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  1. Spinoza and the Election of the Hebrews.Yitzhak Melamed - forthcoming - In Michael A. Rosenthal (ed.), Spinoza & Modern Jewish Philosophy. Palgrave.
    Spinoza’s interpretation of the election of the Hebrews in the third chapter of the Theological Political Treatise enraged quite a few Jewish readers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The rise of nationalism, and the demand of loyalty to one’s own genos brought about a certain style of patriotic writing aimed at Spinoza’s “betrayal.” In a series of lectures on the eve of the Great War, Hermann Cohen portrayed Spinoza as a person of “demonic spirt” and as “the great enemy (...)
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  2. The Doctrine of the Two Kingdoms: Miracles, Monotheism, and Reason in Spinoza.Michael LeBuffe - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (2):318-332.
    Spinoza insists in the Theological Political Treatise that philosophy and theology are two separate kingdoms. I argue here that there is a basis in the psychology of the Ethics for one of the major components of the doctrine of the two kingdoms. Under the kingdom of theology, religion's principal function is to overcome the influence of harmful passion that prevents people from living life according to a fixed plan: people can live according to a fixed plan because they can obey. (...)
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  3. Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion, and Politics, by Susan James (Review). [REVIEW]Eugene Marshall - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (2):318-319.
    Event synopsis: Professor Susan James inverses Leo Strauss’ reading of Spinoza. Whereas Strauss emphasized the hidden subtext of Spinoza’s arguments, James revives the explicit debates of his time within which Spinoza's Theologico-Political Treatise was situated. But this is not a simple historical reconstruction. James’ close reading of the Treatise offers a radically new perspective on Spinoza’s revolutionary book – a reading that presents startling new perspective on the political, metaphysical and theological implications of the book. Given the importance of Spinoza’s (...)
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  4. Nadler, Steven. A Book Forged in Hell. Spinoza's Scandalous Treatise and the Birth of the Secular Age. [REVIEW]José Luis Cárdenas - 2012 - Ideas Y Valores 61 (150):260-265.
  5. Philosophical Religions From Plato to Spinoza: Reason, Religion, and Autonomy.Carlos Fraenkel - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Many pagan, Jewish, Christian and Muslim philosophers from Antiquity to the Enlightenment made no meaningful distinction between philosophy and religion. Instead they advocated a philosophical religion, arguing that God is Reason and that the historical forms of a religious tradition serve as philosophy's handmaid to promote the life of reason among non-philosophers. Carlos Fraenkel provides the first account of this concept and traces its history back to Plato. He shows how Jews and Christians appropriated it in Antiquity, follows it through (...)
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  6. Review of Susan James, Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion, and Politics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012). [REVIEW]Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2012 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  7. “’Christus Secundum Spiritum’: Spinoza, Jesus, and the Infinite Intellect”.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2012 - In Neta Stahl (ed.), The Jewish Jesus. Routledge.
  8. Spinoza's 'Theological-Political Treatise': A Critical Guide.Yitzhak Y. Melamed & Michael A. Rosenthal (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise was published anonymously in 1670 and immediately provoked huge debate. Its main goal was to claim that the freedom of philosophizing can be allowed in a free republic and that it cannot be abolished without also destroying the peace and piety of that republic. Spinoza criticizes the traditional claims of revelation and offers a social contract theory in which he praises democracy as the most natural form of government. This Critical Guide presents essays by well-known scholars in (...)
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  9. The Miracle of Moses.C. M. Lorkowski - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (2):181-188.
    In this paper, I draw out a tension between miracles, prophecy, and Spinoza’s assertions about Moses in the Theological-Political Treatise (TTP). The three seem to constitute an inconsistent triad. Spinoza’s account of miracles requires a naturalistic interpretation of all events. This categorical claim must therefore apply to prophecy; specifically, Moses’ hearing God’s voice in a manner which does not seem to invoke the imagination or natural phenomena. Thus, Spinoza seemingly cannot maintain both Moses’ exalted status and his account of miracles. (...)
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  10. Philosophy, Theology, and Politics: A Reading of Benedict Spinoza’s Tractatus Theologico-Politicus.Paul J. Bagley - 2008 - Brill.
  11. Sinai Since Spinoza : Reflections on Revelation in Modern Jewish Thought.Paul Franks - 2008 - In George J. Brooke, Hindy Najman & Loren T. Stuckenbruck (eds.), The Significance of Sinai: Traditions About Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity. Brill.
  12. Radical Protestantism in Spinoza’s Thought.Laura Byrne - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (4):868-870.
  13. Radical Protestantism in Spinoza's Thought. [REVIEW]Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):333-334.
    Yitzhak Y. Melamed - Radical Protestantism in Spinoza's Thought - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.2 333-334 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Yitzhak Y. Melamed University of Chicago Graeme Hunter. Radical Protestantism in Spinoza's Thought. Aldershot, UK–Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005. Pp. vii + 196. Cloth, $89.95. If this book's announced and modest aim—"to present the Christian dimension of Spinoza's thought positively and directly" —were all the author meant to achieve, (...)
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  14. Spinoza’s Response to Maimonides: A Practical Strategy for Resolving the Tension Between Reason and Revelation.Steven Frankel - 2005 - International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (3):309-325.
