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  1. added 2018-10-10
    Nietzsches Wiederholung Spinozas. Ein problemgeschichtlicher Bezug der Konzepte des conatus und des Willens zur Macht.Timon Boehm - 2017 - Nietzsche-Studien 46 (1):28-57.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Nietzsche-Studien Jahrgang: 46 Heft: 1 Seiten: 28-57.
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  2. added 2018-02-27
    Raison, passions et conatus chez Spinoza.Juan-Vicente Cortés-Cuadra - 2017 - Revue des Sciences Philosophiques Et Théologiques 101 (3):405.
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  3. added 2018-02-27
    L’éthique narrative selon Paul Ricoeur : une passerelle entre l’éthique spinoziste et les éthiques du care.Éric Delassus - 2015 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 10 (3):149-167.
    Éric Delassus | : Selon Fabienne Brugère, un point de rencontre existe entre l’éthique spinoziste et les éthiques du care, le care pouvant être envisagé comme une réactualisation du conatus spinoziste. Cet article vise à démontrer que cette convergence peut s’établir à partir d’une éthique narrative inspirée de la pensée de Paul Ricoeur. Cela concerne principalement la perception que l’on peut avoir de soi en tant que corps et esprit, dans la mesure où l’esprit est défini par Baruch Spinoza comme (...)
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  4. added 2017-11-09
    Spinoza on Human Freedom, by Matthew Kisner. [REVIEW]Eugene Marshall - 2012 - Mind 121 (484):1085-1088.
  5. added 2017-11-08
    Spinoza on Conatus, Inertia and the Impossibility of Self-Destruction.F. Buyse - manuscript
    Suicide or self-destruction means in ordinary language “the act of killing oneself deliberately” (intentionally or on purpose). Indeed, that’s what we read in the Oxford dictionary and the Oxford dictionary of philosophy , which seems to be confirmed by the etymology of the term “suicide”, a term introduced around mid-17th century deduced from the modern Latin suicidium, ‘act of suicide’. Traditionally, suicide was regarded as immoral, irreligious and illegal in Western culture. However, during the 17th century this Christian view started (...)
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  6. added 2017-11-08
    Reply to Nadler: Spinoza and the Metaphysics of Suicide.John Grey - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (2):380-388.
    Steven Nadler has argued that Spinoza can, should, and does allow for the possibility of suicide committed as a free and rational action. Given that the conatus is a striving for perfection, Nadler argues, there are cases in which reason guides a person to end her life based on the principle of preferring the lesser evil. If so, Spinoza’s disparaging statements about suicide are intended to apply only to some cases, whereas in others he would grant that suicide is dictated (...)
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  7. added 2017-11-08
    A Spinozistic Model of Moral Education.Johan Dahlbeck - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (5):533-550.
    Spinoza’s claim that self-preservation is the foundation of virtue makes for the point of departure of this philosophical investigation into what a Spinozistic model of moral education might look like. It is argued that Spinoza’s metaphysics places constraints on moral education insofar as an educational account would be affected by Spinoza’s denial of the objectivity of moral knowledge, his denial of the existence of free will, and of moral responsibility. This article discusses these challenges in some detail, seeking to construe (...)
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  8. added 2017-11-08
    Before the Conatus Doctrine: Spinoza’s Correspondence with Willem van Blijenbergh.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2016 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 98 (2):144-168.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie Jahrgang: 98 Heft: 2 Seiten: 144-168.
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  9. added 2017-11-08
    Spinoza on Conatus and Persistence Through Time.Jason Waller - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Research 37:51-72.
    This paper concerns Spinoza’s theory of conatus and an important consequence of this theory concerning how bodies persist through time. I first argue that a conatus is the self-maintaining activity of a mode and not a tendency toward self-preservation or some kind of force. I then argue that it follows from this theory of conatus that bodies persist through time by having temporal parts. I conclude the paper by arguing that attributing a temporal parts metaphysic to Spinoza is not as (...)
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  10. added 2017-11-08
    Spinoza as Educator: From Eudaimonistic Ethics to an Empowering and Liberating Pedagogy.Nimrod Aloni - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (4):531-544.
