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  1. Marjorie Grene and Debra Nails, Eds., Spinoza and the Sciences. [REVIEW]James Morrison - 1987 - Philosophy in Review 7:495-496.
  2. Spinoza on Physical Science.Alison Peterman - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (3):214-223.
    In this paper, I discuss Spinoza on the proper methods and content of physical science. I start by showing how Spinoza's epistemology leads him to a kind of pessimism about the prospects of empirical and mathematical methods in natural philosophy. While they are useful for life, they do not tell us about nature, as Spinoza puts it, “as it is in itself.” At the same time, Spinoza seems to allow that we have some knowledge of physical things and their behavior. (...)
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  3. Marjorie Grene and Debra Nails, Eds., Spinoza and the Sciences Reviewed By.James C. Morrison - 1987 - Philosophy in Review 7 (12):495-496.
  4. Spinoza and Cartesian Mechanics.André Lecrivain - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 15--60.
  5. Spinoza in the Century of Science.Nancy Maull - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 3--13.
  6. Einstein and Spinoza.Michel Paty - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 267--302.
  7. Spinoza and the Rise of Modern Science in the Netherlands.Heine Siebrand - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 61--91.
  8. Parallelism and Complementarity: The Psycho-Physical Problem in Spinoza and in the Succession of Niels Bohr.Hans Jonas - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 237--247.
  9. Annotated Bibliography of Spinoza and the Sciences.Debra Nails - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 305--314.
  10. Spinoza: Scientist and Theorist of Scientific Method.David Savan - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 95--123.
  11. Brenner-Golomb, Nancy:" The Importance of Spinoza for the Modern Philosophy of Science".Pedro Rojas - 2011 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 28:386-388.
    Davidson claims that the basis for all semantic notions is the successful communication. This paper aims at exploring the consequences that this statement has for the notions of both meaning and language. And as a result, it explains why communication is not grounded on conventions or norms.
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  12. Spinoza's Library: The Mathematical and Scientific Works.Henri Krop - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (1):25-43.
  13. Galileo and Spinoza on the Continuity of Matter.Epaminondas Vampoulis - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (1):83-98.
  14. Albert Einstein i jego związki z filozofią Spinozy.S. J. Lisiak - 2012 - Filo-Sofija 12 (17).
    ALBERT EINSTEIN’S CONNECTIONS WITH SPINOZA’S PHILOSOPHY The paper aims to analyze the influence of Baruch Spinoza’s philosophy on Albert Einstein’s work, in particular his physics. Einstein was a man of genius personality of contemporary physics, but we can see him as a prominent philosopher, too. He studied the philosophical works of Kant, Leibniz, Hume and other modern philosophers. But his most preferred thinker was Baruch Spinoza. Einstein knew very well Spinoza’s main book, Ethics. He accepted Spinoza’s concepts of human being (...)
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  15. Nieuwe argumenten tegen de toeschrijving Van het auteurschap Van de „stelkonstige reeckening Van den regenboog” en „reeckening Van kanssen” aan Spinoza.W. N. A. Klever - 1985 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 47 (3):493 - 502.
    An accurate analysis of the text shows that the small treatises have a logical structure and a style which is in all aspects unspinozistic. The main points of difference are : a formalistic interpretation of mathematics‚ the opposition between mathematics and physics‚ slavish cartesianism‚ the presence of numerous pleonasms‚ carelessness of expression‚ parade of learning‚ prolixity‚ attention for irrelevant qualities of authors quoted‚ educational purpose. Together with De Vet’s demonstration that the author of SRR and RK is still alive in (...)
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  16. Galileo and Spinoza.F. Buyse (ed.) - 2013 - Routledge.
  17. Galileo and Spinoza: Introduction.Filip Buyse - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (1):1-3.
  18. Spinoza and Robert Boyle's Definition of Mechanical Philosophy.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2010 - Historia Philosophica 8:73-89.
  19. Spinoza and the Sciences.Ernestine G. E. Van der Wall - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (3):479-480.
  20. "The Order and Connection of Things" - Are They Constructed Mathematically-Deductively According to Spinoza?Amihud Gilead - 1985 - Kant-Studien 76 (1-4):72-78.
  21. Of Children, Fools and Madmen: Spinoza’s Scientific Method and the Constraint of Fact.Debra Nails - 1985 - Southwest Philosophy Review 2:30-42.