    Spinoza resolves the tension between reason and revelation by granting reason complete authority and autonomy in all philosophical and natural matters, and by denying revelation any claims to knowledge. Despite this dramatic partisanship, he attempts to make this solution attractive to believers by creating a hermeneutic that allows a limited claim to knowledge for revelation. This article attempts to explain how he arrived at this strategy and why he believed it would succeed.
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  15. Spinoza’s Heresy.Shannon Dea - 2004 - Symposium 8 (1):156-158.
  16. Radical Protestantism in Spinoza's Thought.Graeme Hunter - 2004 - Ashgate.
    Context -- A Jew in Amsterdam -- Conflicts and communities -- Christian philosophy? -- A Bible gallery -- Religion and politics in the TTP -- Miracles, meaning, and moderation -- Christian pluralism -- Ethics reconsidered -- Providence, obedience, and love -- Spinoza and Christianity.
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  17. Prophetic Revelation and Miracle in Spinoza's ”Tractatus Theologico-Politicus' - A Philosophical and/or Theological Question?P. Juffermans - 2004 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 66 (3):449-472.
    In Spinoza’s Tractatus Theologico-Politicus two phenomena, which are of crucial importance for revealed religion, namely prophetic revelation and miracle, are investigated in two different ways. The first phenomenon, prophetic revelation, is primarily considered as a theological issue and is mainly discussed on the basis of biblical research. The second phenomenon, miracle, is primarily considered as a philosophical issue and is mainly discussed on the basis of rational principles. The question is raised why Spinoza is using two different methods to discuss (...)
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  18. Whose History? Spinoza’s Critique of Religion As an Other Modernity.Idit Dobbs-Weinstein - 2003 - Idealistic Studies 33 (2/3):219-235.
    This paper discusses Spinoza's critique of religion as a visible moment of a radically occluded materialist Judeo-Arabic Aristotelian philosophical tradition. While the prevailing tradition begins with the familiar gesture to metaphysics as first philosophy, Spinoza's thought takes politics as its point of departure with its concrete emphasis on a critique of dogma. This paper will show-by way of differing readings of Spinoza-how this materialist tradition becomes occluded by the prevailing tradition, even in the work of such careful materialist Spinoza commentators (...)
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  19. Jewish Themes in Spinoza's Philosophy (Review).Yisrael Yehoshua Melamed - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):417-418.
  20. The Piety of a Heretic: Spinoza's Interpretation of Judaism.Steven Frankel - 2002 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 11 (2):117-134.
  21. Spinoza's Dual Teachings of Scripture: His Solution to the Quarrel Between Reason and Revelation.Steven Frankel - 2002 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 84 (3):273-296.
  22. Review of Nadler Steven, Spinoza's Heresy: Immortality and the Jewish Mind[REVIEW]Martin Lin - 2002 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (12).
  23. Spinoza’s Bible: Concerning How It Is That “Scripture, Insofar as It Contains the Word of God, has Come Down to Us Uncorrupted”.Nancy Levene - 2001 - Philosophy and Theology 13 (1):93-142.
    My essay explores the connections between Spinoza’s theory of biblical interpretation and his conception of prophecy, linking the two through what he calls “moral certainty.” The question of what prophecy conveys is connected to the question of how to read Scripture because readers are in a similar position to both the prophets, who attain sure knowledge of some matter revealed by God, and the audience of prophecy, who have access to this knowledge only through faith. Like prophets, readers are interpreters (...)
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  24. Spinoza, Liberalism, and the Question of Jewish Identity.Paul J. Bagley - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 52 (3):730-731.
    In a work that draws on an impressive array of scholarly resources and an extensive study of Spinoza’s teaching, Steven Smith’s recent book examines the status of Spinoza as “the first emancipated Jew” in the broader context of “the Jewish Question”. The author’s interest is to relate Spinoza’s treatment of the theologico-political problem to his advocacy of liberalism and commercial republicanism in the Tractatus theologico-politicus. The authority of the doctrine conveyed in that work is reflected in the championing of religious (...)
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  25. Steven Smith’s, Spinoza, Liberalism, and the Question of Jewish Identity. [REVIEW]Frank Lucash - 1998 - Southwest Philosophy Review 14 (2):179-182.
  26. Faith and Philosophy: Spinoza on Religion.Arthur Clampett Fox - 1990 - University of Western Australia Press.
  27. Baruch or Benedict: On Some Jewish Aspects of Spinoza's Philosophy.Zeev Levy - 1989 - P. Lang.
    This book investigates various aspects of the controversial relations between Spinoza's philosophy and his Jewish background. It examines some important trends of medieval Jewish philosophy on the shaping of Spinoza's thought - particularly the impact of Maimonides. The book elucidates the differences between Spinoza and his predecessors in regard to Bible criticism, and dwells extensively on the concepts of Substance and Pantheism. It also discusses Spinoza's views of Judaism and the Jewish people, the relationship between state and religion, and some (...)
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  28. I. Philosophy and Prophecy: Spinoza's Hermeneutics.Norman O. Brown - 1986 - Political Theory 14 (2):195-213.