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  1. Spinoza as Educator: From Eudaimonistic Ethics to an Empowering and Liberating Pedagogy.Aloni Nimrod - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (4):531-544.
    Although Spinoza's formative influence on the cultural ideals of the West is widely recognized, especially with reference to liberal democracy, secular humanism, and naturalistic ethics, little has been written about the educational implications of his philosophy. This article explores the pedagogical tenets that are implicit in Spinoza's writings. I argue that Spinoza's ethics is eudaimonistic, aiming at self‐affirmation, full humanity and wellbeing; that the flourishing of individuals depends on their personal resources, namely, their conatus, power, vitality or capacity to act (...)
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  2. Politique de la puissance, politique du capital.Saverio Ansaldi - 2004 - Multitudes 2 (2):199-204.
    The theory of the conatus is a major presupposition of Spinozist philosophy. The principles and concepts involved therein are well known to specialists and interpreters of Spinoza’s philosophy, but unndoubtedly are much less well known or used by economists and sociologists. In his book La politique du capital, Frédéric Lordon, an economist, uses the principles of Spinoza’s theory of the conatus to interpret a financial event and attempt to derive from it the analytic criteria which are necessary to understand it. (...)
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  3. Deseo, voluntad y dolor en Spinoza, Schopenhauer y Nietzsche.Ruperto Arrocha González - 2011 - Apuntes Filosóficos 20 (39).
    Al intentar clarificar lo que Spinoza, Schopenhauer y Nietzsche entienden por deseo encontramos que este concepto está asociado en ellos a una particular acepción de la idea de voluntad. En Spinoza y en Schopenhauer se encuentra presente esta identificación. En Nietzsche el deseo se encuentra oculto, disimulado y encerrado en las figuras metafóricas de lo dionisíaco y lo melódico. Desire, Will and Pain in Spinoza, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche In attempting to clarify what Spinoza, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche understand by desire, we (...)
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  4. Spinoza and Teleology: A Reply to Curley.Jonathan Bennett - 1990 - In E. M. Curley & Pierre-François Moreau (eds.). Brill. pp. 53-7.
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  5. Teleology and Spinoza's Conatus.Jonathan Bennett - 1983 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 8 (1):143-160.
  6. Spinoza's Moral Philosophy.Stephen Anthony Biddle - 1980 - Dissertation, Bryn Mawr College
    Chapter Four uses the concept of an adequate moral theory to evaluate Spinoza's moral philosophy. After isolating four criteria of an adequate moral theory, I attempt to demonstrate that Spinoza's theory can competently meet these standards and that frequently his explanations are superior to the accounts of other moral philosophers. It is this competence in explaining essential elements of our moral experience that warrants a detailed examination of the premises on which Spinoza's moral theory rests. Such an examination must critically (...)
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  7. The Psychology and Ethics of Spinoza.David Bidney - 1962 - New York: Russell & Russell.
  8. The Psychology and Ethics of Spinoza; a Study in the History and Logic of Ideas.David Bidney (ed.) - 1940 - Yale University Press.
  9. A Study of Spinoza's Ethics By Jonathan Bennett. [REVIEW]E. J. Bond - 1986 - Philosophy 61 (235):125-.
  10. La stratégie du conatus. Affirmation et résistance chez Spinoza.Laurent Bove - 1997 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 59 (4):758-758.
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  11. La Stratégie du Conatus: Affirmation Et Résistance Chez Spinoza.Laurent Bove - 1996 - Vrin.
    C'est tout d'abord du point de vue de cette dynamique de la résistance-active du conatus à un écrasement total par des forces extérieures plus puissantes, que l' affirmation de l'existence se dit stratégie. A la racine de toute existence il y a la ...
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  12. Discussion: Conatus in Spinoza's Ethics.E. M. Brecher - 1933 - Psychological Review 40 (4):388-390.