    Although Spinoza's formative influence on the cultural ideals of the West is widely recognized, especially with reference to liberal democracy, secular humanism, and naturalistic ethics, little has been written about the educational implications of his philosophy. This article explores the pedagogical tenets that are implicit in Spinoza's writings. I argue that Spinoza's ethics is eudaimonistic, aiming at self‐affirmation, full humanity and wellbeing; that the flourishing of individuals depends on their personal resources, namely, their conatus, power, vitality or capacity to act (...)
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  11. added 2017-11-08
    La stratégie du conatus. Affirmation et résistance chez Spinoza.Laurent Bove - 1997 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 59 (4):758-758.
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  12. added 2017-11-08
    The Relation Between Life, Conatus, and Virtue in Spinoza’s Philosophy.Sylvain Zac - 1996 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 19 (1):151-173.
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  13. added 2017-11-08
    Emotion, Appetition, and Conatus in Spinoza.Lee C. Rice - 1977 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 31 (119/120):101.
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  14. added 2017-10-30
    Is Spinoza’s Theory of Finite Mind Coherent? – Death, Affectivity and Epistemology in the Ethics.Oliver Istvan Toth - 2017 - The Concept of Affectivity in Early Modern Philosophy.
    In this paper I examine the question whether Spinoza can account for the necessity of death. I argue that he cannot because within his ethical intellectualist system the subject cannot understand the cause of her death, since by understanding it renders it harmless. Then, I argue that Spinoza could not solve this difficulties because of deeper commitments of his system. At the end I draw a historical parallel to the problem from medieval philosophy.
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  15. added 2017-03-21
    Discussion: Conatus in Spinoza's Ethics.E. M. Brecher - 1933 - Psychological Review 40 (4):388-390.
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  16. added 2016-12-12
    We Do Not Yet Know What the Law Can Do.Alexandre Lefebvre - 2006 - Contemporary Political Theory 5 (1):52-67.
    A recurrent problem in Spinoza's ethical and political philosophy is what beings can do, what their affects are, and how these affects may be diminished or enhanced. This paper focuses on Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise to examine how natural and positive law engages a constitutive relationship with our affective capacity or, in Spinoza's language, our modal power and conatus. This paper begins with a critique of interpretations of Spinoza as a precursor of liberal political and juridical philosophies, and proceeds to argue (...)
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  17. added 2016-12-08
    Spinoza on the Ideality of Time.Geoffrey Gorham - 2013 - Idealistic Studies 43 (1-2):27-40.
    When McTaggart puts Spinoza on his short list of philosophers who considered time unreal, he is falling in line with a reading of Spinoza’s philosophy of time advanced by contemporaneous British Idealists and by Hegel. The idealists understood that there is much at stake concerning the ontological status of Spinozistic time. If time is essential to motion then temporal idealism entails that nearly everything—apart from God conceived sub specie aeternitatis—is imaginary. I argue that although time is indeed ‘imaginary’—in a sense (...)
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  18. added 2016-09-01
    Spinoza and German Idealism.Eckart Förster & Yitzhak Y. Melamed (eds.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    There can be little doubt that without Spinoza, German Idealism would have been just as impossible as it would have been without Kant. Yet the precise nature of Spinoza's influence on the German Idealists has hardly been studied in detail. This volume of essays by leading scholars sheds light on how the appropriation of Spinoza by Fichte, Schelling and Hegel grew out of the reception of his philosophy by, among others, Lessing, Mendelssohn, Jacobi, Herder, Goethe, Schleiermacher, Maimon and, of course, (...)
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  19. added 2016-05-02
    Affect, Desire, and Judgement in Spinoza's Account of Motivation.Justin Steinberg - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (1):67-87.
    Two priority problems frustrate our understanding of Spinoza on desire [cupiditas]. The first problem concerns the relationship between desire and the other two primary affects, joy [laetitia] and sadness [tristitia]. Desire seems to be the oddball of this troika, not only because, contrary to the very definition of an affect, desires do not themselves consist in changes in one's power of acting, but also because desire seems at once more and less basic than joy and sadness. The second problem concerns (...)