    "Of Children, Fools, and Madmen: Spinoza's Scientific Method and the Constraints of Fact" Spinoza has been largely ignored in the history of the scientific method in the seventeenth century. Such neglect is unjustified insofar as Spinoza deliberately circumscribed with scientific method both Biblical hermeneutics (TTP), a field which he deserves credit for founding, and political theory (TP). Although he wrote no discrete discourse on method, he wove his scientific methodological principles into the fabric of his philosophical treatises.
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  22. Spinoza and the Philosophy of Science: Mathematics, Motion, and Being.Eric Schliesser - manuscript
    This chapter argues that the standard conception of Spinoza as a fellow-travelling mechanical philosopher and proto-scientific naturalist is misleading. It argues, first, that Spinoza’s account of the proper method for the study of nature presented in the Theological-Political Treatise (TTP) points away from the one commonly associated with the mechanical philosophy. Moreover, throughout his works Spinoza’s views on the very possibility of knowledge of nature are decidedly sceptical (as specified below). Third, in the seventeenth-century debates over proper methods in the (...)
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  23. Spinoza Contra Curie.Lance Byron Richey - 1993 - Philosophy and Theology 7 (3):323-331.
    I outline Spinoza’s development of the concept of conatus in the Ethics, and attempt to define its role in his metaphysics. In light of this, I critique the theory based on the identification by modern physics of certain radioactive substances, e.g., curium. These substances, I argue, are by definition unstable individuals whose essences include finite durations (half-lives). As such, they are in direct contradiction to Spinoza’s metaphysics. I then advance and critique several defenses Spinoza might make for his theory of (...)
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  24. The Difference Between Science and Philosophy: The Spinoza-Boyle Controversy Revisited.Simon Duffy - 2006 - Paragraph 29 (2):115-138.
    This article examines the seventeenth-century debate between the Dutch philosopher Benedict de Spinoza and the British scientist Robert Boyle, with a view to explicating what the twentieth-century French philosopher Gilles Deleuze considers to be the difference between science and philosophy. The two main themes that are usually drawn from the correspondence of Boyle and Spinoza, and used to polarize the exchange, are the different views on scientific methodology and on the nature of matter that are attributed to each correspondent. Commentators (...)
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  25. Book Review:Spinoza and the Sciences Marjorie Grene, Debra Nails. [REVIEW]Don Garrett - 1988 - Philosophy of Science 55 (3):480-.
  26. Spinoza And The Sciences.Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails - 1986 - Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    The chapters of the book do not situate Spinoza among the natural philosophical giants who opened the way to modern science. Rather they explore Spinoza's relation to the sciences in a variety of ways. Contributors: Joseph Agassi, Thomas Cook, Marjorie Grene, Hans Jonas, André Lecrivain, Genevieve Lloyd, Alexandre Matheron, Nancy Maull, Debra Nails, Michel Paty, Richard H. Popkin, David Savan, Heine Siebrand, and Joe D. Van Zandt.
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  27. Spinoza's Physical Theory.Richard Manning - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  28. Spinoza and the Sciences.Ernestine G. E. der Walvanl - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (3).
Spinoza: Common Notions and Laws of Nature
  1. Spinoza and Christiaan Huygens: The Odd Philosopher and the Odd Sympathy of Pendulum Clocks.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2017 - Society and Politics 11 (2):115-138.
    In 1665, in a response to a question posed by Robert Boyle, Spinoza gave a definition of the coherence between bodies in the universe that seems to be inconsistent both with what he had written in a previous letter to Boyle (1661) and with what he would later write in his main work, the Ethics (1677). Specifically, Spinoza’s 1665 letter to Boyle asserts that bodies can adapt themselves to another body in a non-mechanistic way and absent the agency of an (...)
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  2. A Fresh Look on the Role of the Second Kind of Knowledge in Spinoza’s Ethics.Oliver Istvan Toth - 2017 - Hungarian Philosophical Review (2):37-56.
    In this paper, through a close reading of Spinoza's use of common notions I argue for the role of experiential and experimental knowledge in Spinoza's epistemology.
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  3. „Axioms in Spinoza's Science and Philosophy of Science “.Wim Klever - 1986 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 2:171-195.
  4. Moles in Motu: Principles of Spinoza's Physics.W. N. A. Klever - 1988 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 4:165-194.
  5. The Motion of the Projectile-Elucidation of Spinoza's Physics.Wim Klever - 1993 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 9:335-340.
  6. Zwaarte: Een polemiek in de zeventiende eeuw.W. N. A. Klever - 1990 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 52 (2):280 - 314.