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  13. Spinoza on Conatus, Inertia and the Impossibility of Self-Destruction.F. Buyse - manuscript
    Suicide or self-destruction means in ordinary language “the act of killing oneself deliberately” (intentionally or on purpose). Indeed, that’s what we read in the Oxford dictionary and the Oxford dictionary of philosophy , which seems to be confirmed by the etymology of the term “suicide”, a term introduced around mid-17th century deduced from the modern Latin suicidium, ‘act of suicide’. Traditionally, suicide was regarded as immoral, irreligious and illegal in Western culture. However, during the 17th century this Christian view started (...)
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  14. Conatus and Perfection in Spinoza.John Carriero - 2011 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 35 (1):69-92.
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  15. Spinoza on Final Causality.John Carriero - 2005 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 2:105-47.
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  16. Self-Knowledge as Self-Preservation?J. Thomas Cook - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 191--210.
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  17. A Spinozistic Model of Moral Education.Johan Dahlbeck - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (5):533-550.
    Spinoza’s claim that self-preservation is the foundation of virtue makes for the point of departure of this philosophical investigation into what a Spinozistic model of moral education might look like. It is argued that Spinoza’s metaphysics places constraints on moral education insofar as an educational account would be affected by Spinoza’s denial of the objectivity of moral knowledge, his denial of the existence of free will, and of moral responsibility. This article discusses these challenges in some detail, seeking to construe (...)
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  18. Expressionism in Philosophy: Spinoza.Gilles Deleuze - 1990 - MIT Press.
  19. Spinoza's Metaphysical Psychology.Michael Della Rocca - 1996 - In Don Garrett (ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 192--266.
    This paper analyzes and evaluates Spinoza way of carrying out his naturalistic program in psychology. I begin by examining Spinoza’s general metaphysical doctrine according to which each thing strives to preserve itself. While this doctrine cannot be true in its unqualified form, it does receive some support from Spinoza’s views on the nature of complex individuals. I then explore the problematic way in which Spinoza applies the doctrine of self -preservation to human psychology. The paper goes on the investigate the (...)
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  20. Reason, Religion, and Natural Law: From Plato to Spinoza, Edited by Jonathan A. Jacobs.Alex Douglas - 2014 - Mind 123 (491):923-928.
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  21. Spinoza and German Idealism.Eckart Förster & Yitzhak Y. Melamed (eds.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    There can be little doubt that without Spinoza, German Idealism would have been just as impossible as it would have been without Kant. Yet the precise nature of Spinoza's influence on the German Idealists has hardly been studied in detail. This volume of essays by leading scholars sheds light on how the appropriation of Spinoza by Fichte, Schelling and Hegel grew out of the reception of his philosophy by, among others, Lessing, Mendelssohn, Jacobi, Herder, Goethe, Schleiermacher, Maimon and, of course, (...)
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  22. Spinoza on Self-Preservation and Self-Destruction.Mitchell Gabhart - 1999 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (4):613-628.
  23. Late-Scholastic and Cartesian Conatus.Rodolfo Garau - 2014 - Intellectual History Review 24 (4):479-494.
    Introduction Conatus is a specific concept within Descartes’s physics. In particular, it assumes a crucial importance in the purely mechanistic description of the nature of light – an issue that Des- cartes considered one of the most crucial challenges, and major achievements, of his natural phil- osophy. According to Descartes’s cosmology, the universe – understood as a material continuum in which there is no vacuum – is composed of a number of separate yet interconnected vortices. Each of these vortices consists (...)
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  24. Descartes and Spinoza on Persistance and Conatus.Daniel Garber - 1994 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 10:43-68.
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  25. Ratio Faciens: Method, Act, and Cause in Spinoza's "Ethics".Aaron V. Garrett - 1997 - Dissertation, New School for Social Research
    This dissertation sets out to discuss some features of Spinoza's concepts of conatus and causation, through a discussion of the overall structure of the Ethics. ;The major portion of the dissertation is devoted to Spinoza's method, as employed in the Ethics, the notorious geometric method. I argue against the traditional reading of the method as a simple geometric device, and for a position which emphasizes how the method itself leads the reader to come to the highest kinds of knowledge. This (...)
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  26. Spinoza on the Essence of the Human Body and the Part of the Mind That is Eternal.Don Garrett - 2009 - In Olli Koistinen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
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  27. Spinoza on the Essence of the Human Body.Don Garrett - 2009 - In The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza’s Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 284--302.