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  20. added 2016-05-02
    Fixing Descartes: Ethical Intellectualism in Spinoza's Early Writings.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (3):338-361.
    This paper aims at reconstructing the ethical issues raised by Spinoza's early Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect. Specifically, I argue that Spinoza takes issue with Descartes’ epistemology in order to support a form of “ethical intellectualism” in which knowledge is envisaged as both necessary and sufficient to reach the supreme good. First, I reconstruct how Descartes exploits the distinction between truth and certainty in his Discourse on the Method. On the one hand, this distinction acts as the basis (...)
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  21. added 2016-05-02
    2. Power, Affect, Knowledge: Nietzsche on Spinoza.David Wollenberg - 2015 - In Bartholomew Ryan, Maria Joao Mayer Branco & João Constancio (eds.), Nietzsche and the Problem of Subjectivity. De Gruyter. pp. 65-94.
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  22. added 2016-02-19
    Spinoza's Geometry of Power.Valtteri Viljanen - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    This work examines the unique way in which Benedict de Spinoza combines two significant philosophical principles: that real existence requires causal power and that geometrical objects display exceptionally clearly how things have properties in virtue of their essences. Valtteri Viljanen argues that underlying Spinoza's psychology and ethics is a compelling metaphysical theory according to which each and every genuine thing is an entity of power endowed with an internal structure akin to that of geometrical objects. This allows Spinoza to offer (...)
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  23. added 2015-05-18
    Arturo Andrés Roig, lector de Spinoza.: Arturo Andrés Roig, Spinoza Reader.Gerardo Oviedo - 2010 - Estudios de Filosofía Práctica E Historia de Las Ideas 12 (1):51-65.
    La categoría spinoziana de conatus ocupa un puesto central en la arquitectónica discursiva de la filosofía práctica de Arturo Andrés Roig. Se trata de un fundamento previo del saber práctico-moral que oficia de figura explicativa originaria, pues el conatus concierne a una dimensión primaria de los entes. Su status teórico no se reduce por tanto a reconocer un aspecto antropológico entre otros, sino que adquiere un carácter vertebrador en el conjunto de las estrategias de fundamentación de la idea de "moral (...)
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  24. added 2015-03-23
    Reason, Religion, and Natural Law: From Plato to Spinoza, Edited by Jonathan A. Jacobs.Alex Douglas - 2014 - Mind 123 (491):923-928.
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  25. added 2015-03-09
    From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence. By Michael LeBuffe.Patrick Madigan - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (1):142-143.
  26. added 2015-03-09
    Expressionism in Philosophy: Spinoza.Gilles Deleuze - 1990 - MIT Press.
  27. added 2015-03-06
    Desiring Productivity: Nary a Wasted Moment, Never a Missed Step!Trudy Rudge - 2013 - Nursing Philosophy 14 (3):201-211.
    The purpose of this paper is to explore how nurses are enrolled into and take part in programmes of efficiency and effectiveness. Using the philosophical theorizing about desire as a force or power, I focus specifically on what is understood as relations between desire and productivity in current Westernized health‐care systems. Use is made of the idea from Spinoza that human emotions consist only of pleasure, pain, and desire as these act as a motive force. This is then linked with (...)
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  28. added 2015-03-06
    Two Types of Seventeenth Century Naturalistic Ethics.Michael Leon Lebuffe - 2000 - Dissertation, University of California, San Diego
    Whereas Spinoza's ethics is often thought to be a recasting of Hobbesian ethics, I argue that his theory of motivation is better than Hobbes's, that his theory of value is richer than Hobbes's, and that both are highly distinctive. Edwin Curley and Jonathan Bennett both attribute to Spinoza an ethical theory similar to Hobbes's: all human agents necessarily want to do whatever they think will preserve them, and anything valuable has moral value just because it is a necessary means to (...)
