles Jarrett - 1991 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 29 (4):465-485.
1 — 50 / 66