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  28. Spinoza's Conatus Argument.Don Garrett - 2002 - In Olli Koistinen & J. I. Biro (eds.), Spinoza: Metaphysical Themes. Oxford University Press. pp. 127--58.
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  29. Teleology in Spinoza and Early Modern Rationalism.Don Garrett - 1999 - In Gennaro Rocco & Huenemann Charles (eds.), New Essays on the Rationalists. Oxford University Press. pp. 310--36.
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  30. Spinoza on the Ideality of Time.Geoffrey Gorham - 2013 - Idealistic Studies 43 (1-2):27-40.
    When McTaggart puts Spinoza on his short list of philosophers who considered time unreal, he is falling in line with a reading of Spinoza’s philosophy of time advanced by contemporaneous British Idealists and by Hegel. The idealists understood that there is much at stake concerning the ontological status of Spinozistic time. If time is essential to motion then temporal idealism entails that nearly everything—apart from God conceived sub specie aeternitatis—is imaginary. I argue that although time is indeed ‘imaginary’—in a sense (...)
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  31. Reply to Nadler: Spinoza and the Metaphysics of Suicide.John Grey - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (2):380-388.
    Steven Nadler has argued that Spinoza can, should, and does allow for the possibility of suicide committed as a free and rational action. Given that the conatus is a striving for perfection, Nadler argues, there are cases in which reason guides a person to end her life based on the principle of preferring the lesser evil. If so, Spinoza’s disparaging statements about suicide are intended to apply only to some cases, whereas in others he would grant that suicide is dictated (...)
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  32. On Bayle’s Interpretation of Spinoza’s Substance and Modes.A. Guilherme - 2009 - Conatus 3 (6):11-16.
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  33. Spinoza's Theory of Human Freedom.Stuart Hampshire - 1971 - The Monist 55 (4):554-566.
  34. Self-Preservation and Love in Spinoza's "Ethics".Anneliese Hoos - 2000 - Dissertation, Columbia University
    In my dissertation I explore the relationship between Spinoza's conception of self-preservation and the various forms of love discussed in the Ethics. After considering his early conception of love in the first of four chapters, I show how love, in all its forms, is related to Spinoza's conception of conatus or striving to persist in existence. In contrast to other interpretations of the Ethics, I emphasize the non-teleological component of Spinoza's mature philosophy and argue that love, in particular intellectual love, (...)
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  35. Spinoza's Unorthodox Metaphysics of the Will.Karolina Hübner - 2013 - In Michael Della Rocca (ed.), The Oxford Handbook to Spinoza.
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  36. Perfection and Desire: Spinoza on the Good.Matthew J. Kisner - 2010 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):97-117.
    While Spinoza claims that our good is both what increases our essential power and what helps us to satisfy our desires, he admits that people desire things that do not increase their power. This paper addresses this problem by arguing that Spinoza conceives of desires as expressions of our conatus , so that satisfying our desires necessarily increases our power and vice versa. This reading holds, in opposition to recent work, that Spinoza upholds a desire-satisfaction theory of the good, though (...)
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  37. Emotion, Appetition, and Conatus in Spinoza.Rice Lc - 1977 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 31 (119-120):101-116.
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  38. Spinoza on Human Freedom: Reason, Autonomy, and the Good Life.Michael LeBuffe - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):195 - 198.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 20, Issue 1, Page 195-198, January 2012.
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  39. Change and the Eternal Part of the Mind in Spinoza.Michael Lebuffe - 2010 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):369-384.
    Spinoza insists that we can during the course of our lives increase that part of the mind that is constituted by knowledge, but he also calls that part of the mind its eternal part. How can what is eternal increase? I defend an interpretation on which there is a sense in which the eternal part of the mind can become greater without changing intrinsically at all.
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  40. From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence.Michael LeBuffe - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Building interconnected readings of Spinoza's accounts of imagination, error, and desire, Michael LeBuffe defends a comprehensive interpretation of Spinoza's ...