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  29. added 2015-03-06
    Spinoza's Concept of Power.Richard Reilly - 1994 - Dissertation, Rice University
    Power, according to Spinoza, is God's essence. Hence understanding Spinoza's thoughts about power will help us understand Spinoza's God. Since Spinoza's metaphysics is the foundation for his ethics, this understanding will provide insights into the latter as well. ;I begin by examining Spinoza's interpretation of Descartes. This has God outside the universe recreating it each moment; otherwise it would cease to exist. Spinoza concludes that all events exist solely through God's power; neither minds nor bodies have power of their own. (...)
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  30. added 2015-02-26
    Le Désir Et la Réflexion Dans la Philosophie de Spinoza.Robert Misrahi - 1972 - Gordon & Breach.
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  31. added 2015-02-25
    Spinoza's Summum Bonum.Michael Lebuffe - 2005 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (2):243–266.
    : As Spinoza presents it, the knowledge of God is knowledge, primarily, of oneself and, secondarily, of other things. Without this know‐ledge, a mind may not consciously desire to persevere in being. That is why Spinoza claims that the knowledge of God is the most useful thing to the mind at IVP28. He claims that the knowledge of God is the highest good, however, not because it is instrumental to perseverance, but because it is also the best among those goods (...)
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  32. added 2015-02-25
    Spinoza's Theory of Desire.Martin Thomas Lin - 2001 - Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    For Spinoza, human desire manifests the striving for self-preservation exhibited by all natural things. In the dissertation, I argue that Spinoza's theory of desire provides the basis for his theory of human nature, its place in the larger natural order, and its ethical possibilities. Human nature presented a particularly pressing problem for the seventeenth century on account of the ways in which modern science had reconceived the natural world. No longer were appeals to hylomorphism, substance pluralism, on final causes countenanced (...)
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  33. added 2015-02-25
    Self-Preservation and Love in Spinoza's "Ethics".Anneliese Hoos - 2000 - Dissertation, Columbia University
    In my dissertation I explore the relationship between Spinoza's conception of self-preservation and the various forms of love discussed in the Ethics. After considering his early conception of love in the first of four chapters, I show how love, in all its forms, is related to Spinoza's conception of conatus or striving to persist in existence. In contrast to other interpretations of the Ethics, I emphasize the non-teleological component of Spinoza's mature philosophy and argue that love, in particular intellectual love, (...)
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  34. added 2015-02-25
    Ratio Faciens: Method, Act, and Cause in Spinoza's "Ethics".Aaron V. Garrett - 1997 - Dissertation, New School for Social Research
    This dissertation sets out to discuss some features of Spinoza's concepts of conatus and causation, through a discussion of the overall structure of the Ethics. ;The major portion of the dissertation is devoted to Spinoza's method, as employed in the Ethics, the notorious geometric method. I argue against the traditional reading of the method as a simple geometric device, and for a position which emphasizes how the method itself leads the reader to come to the highest kinds of knowledge. This (...)
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  35. added 2015-02-25
    Potenza E Desiderio Nella Filosofia di Spinoza.Silvano Sportelli - 1995
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  36. added 2015-02-25
    A Study of Spinoza's Ethics By Jonathan Bennett. [REVIEW]E. J. Bond - 1986 - Philosophy 61 (235):125-.
  37. added 2015-02-25
    Spinoza's Moral Philosophy.Stephen Anthony Biddle - 1980 - Dissertation, Bryn Mawr College
    Chapter Four uses the concept of an adequate moral theory to evaluate Spinoza's moral philosophy. After isolating four criteria of an adequate moral theory, I attempt to demonstrate that Spinoza's theory can competently meet these standards and that frequently his explanations are superior to the accounts of other moral philosophers. It is this competence in explaining essential elements of our moral experience that warrants a detailed examination of the premises on which Spinoza's moral theory rests. Such an examination must critically (...)
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  38. added 2015-02-02
    Politique de la puissance, politique du capital.Saverio Ansaldi - 2004 - Multitudes 2 (2):199-204.