    Gravity was a major theme in the seventeenth century scientific discussion. Trendsetters in the renewal of natural science were Galilei and Descartes. The first required a unified theory of all phenomena of gravity ; the second provided one with his vortex-hypothesis, which explained gravity by the mechanical push of subtile bodies of the vortex. This conception was tested and generally followed by Christiaan Huygens, whereas Newton presented the laws of the so called 'attraction' by which he did not at all (...)
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  7. Spinoza and Galileo Galilei: Adequate Ideas and Intrinsic Qualities of Bodies.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2008 - Historia Philosophica 6:117-127.
  8. Newton and Spinoza: On Motion and Matter (and God, of Course).Eric Schliesser - 2012 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):436-458.
    This study explores several arguments against Spinoza's philosophy that were developed by Henry More, Samuel Clarke, and Colin Maclaurin. In the arguments on which I focus, More, Clarke, and Maclaurin aim to establish the existence of an immaterial and intelligent God precisely by showing that Spinoza does not have the resources to adequately explain the origin of motion. Attending to these criticisms grants us a deeper appreciation for how the authority derived from the empirical success of Newton's enterprise was used (...)
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  9. Spinoza on the Politics of PhilosophicalUnderstanding Susan James and Eric Schliesser Angels and Philosophers: With a New Interpretation of Spinoza's Common Notions.Eric Schliesser - 2011 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (3pt3):497-518.
    In this paper I offer three main challenges to James (2011). All three turn on the nature of philosophy and secure knowledge in Spinoza. First, I criticize James's account of the epistemic role that experience plays in securing adequate ideas for Spinoza. In doing so I criticize her treatment of what is known as the ‘conatus doctrine’ in Spinoza in order to challenge her picture of the relationship between true religion and philosophy. Second, this leads me into a criticism of (...)
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  10. Spinoza and the Concept of a Law of Nature.Jon Miller - 2003 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (3):257 - 276.
    In the early modern period, laws of nature underwent two re markable changes: first, their role in science and philosophy was greatly expanded as they became central to investigation and explanation; and second, ontology (are the laws “real” or not?) and induction emerged as far and away the most important problems of interpretation. The dramatic expansion in the variety of the laws and their range of application, together with the emergence of ontology and induction as (the) paramount problems of interpretation, (...)
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Spinoza: Empirical and Mathematical Science
  1. Spinoza and Christiaan Huygens: The Odd Philosopher and the Odd Sympathy of Pendulum Clocks.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2017 - Society and Politics 11 (2):115-138.
    In 1665, in a response to a question posed by Robert Boyle, Spinoza gave a definition of the coherence between bodies in the universe that seems to be inconsistent both with what he had written in a previous letter to Boyle (1661) and with what he would later write in his main work, the Ethics (1677). Specifically, Spinoza’s 1665 letter to Boyle asserts that bodies can adapt themselves to another body in a non-mechanistic way and absent the agency of an (...)
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  2. A TEORIA ESPINOSANA DE DEFINIÇÃO E A CRÍTICA À CONCEPÇÃO CARTESIANA DE EXTENSÃO.Cristiano Novaes de Rezende - 2011 - Cadernos de História E Filosofia da Ciência 21 (2):353-371.
    In this paper, I comment, in the last letters exchanged between Tschirnhaus and Spinoza, the criticism of the latter to Descartes ́s notion of extension, and the correlation of this criticism with the spinozistic theory of genetic definition. I propose that such a correlation express, in the physical and logical contexts, the spinozistic solution for the classical problem known as “problem of the One and the Many”, in the ontological context.
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  3. Moles in Motu: Principles of Spinoza's Physics.W. N. A. Klever - 1988 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 4:165-194.
  4. The Motion of the Projectile-Elucidation of Spinoza's Physics.Wim Klever - 1993 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 9:335-340.
  5. Zwaarte: Een polemiek in de zeventiende eeuw.W. N. A. Klever - 1990 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 52 (2):280 - 314.
    Gravity was a major theme in the seventeenth century scientific discussion. Trendsetters in the renewal of natural science were Galilei and Descartes. The first required a unified theory of all phenomena of gravity ; the second provided one with his vortex-hypothesis, which explained gravity by the mechanical push of subtile bodies of the vortex. This conception was tested and generally followed by Christiaan Huygens, whereas Newton presented the laws of the so called 'attraction' by which he did not at all (...)
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