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  41. Spinoza's Psychological Theory.Michael LeBuffe - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  42. Spinoza's Summum Bonum.Michael Lebuffe - 2005 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (2):243–266.
    : As Spinoza presents it, the knowledge of God is knowledge, primarily, of oneself and, secondarily, of other things. Without this know‐ledge, a mind may not consciously desire to persevere in being. That is why Spinoza claims that the knowledge of God is the most useful thing to the mind at IVP28. He claims that the knowledge of God is the highest good, however, not because it is instrumental to perseverance, but because it is also the best among those goods (...)
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  43. Why Spinoza Tells People to Try to Preserve Their Being.Michael Lebuffe - 2004 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 86 (2):119-145.
    It is puzzling that Spinoza both urges people to seek to preserve themselves and also holds that, as a matter of fact, people do strive to preserve themselves. I argue that the striving for self-preservation that characterizes all individuals grounds, for Spinoza, the claim that human beings seek only whatever they anticipate will lead to pleasure (laetitia). People desire ends other than self-preservation because they anticipate pleasure in those ends, and Spinoza urges people to seek to preserve themselves because he (...)
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  44. Two Types of Seventeenth Century Naturalistic Ethics.Michael Leon Lebuffe - 2000 - Dissertation, University of California, San Diego
    Whereas Spinoza's ethics is often thought to be a recasting of Hobbesian ethics, I argue that his theory of motivation is better than Hobbes's, that his theory of value is richer than Hobbes's, and that both are highly distinctive. Edwin Curley and Jonathan Bennett both attribute to Spinoza an ethical theory similar to Hobbes's: all human agents necessarily want to do whatever they think will preserve them, and anything valuable has moral value just because it is a necessary means to (...)
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  45. We Do Not Yet Know What the Law Can Do.Alexandre Lefebvre - 2006 - Contemporary Political Theory 5 (1):52-67.
    A recurrent problem in Spinoza's ethical and political philosophy is what beings can do, what their affects are, and how these affects may be diminished or enhanced. This paper focuses on Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise to examine how natural and positive law engages a constitutive relationship with our affective capacity or, in Spinoza's language, our modal power and conatus. This paper begins with a critique of interpretations of Spinoza as a precursor of liberal political and juridical philosophies, and proceeds to argue (...)
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  46. The Causality of Finite Modes in Spinoza's "Ethics".James G. Lennox - 1976 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 6 (3):479 - 500.
  47. L'Automate spirituel. La subjectivé moderne d'après l'Ethique de Spinoza.Lia Levy - 2000 - Van Gorcum.
    According to the majority of interpreters of Spinozist philosophy, his doctrine is independent of the modern notion of subjectivity. This study, however, shows that the theory of human knowledge presented in the Ethics can not be rightly understood without adding a certain concept of self-consciousness, and so must contain a theory of subjectivity. Moreover, this theory is reconstructed from Spinozist concepts: self-awareness is, for man, the manifestation of his conatus as a finite thinking unity existing in duration . This reconstruction (...)
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  48. Spinoza's Account of Akrasia.Martin Lin - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):395-414.
    : Perhaps the central problem which preoccupies Spinoza as a moral philosopher is the conflict between reason and passion. He belongs to a long tradition that sees the key to happiness and virtue as mastery and control by reason over the passions. This mastery, however, is hard won, as the passions often overwhelm its power and subvert its rule. When reason succumbs to passion, we act against our better judgment. Such action is often termed 'akratic'. Many commentators have complained that (...)
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  49. Spinozas Metaphysics of Desire.Martin Lin - 2004 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 86 (1):21-55.
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  50. Spinoza's Theory of Desire.Martin Thomas Lin - 2001 - Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    For Spinoza, human desire manifests the striving for self-preservation exhibited by all natural things. In the dissertation, I argue that Spinoza's theory of desire provides the basis for his theory of human nature, its place in the larger natural order, and its ethical possibilities. Human nature presented a particularly pressing problem for the seventeenth century on account of the ways in which modern science had reconceived the natural world. No longer were appeals to hylomorphism, substance pluralism, on final causes countenanced (...)
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