    The theory of the conatus is a major presupposition of Spinozist philosophy. The principles and concepts involved therein are well known to specialists and interpreters of Spinoza’s philosophy, but unndoubtedly are much less well known or used by economists and sociologists. In his book La politique du capital, Frédéric Lordon, an economist, uses the principles of Spinoza’s theory of the conatus to interpret a financial event and attempt to derive from it the analytic criteria which are necessary to understand it. (...)
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  39. added 2015-01-28
    Feeling Justice: The Reorientation of Possessive Desire in Spinoza.Hasana Sharp - 2005 - International Studies in Philosophy 37 (2):113-130.
    In asserting that the desire to possess what we cannot exclusively and permanently have lies at the root of human misery, Spinoza's Ethics discloses a problem that requires a political response. Although the final part of the Ethics appears to be the least practical of Spinoza's writings, it nonetheless foregrounds the tangible problem of our desire for possession, our desire to have what gives us joy. Moreover, it proposes a remedial practice by means of which this problematic desire might generate (...)
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  40. added 2015-01-06
    Spinoza on Human Freedom: Reason, Autonomy, and the Good Life.Michael LeBuffe - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):195 - 198.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 20, Issue 1, Page 195-198, January 2012.
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  41. added 2015-01-06
    From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence.Steven Nadler - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (5):947-950.
  42. added 2015-01-06
    Change and the Eternal Part of the Mind in Spinoza.Michael Lebuffe - 2010 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):369-384.
    Spinoza insists that we can during the course of our lives increase that part of the mind that is constituted by knowledge, but he also calls that part of the mind its eternal part. How can what is eternal increase? I defend an interpretation on which there is a sense in which the eternal part of the mind can become greater without changing intrinsically at all.
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  43. added 2015-01-06
    Review of Michael LeBuffe, From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence[REVIEW]Eugene Marshall - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (3).
  44. added 2015-01-06
    Spinoza on the Problem of Akrasia.Eugene Marshall - 2010 - European Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):41-59.
    : Two common ways of explaining akrasia will be presented, one which focuses on strength of desire and the other which focuses on action issuing from practical judgment. Though each is intuitive in a certain way, they both fail as explanations of the most interesting cases of akrasia. Spinoza 's own thoughts on bondage and the affects follow, from which a Spinozist explanation of akrasia is constructed. This account is based in Spinoza 's mechanistic psychology of cognitive affects. Because Spinoza (...)
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  45. added 2015-01-06
    From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence.Michael Lebuffe - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Building interconnected readings of Spinoza's accounts of imagination, error, and desire, Michael LeBuffe defends a comprehensive interpretation of Spinoza's ...
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  46. added 2015-01-06
    Spinoza on the Essence of the Human Body and the Part of the Mind That is Eternal.Don Garrett - 2009 - In Olli Koistinen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
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  47. added 2015-01-06
    Spinoza on the Essence of the Human Body.Don Garrett - 2009 - In The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza’s Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 284--302.
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  48. added 2015-01-06
    Spinoza's Psychological Theory.Michael LeBuffe - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  49. added 2015-01-06
    Spinoza's Theory of Motivation.Andrew Youpa - 2007 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 88 (3):375–390.
    On the basis of 3p9s and 3p39s of the Ethics, it might seem that, for Spinoza, a judgment about something's goodness or badness is motivationally inert and, moreover, that value judgments essentially reflect an individual's pre-existing motivational states. However, in this paper I show that Spinoza holds that under certain conditions a motivational state results from a value judgment. Spinoza's theory of motivation consists of two accounts of the psychological order of value judgments and motivational states: an account of their (...)
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  50. added 2015-01-06
    Spinoza's Account of Akrasia.Martin Lin - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):395-414.
    : Perhaps the central problem which preoccupies Spinoza as a moral philosopher is the conflict between reason and passion. He belongs to a long tradition that sees the key to happiness and virtue as mastery and control by reason over the passions. This mastery, however, is hard won, as the passions often overwhelm its power and subvert its rule. When reason succumbs to passion, we act against our better judgment. Such action is often termed 'akratic'. Many commentators have complained that (...)
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